Photo courtesy of Claudia Romo Edelman
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When the novel coronavirus hit the United States, life as we knew it quickly changed. As many people holed up in their homes, some essential workers had to make the impossible choice of going to work or quitting their jobs— a choice they continue to make each day.

Because over 80 percent of working Hispanic adults provide essential services for the U.S. economy, the Hispanic community is disproportionately affected. Hispanic families are also much more likely to live in multigenerational households, carrying the extra risk of infecting the most vulnerable. In fact, Hispanics are 20 times more likely than other patients to test positive for COVID-19.

Claudia Romo Edelman saw a community in desperate need of guidance and support. And she created Hispanic Star, a non-profit designed to help Hispanic people in the U.S. pull together as a proud, unified group and overcome barriers — the most pressing of which is the effects of the pandemic.

Because the Hispanic community is so diverse, unification is, and was, an enormous challenge.

Photo credit: Hispanic Star

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Ever wonder what happened to the real people who appeared in a fake documentary? They don't always have to cope with the aftermath of public humilation.

Jeanise Jones was told she would be participating in a documentary about child brides and women's rights. What she actually ended up appearing in was "Borat Subsequent Moviefilm," the sequel to 2006's Borat. Now, a GoFundMe for the Oklahoma grandmother set up by her pastor has raised over $130,000 after Jones told Variety she was only paid $3,600 for her appearance.

If you don't remember Jones, she was the woman tasked with babysitting Borat's daughter, Tutar, while Borat (played by Sacha Baron Cohen) attempted to make money for his daughter's plastic surgery.

"I can't say it was fair because they knew it was going to be a movie, and I didn't. I just thought I was doing a documentary about how we do things in America. But I blame myself for not reading when I signed those papers," Jones told Variety. The GoFundMe was set up after Jones lost her job of 32 years due to the pandemic.

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Photo courtesy of Claudia Romo Edelman
True

When the novel coronavirus hit the United States, life as we knew it quickly changed. As many people holed up in their homes, some essential workers had to make the impossible choice of going to work or quitting their jobs— a choice they continue to make each day.

Because over 80 percent of working Hispanic adults provide essential services for the U.S. economy, the Hispanic community is disproportionately affected. Hispanic families are also much more likely to live in multigenerational households, carrying the extra risk of infecting the most vulnerable. In fact, Hispanics are 20 times more likely than other patients to test positive for COVID-19.

Claudia Romo Edelman saw a community in desperate need of guidance and support. And she created Hispanic Star, a non-profit designed to help Hispanic people in the U.S. pull together as a proud, unified group and overcome barriers — the most pressing of which is the effects of the pandemic.

Because the Hispanic community is so diverse, unification is, and was, an enormous challenge.

Photo credit: Hispanic Star

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Electing Donald Trump to be president of the United States set an incredibly ugly example for the nation's youth.

We know how it's affected the national discourse of regular adults. But there's no denying the conduct of a president impacts how children around the world see the example being set for them. Every day for the past four years, children have been subjected to the behavior of a divisive figure that many of their parents chose to exalt to the most powerful office in the world.

Sure, adults can make excuses for him saying he's an "imperfect messenger" or that they "didn't vote for him to be reverend," but these are all just ways to rationalize voting for a man with zero character. What a message to send to children: Act awful and you'll be handsomely rewarded.

But what if you took away the "Trump" name and examined the character traits of him as an ordinary person? More specifically, what if your daughter came to you and said this was the kind of person she was planning to date? Well, one MAGA family found out and the results are funny, insightful and quite revealing about how we somehow hold our leaders to different and lower standards than we expect from ourselves in our day to day lives.

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2020 has definitely, for sure, without a doubt, been the strangest year we as a society have collectively lived through. And it's not even close. Remember when we all thought 2016 was a doozy? How adorable were we then?

We've all worked on ways to cope through the upheaval of a global pandemic, the intensity of social unrest, the chaos of political insanity, and the uncertainty of what comes next. Some of us are dealing with the loss of loved ones, unemployment and financial stress, helping our kids navigate virtual schooling, and the mental health toll all of this is taking.

Considering all of that, most of us can use all the help we can get in the coping department.

Perhaps that's why the "Keep Going Song" from The Bengsons—a husband-wife musical duo—is resonating with so many people. The song, which they says is "meant as a gesture of love, a try, a fail, a blessing, way to be gentle," is quirky, funny, alternatingly silly and profound, and overall just thoroughly delightful. In between the catchy "Keep going on song" choruses, Abigail Bengson speaks and sings a seemingly spontaneous narrative while Shaun Bengson plays a simple guitar riff in the background, and it all works in a weird and wonderful way.

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