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Honey on tap seemed like a good idea, but it could be flawed. Here's why.

Bees (and WE) have a problem. But is Flow Hive really the way to help?

Honey on tap seemed like a good idea, but it could be flawed. Here's why.

There's a bee problem.

And that's a problem because we humans heavily rely on bees for the food we eat.


Many people have good intentions to help — including the inventors of the Flow Hive, who raised over $10 million on Indiegogo to bring the invention into reality.

Their premise is that making beekeeping easier for average consumers will attract more people to the hobby, thereby increasing bee populations and getting more people up to speed on why bees are important.

But some bee experts argue that it's the wrong kind of help and could do more harm than good.

Maryam Henein, the filmmaker and advocate behind "Vanishing of the Bees," lays out three big problems she sees with the Flow Hive.

by Maryam Henein

1. Plastic Honeycombs: Bees create wax from their own abdomens. They have no use for the plastic.

"But instead of working with the wax comb they've created, the Flow Hive forces bees to deal with hormone-disrupting plastics that off-gas.

“Honey bees are able to recognize the smallest differences in wax composition but not polypropylene," adds Jonathan Powell, of The Natural Beekeeping Trust.

2. Nonexistent communion between bees and beings:

"If you just want honey, make friends with a beekeeper."

The Flow Hive is touted as a "beekeeper's dream." But in my opinion, it's a wannabe's fantasy. The point of beekeeping is to commune with the bees, not to further remove oneself from them. There's nothing like slowing down, with reverence and care, to peek into a hive and observe the virgin sisters of toil. Bees work themselves to death, so why should we have such easy access to their food?

"I always tell beginners in my workshops, there is only one real reason to keep bees, and that is because they are fascinating. If you just want honey, make friends with a beekeeper," says a beekeeper in Australia who goes by Adrian the Bee Man.

3. "Expensive gimmick":

For $600, you get a full automatic bee farm. But many beekeepers I've spoken to believe that it's overpriced and unsustainable. Flow Hive actually costs more than a standard Langstroth hive.

Flow Hive has been described as a possible "key in keeping the world's bee population from further decline." Really? How so? This just makes honey collection simpler and easier. How does it help bees survive the issues they are currently grappling with? Like systemic pesticides and loss of habitat?

To quote Ricciardi once more, Flow Hive invites "lazy, hungry honey-eaters who are also terrified of being stung. It will create a generation of oblivious people who don't know the delicate mechanics of the beautiful hive."

Please note that no one is saying that these people are bad. But as they say, the road to hell was paved with good intentions, and "good inventions" too.

A big thanks to Maryam Henein, both for the above insight and for her permission to share it.

What is a true bee lover and helper to do?

Why not spend a day in a workshop at your local beekeeping co-op? They are all over and a quick Google search can help find your nearest hives. You could take your kids, go on an unforgettable date, or just entertain some friends.

Support local bee lovers by purchasing local honey for yourself and for gift-giving.

And commit to learning about the reasons why our honeybee population is so threatened right now.

It's not too late to start caring about our bees!

Courtesy of Verizon
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If someone were to say "video games" to you, what are the first words that come to mind? Whatever words you thought of (fun, exciting, etc.), we're willing to guess "healthy" or "mental health tool" didn't pop into your mind.

And yet… it turns out they are. Especially for Veterans.

How? Well, for one thing, video games — and virtual reality more generally — are also more accessible and less stigmatized to veterans than mental health treatment. In fact, some psychiatrists are using virtual reality systems for this reason to treat PTSD.

Secondly, video games allow people to socialize in new ways with people who share common interests and goals. And for Veterans, many of whom leave the military feeling isolated or lonely after they lose the daily camaraderie of their regiment, that socialization is critical to their mental health. It gives them a virtual group of friends to talk with, connect to, and relate to through shared goals and interests.

In addition, according to a 2018 study, since many video games simulate real-life situations they encountered during their service, it makes socialization easier since they can relate to and find common ground with other gamers while playing.

This can help ease symptoms of depression, anxiety, and even PTSD in Veterans, which affects 20% of the Veterans who have served since 9/11.

Watch here as Verizon dives into the stories of three Veteran gamers to learn how video games helped them build community, deal with trauma and have some fun.

Band of Gamers www.youtube.com

Video games have been especially beneficial to Veterans since the beginning of the pandemic when all of us — Veterans included — have been even more isolated than ever before.

And that's why Verizon launched a challenge last year, which saw $30,000 donated to four military charities.

And this year, they're going even bigger by launching a new World of Warships charity tournament in partnership with Wargaming and Wounded Warrior Project called "Verizon Warrior Series." During the tournament, gamers will be able to interact with the game's iconic ships in new and exciting ways, all while giving back.

Together with these nonprofits, the tournament will welcome teams all across the nation in order to raise money for military charities helping Veterans in need. There will be a $100,000 prize pool donated to these charities, as well as donation drives for injured Veterans at every match during the tournament to raise extra funds.

Verizon is also providing special discounts to Those Who Serve communities, including military and first responders, and they're offering a $75 in-game content military promo for World of Warships.

Tournament finals are scheduled for August 8, so be sure to tune in to the tournament and donate if you can in order to give back to Veterans in need.

Courtesy of Verizon

When the COVID-19 pandemic socially distanced the world and pushed off the 2020 Olympics, we knew the games weren't going to be the same. The fact that they're even happening this year is a miracle, but without spectators and the usual hustle and bustle surrounding the events, it definitely feels different.

But it's not just the games themselves that have changed. The coverage of the Olympics has changed as well, including the unexpected addition of un-expert, uncensored commentary from comedian Kevin Hart and rapper Snoop Dogg on NBC's Peacock.

In the topsy-turvy world we're currently living in, it's both a refreshing and hilarious addition to the Olympic lineup.

Just watch this clip of them narrating an equestrian event. (Language warning if you've got kiddos nearby. The first video is bleeped, but the others aren't.)

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