More

Jon Stewart urges action from Congress in his return to 'The Daily Show.'

They say, "Never forget," but their actions tell a very different story.

Jon Stewart's been busy since he ended his more than 16-year run as host of "The Daily Show."

And while he may not have been popping up on your TV to give his take on the day's news, he hasn't exactly been kicking back and relaxing in his retirement.

He's been helping turn his 12-acre farm outside New York City into an animal sanctuary, and he's continued his work trying to help 9/11 first responders get the health care they need and deserve. It's the latter cause that's got him back in the news.


Jon Stewart holds a news conference in September 2015, urging Congress to extend the Zadroga 9/11 health bill. Photo by Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images.

On Monday, Dec. 7, Stewart returned to "The Daily Show" to use the show's platform to push for change once again.

In late 2009, Stewart helped draw attention to the James Zadroga 9/11 Health and Compensation Act. The bill was designed to help cover the health care costs of the nearly 50,000 first responders in the 9/11 attacks.

With plenty of data showing the long-term physical and mental health struggles faced by 9/11 first responders, it seemed like our duty as a country to take care of them. And while the bill passed, it only received five years of funding.

Stewart's goal? To push Congress to make that funding permanent.

Stewart accuses Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell of refusing to move the Zadroga renewal bill forward for "purely political reasons." Image via "The Daily Show"/Comedy Central.

Both Democrats and Republicans support the bill, so what's holding it up? Well...

"It seems like a no-brainer," says host Trevor Noah, about making the Zadroga bill's funding permanent. "So, Jon, what's holding it up now?"

"No brains," Stewart deadpans.

There are 67 Senators and 260 members of the House of Representatives in support of this bill. If Congress were to vote on it, the bill would easily pass. The problem lies with Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-KY) and Speaker of the House Paul Ryan (R-WI).

Stewart says he has hopes that Speaker Ryan will bring the bill to a vote in the House, but Senator McConnell is a different story.

Ryan and McConnell are seen here walking the halls of Congress. Photo by Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images.

There are very real, tragic consequences of inaction. Luckily, they can be avoided if Congress acts.

Perhaps the most powerful moment of Stewart's return to "The Daily Show" was when he recreated the panel discussion he had during that first push to get the Zadroga Act passed. The original panel featured four 9/11 first responders making the case for why members of Congress — who so frequently call these responders heroes and say things like "never forget" — should fund their health care for illness related to that day.

Now? There's just one left. Two of the others were too sick to appear on the show, and the fourth died.

Stewart sits with the lone remaining panelist from his show five years ago. Screenshot via "The Daily Show"/Comedy Central.

But we can help by using social media to urging Congressional leaders to give the extension bill a vote.

Using the hashtag #WorstResponders, The Daily Show viewers have already begun pleading with Senator McConnell to stop blocking the bill and to make permanent the health benefits the brave individuals who ran toward danger on 9/11 so desperately need.


You can watch the video of Jon Stewart's return to "The Daily Show" below.

Get More: Comedy Central,Funny Videos,Funny TV Shows

via Jody Danielle Fisher / Facebook

Breast milk is an incredibly magical food. The wonderful thing is that it's produced by a collaboration between mother and baby.

British mother Jody Danielle Fisher shared the miracle of this collaboration on Facebook recently after having her 13-month-old child vaccinated.

In the post, she compared the color of her breast milk before and after the vaccination, to show how a baby's reaction to the vaccine has a direct effect on her mother's milk production.

Keep Reading Show less
Photo by Picsea on Unsplash
True

It is said that once you've seen something, you can't unsee it. This is exactly what is happening in America right now. We have collectively watched the pot of racial tension boil over after years of looking the other way, insisting that hot water doesn't exist, pretending not to notice the smoke billowing out from every direction.

Ignoring a problem doesn't make it go away—it prolongs resolution. There's a whole lot of harm to be remedied and damage to be repaired as a result of racial injustice, and it's up to all of us to figure out how to do that. Parents, in particular, are recognizing the importance of raising anti-racist children; if we are unable to completely eradicate racism, maybe the next generation will.

How can parents ensure that the next generation will actively refuse to perpetuate systems and behaviors embedded in racism? The most obvious answer is to model it. Take for example, professional tennis player Serena Williams and her husband, Reddit co-founder Alexis Ohanian.

Keep Reading Show less
Photo by Mahir Uysal on Unsplash

Two years ago, I got off the phone after an interview and cried my eyes out. I'd just spent an hour talking to Tim Ballard, the founder of Operation Underground Railroad, an organization that helps fight child sex trafficking, and I just couldn't take it.

Ballard told me about how the training to go undercover as a child predator nearly broke him. He told me an eerie story of a trafficker who could totally compartmentalize, showing Ballard photos of kids he had for sale, then switching gears to proudly show him a photo of his own daughter on her bicycle, just as any parent would. He told me about how lucrative child trafficking is—how a child can bring in three or four times as much as a female prostitute—and how Americans are the industry's biggest consumers.

Keep Reading Show less

Believe it or not, there has been a lot of controversy lately about how people cook rice. According to CNN, the "outrage" was a reaction to a clip Malaysian comedian Nigel Ng posted as one of his personas known as Uncle Roger.

It was a hilarious (and harmless) satire about the method chef Hersha Patel used to cook rice on the show BBC Food.


Keep Reading Show less