Here are 3 of the newest TV shows to add more diversity to American entertainment.

Last season's "Empire," "Sleepy Hollow," and "How to Get Away With Murder" showed television executives that people of color not only can lead interesting programming, but they can lead programming that interests white people as well.

Now, there is a new crop of minority-led programming that will greet us this fall. Here are some of the most promising offerings.


"Quantico"

Plot summary: A diverse group of recruits has arrived at the FBI Quantico Base for training. They are the best, the brightest, and the most vetted, so it seems impossible that one of them is suspected of masterminding the biggest attack on New York City since 9/11.

The great thing about this show is that it's led by an entertainment veteran (and if you watch Bollywood movies, you know who she is). Actress and former Miss World India Priyanka Chopra is so famous internationally that her nearly 10 million Twitter followers made the news of "Quantico" and her character Alex Parrish trend worldwide on Twitter.

Add "Mentalist" and "NCIS: Los Angeles" veteran Aunjanue Ellis as Alex Parrish's handler, and you have not only a minority-led show, but a badass-woman-led show as well.

"The Frankenstein Code"

Plot summary: A modern reimagining of the Mary Shelley classic about a man brought back to life by two scientists playing god.

Joining Robert Kazinsky (who you may remember from "True Blood") in the lead role as the most attractive Frankenstein to ever exist (probably) are his on-screen creators, actor Adhir Kalyan (previously known as David Spade's assistant "Rules of Engagement" — quite a promotion) and actress Dilshad Vadsaria (who you may recognize as Nolan Ross's ex from the recently cancelled "Revenge").

The Frankenstein story hinges on the relationship between monster and creator, so it'll be interesting to see how the story plays out in a modern context.

"Rosewood"

Plot summary: Meet Dr. Beaumont Rosewood Jr., the most brilliant private pathologist in Miami, who uses his wildly sophisticated autopsy lab to perform for-hire autopsies to uncover clues that the Miami Police Department can't see. His new partner in crime is Detective Villa, a Miami PD detective with attitude and demons to spare.

Among the new crop of police procedurals coming at us this fall is this new one starring Morris Chestnut, formerly of "Nurse Jackie."

It's so refreshing to see that in this crime show, the sidekick is a minority as well as the lead. Agent Villa is played by newcomer Jaina Lee Ortiz, and their chemistry reminds me of ABC's "Castle." Let's hope this one lasts multiple seasons as well!

The television landscape is changing for the better. With new offerings like these three, I'm excited for the future.

Naomi Osaka was only 20 years old when she won the U.S. Open tournament, and she is the first Asian player to hold the highest singles ranking. The tennis star moved to the U.S. from Japan at age three and she has held both Japanese and American citizenship.

Her U.S. citizenship has been a topic of discussion as the Japanese exemption that allows her to hold both passports expired at age 22—which Osaka turned in 2019. At that time, she announced she would choose to give up her U.S. citizenship to keep her Japanese citizenship and compete for Japan in the 2020 Olympics. However, Osaka has said that she feels "more like a global citizen" than one particular nationality—a sentiment supported by her latest endeavor.

In partnership with Nike and Laureus Sport for Good, Osaka launched a program to support girls in sports in Japan last year. Her Play Academy is committed to leveling the playing field for girls through physical play and sports, giving girls opportunities and encouragement to get moving.

Now, she is expanding Play Academy to Los Angeles, where she currently lives and trains, as well as to Haiti, where her father is from.

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Courtesy of CeraVe
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"I love being a nurse because I have the honor of connecting with my patients during some of their best and some of their worst days and making a difference in their lives is among the most rewarding things that I can do in my own life" - Tenesia Richards, RN

From ushering new life into the world to holding the hand of a patient as they take their last breath, nurses are everyday heroes that deserve our respect and appreciation.

To give back to this community that is always giving so selflessly to others, CeraVe® put out a call to nurses to share their stories for a chance to be featured in Heroes Behind the Masks, a digital content series shining a light on nurses who go above and beyond to provide safe and quality care to patients and their communities.

First up: Tenesia Richards, a labor and delivery nurse working in New York City who, in addition to her regular job, started a community outreach program in a homeless shelter that houses expectant mothers for up to one year postpartum.

Tenesia | Heroes Behind the Masks presented by CeraVe www.youtube.com

Upon learning at a conference that black mothers in the U.S. die at three to four times the rate of white mothers, one of the widest of all racial disparities in women's health, Richards decided to take further action to help her community. She, along with a handful of fellow nurses, volunteered to provide antepartum, childbirth and postpartum education to the women living at the shelter. Additionally, they looked for other ways to boost the spirits of the residents, like throwing baby showers and bringing in guest speakers. When COVID-19 hit and in-person gatherings were no longer possible, Richards and her team found creative workarounds and created holiday care packages for the mothers instead.

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