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How would you feel if someone shortchanged your daughter's lemonade stand? Probably not so good.

Maybe you'd first wonder, "What kind of schmuck cheats a little kid?"


All images via Make It Work/YouTube.

But then you'd probably want justice. And if you couldn't give it to them in that moment they're doubting humanity, maybe you'd turn it into a teachable moment.

That's exactly the idea with a video for Make It Work, a campaign focused on policies that can help working families. The two-minute film was directed by Issa Rae, who's best known for her YouTube comedy series "Awkward Black Girl."

In an interview with Essence, Rae explained why she decided to get involved:

“I was one of many Americans who just didn't know men and women weren't being paid the same. ... So I figured if I didn't know, lots of other people didn't know."

What she produced is a kid-friendly take on a problem affecting millions of women.

Daughters, sisters, moms, aunts, and grandmas are shortchanged every day by the gender pay gap.

For every dollar men earn...

...women earn less than 80 cents.

Today, women earn on average about $11,000 less per year than men for the exact same jobs.

The Institute for Women's Policy Research says if wage growth for women continues at its current pace, it'll be the year 2059 by the time we see equal pay for men and women. "We're slated to have flying cars and humans on Mars first," wrote Rae. "I wish I were joking."

But pay equality could take longer for women of color. For example, black women earn only 63 cents for every dollar earned by men...

...and Latina women earn little more than half of what men make.

The gender pay gap is leaving black and Latina women roughly $22,000 and $25,000 short, respectively, every year. Again, for the exact same work.

Sometimes, convincing our bosses and officials that the gender pay gap is wrong feels like pulling teeth.

When the perpetrators of pay inequality in the video are challenged, they respond with excuses...

...avoidance...

...victim-blaming...

...and logic even they can't defend.

Just as you wouldn't stand for someone cheating your kid at a lemonade stand, so should we be about the pay gap.

Why? Because "gone are the days of men bringing home the bacon while women fry it up in the pan," say the advocates at Make It Work. "The world has changed, and our rules need to sprint to catch up."

Watch Issa Rae's video for Make It Work, and if you learn something new, do working women and their families a solid by passing on this story.

10/10. The Mayyas dance.

We can almost always expect to see amazing acts and rare skills on “America’s Got Talent.” But sometimes, we get even more than that.

The Mayyas, a Lebanese women’s dance troupe whose name means “proud walk of a lioness,” delivered a performance so mesmerizing that judge Simon Cowell called it the “best dance act” the show has ever seen, winning them an almost instant golden buzzer.

Perhaps this victory comes as no surprise, considering that the Mayyas had previously won “Arab’s Got Talent” in 2019 and competed on “Britain’s Got Talent: The Champions.” But truly, it’s what motivates them to take to the stage that’s remarkable.

“Lebanon is a very beautiful country, but we live a daily struggle," one of the dancers said to the judges just moments before their audition. Another explained, “being a dancer as a female Arab is not fully supported yet.”

Nadim Cherfan, the team’s choreographer, added that “Lebanon is not considered a place where you can build a career out of dancing, so it’s really hard, and harder for women.”

Still, Cherfan shared that it was a previous “AGT” star who inspired the Mayyas to defy the odds and audition anyway. Nightbirde, a breakout singer who also earned a golden buzzer before tragically passing away in February 2021 due to cancer, had told the audience, “You can't wait until life isn't hard anymore before you decide to be happy.” The dance team took the advice to heart.

For the Mayyas, coming onto the “AGT” stage became more than an audition opportunity. Getting emotional, one of the dancers declared that it was “our only chance to prove to the world what Arab women can do, the art we can create, the fights we fight.”

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Goodbye. Maureen. Your "favorite child" will miss you.

What makes a good obituary? First, it should probably reflect the essence of the recently deceased person in an authentic, honest light. Second, it should feel personal, showing how that person’s life affected the lives of others. Then, of course, the right dash of humor can certainly help spark joy in an otherwise solemn moment.

New York Times journalist Caity Weaver achieved all those things masterfully in a eulogy written for her mother—the coupon-clipping, chronically late, green-thumbed Dr. Maureen Brennan-Weaver.

Caity clearly put her knack with words to good use, because her hilarious tribute quickly went viral on Twitter, leaving people not only with a good giggle, but a very precise picture of her mom.
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Hold on, Frankie! Mama's coming!

How do you explain motherhood in a nutshell? Thanks to Cait Oakley, who stopped a preying bald eagle from capturing her pet goose as she breastfed her daughter, we have it summed up in one gloriously hilarious TikTok.

The now viral video shows the family’s pet goose, Frankie, frantically squawking as it gets dragged off the porch by a bald eagle—likely another mom taking care of her own kiddos.

Wearing nothing but her husband’s boxers while holding on to her newborn, Willow, Oakley dashes out of the house and successfully comes to Frankie's rescue while yelling “hey, hey hey!”

The video’s caption revealed that the Oakleys had already lost three chickens due to hungry birds of prey, so nothing was going to stop “Mama bear” from protecting “sweet Frankie.” Not even a breastfeeding session.

Oakley told TODAY Parents, “It was just a split second reaction ...There was nowhere to put Willow down at that point.” Sometimes being a mom means feeding your child and saving your pet all at the same time.

As for how she feels about running around topless in her underwear on camera, Oakley declared, “I could have been naked and I’m like, ‘whatever, I’m feeding my baby.’”

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