Here are 3 of the newest TV shows to add more diversity to American entertainment.

Must-see TV.

Last season's "Empire," "Sleepy Hollow," and "How to Get Away With Murder" showed television executives that people of color not only can lead interesting programming, but they can lead programming that interests white people as well.

Now, there is a new crop of minority-led programming that will greet us this fall. Here are some of the most promising offerings.


"Quantico"

Plot summary: A diverse group of recruits has arrived at the FBI Quantico Base for training. They are the best, the brightest, and the most vetted, so it seems impossible that one of them is suspected of masterminding the biggest attack on New York City since 9/11.

The great thing about this show is that it's led by an entertainment veteran (and if you watch Bollywood movies, you know who she is). Actress and former Miss World India Priyanka Chopra is so famous internationally that her nearly 10 million Twitter followers made the news of "Quantico" and her character Alex Parrish trend worldwide on Twitter.

Add "Mentalist" and "NCIS: Los Angeles" veteran Aunjanue Ellis as Alex Parrish's handler, and you have not only a minority-led show, but a badass-woman-led show as well.

"The Frankenstein Code"

Plot summary: A modern reimagining of the Mary Shelley classic about a man brought back to life by two scientists playing god.

Joining Robert Kazinsky (who you may remember from "True Blood") in the lead role as the most attractive Frankenstein to ever exist (probably) are his on-screen creators, actor Adhir Kalyan (previously known as David Spade's assistant "Rules of Engagement" — quite a promotion) and actress Dilshad Vadsaria (who you may recognize as Nolan Ross's ex from the recently cancelled "Revenge").

The Frankenstein story hinges on the relationship between monster and creator, so it'll be interesting to see how the story plays out in a modern context.

"Rosewood"

Plot summary: Meet Dr. Beaumont Rosewood Jr., the most brilliant private pathologist in Miami, who uses his wildly sophisticated autopsy lab to perform for-hire autopsies to uncover clues that the Miami Police Department can't see. His new partner in crime is Detective Villa, a Miami PD detective with attitude and demons to spare.

Among the new crop of police procedurals coming at us this fall is this new one starring Morris Chestnut, formerly of "Nurse Jackie."

It's so refreshing to see that in this crime show, the sidekick is a minority as well as the lead. Agent Villa is played by newcomer Jaina Lee Ortiz, and their chemistry reminds me of ABC's "Castle." Let's hope this one lasts multiple seasons as well!

The television landscape is changing for the better. With new offerings like these three, I'm excited for the future.

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