Here are 3 of the newest TV shows to add more diversity to American entertainment.

Last season's "Empire," "Sleepy Hollow," and "How to Get Away With Murder" showed television executives that people of color not only can lead interesting programming, but they can lead programming that interests white people as well.

Now, there is a new crop of minority-led programming that will greet us this fall. Here are some of the most promising offerings.


"Quantico"

Plot summary: A diverse group of recruits has arrived at the FBI Quantico Base for training. They are the best, the brightest, and the most vetted, so it seems impossible that one of them is suspected of masterminding the biggest attack on New York City since 9/11.

The great thing about this show is that it's led by an entertainment veteran (and if you watch Bollywood movies, you know who she is). Actress and former Miss World India Priyanka Chopra is so famous internationally that her nearly 10 million Twitter followers made the news of "Quantico" and her character Alex Parrish trend worldwide on Twitter.

Add "Mentalist" and "NCIS: Los Angeles" veteran Aunjanue Ellis as Alex Parrish's handler, and you have not only a minority-led show, but a badass-woman-led show as well.

"The Frankenstein Code"

Plot summary: A modern reimagining of the Mary Shelley classic about a man brought back to life by two scientists playing god.

Joining Robert Kazinsky (who you may remember from "True Blood") in the lead role as the most attractive Frankenstein to ever exist (probably) are his on-screen creators, actor Adhir Kalyan (previously known as David Spade's assistant "Rules of Engagement" — quite a promotion) and actress Dilshad Vadsaria (who you may recognize as Nolan Ross's ex from the recently cancelled "Revenge").

The Frankenstein story hinges on the relationship between monster and creator, so it'll be interesting to see how the story plays out in a modern context.

"Rosewood"

Plot summary: Meet Dr. Beaumont Rosewood Jr., the most brilliant private pathologist in Miami, who uses his wildly sophisticated autopsy lab to perform for-hire autopsies to uncover clues that the Miami Police Department can't see. His new partner in crime is Detective Villa, a Miami PD detective with attitude and demons to spare.

Among the new crop of police procedurals coming at us this fall is this new one starring Morris Chestnut, formerly of "Nurse Jackie."

It's so refreshing to see that in this crime show, the sidekick is a minority as well as the lead. Agent Villa is played by newcomer Jaina Lee Ortiz, and their chemistry reminds me of ABC's "Castle." Let's hope this one lasts multiple seasons as well!

The television landscape is changing for the better. With new offerings like these three, I'm excited for the future.

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ZACHOR Foundation

"What's 'the Holocaust'?" my 11-year-old son asks me. I take a deep breath as I gauge how much to tell him. He's old enough to understand that prejudice can lead to hatred, but I can't help but feel he's too young to hear about the full spectrum of human horror that hatred can lead to.

I wrestle with that thought, considering the conversation I recently had with Ben Lesser, a 91-year-old Holocaust survivor who was just a little younger than my son when he witnessed his first Nazi atrocity.

It was September of 1939 and the Blitzkrieg occupation of Poland had just begun. Ben, his parents, and his siblings were awakened in their Krakow apartment by Nazi soldiers who pistol-whipped them out of bed and ransacked their home. As the men with the shiny black boots filled burlap sacks with the Jewish family's valuables, a scream came from the apartment across the hall. Ben and his sister ran toward the cry.

They found a Nazi swinging their neighbors' baby upside down by its legs, demanding that the baby's mother make it stop crying. As the parents screamed, "My baby! My baby!" the Nazi smirked—then swung the baby's head full force into the door frame, killing it instantly.

This story and others like it feel too terrible to tell my young son, too out of context from his life of relative safety and security. And yet Ben Lesser lived it at my son's age. And it was too terrible—for anyone, much less a 10-year-old. And it was also completely out of context from the life of relative safety and security Ben and his family had known before the Nazi tanks rolled in.

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In 1945, the world had just endured the bloodiest war in history. World leaders were determined to not repeat the mistakes of the past. They wanted to build a better future, one free from the "scourge of war" so they signed the UN Charter — creating a global organization of nations that could deter and repel aggressors, mediate conflicts and broker armistices, and ensure collective progress.

Over the following 75 years, the UN played an essential role in preventing, mitigating or resolving conflicts all over the world. It faced new challenges and new threats — including the spread of nuclear weapons and other weapons of mass destruction, a Cold War and brutal civil wars, transnational terrorism and genocides. Today, the UN faces new tensions: shifting and more hostile geopolitics, digital weaponization, a global pandemic, and more.

This slideshow shows how the UN has worked to build peace and security around the world:

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Malians wait in line at a free clinic run by the UN Multidimensional Integrated Mission in Mali in 2014. Over their 75 year history, UN peacekeepers have deployed around the world in military and nonmilitary roles as they work towards human security and peace. Here's a look back at their history.

Photo credit: UN Photo/Marco Dormino

With many schools going virtual, many daycare facilities being closed or limited, and millions of parents working from home during the pandemic, the balance working moms have always struggled to achieve has become even more challenging in 2020. Though there are more women in the workforce than ever, women still take on the lion's share of household and childcare duties. Moms also tend to bear the mental load of keeping track of all the little details that keep family life running smoothly, from noticing when kids are outgrowing their clothing to keeping track of doctor and dentist appointments to organizing kids' extracurricular activities.

It's a lot. And it's a lot more now that we're also dealing with the daily existential dread of a global pandemic, social unrest, political upheaval, and increasingly intense natural disasters.

That's why scientist Gretchen Goldman's refreshingly honest photo showing where and how she conducted a CNN interview is resonating with so many.

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Same-sex marriage is legal in America and these days 63% of all Americans support the idea. Ten years ago, it was still a controversial issue among Democrats, but in 2019, 79% say they support same-sex marriage.

The issue played a big role in the Democratic primary for the Delaware's House of Representatives 27th district race. On September 15, Eric Morrison defeated incumbent Earl Jacques in a landslide and gay rights was a central issue.

In 2013, Jaques voted against same-sex marriage and refused to vote yes or no on banning gay conversion therapy in the state. On the other hand, Morrison is a gay drag queen who performs under the name Anita Mann and is very progressive on LGBTQ issues.

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