Ellen used 'Finding Dory' to send a vital message to Trump about immigration.

On Jan. 27, 2017, President Donald Trump signed an executive order banning travel from seven predominantly Muslim countries. The order came just days after proposing tariffs on Mexican imports to pay for an (unpopular) border wall with our southern neighbor.

Photo by Ron Sachs - Pool/Getty Images.


The travel ban, which barred refugees and green card holders, was far-reaching and deemed unconstitutional or illegal by many — including Attorney General Sally Yates, who was fired shortly after announcing that she would not enforce the ban.

The very next day, the president held a screening of the film "Finding Dory" for White House staff and their families.

Cute, huh?

When Ellen DeGeneres, who voices the film's titular forgetful fish, heard about the screening, she decided to bring it up on her talk show.

"On Friday, the president gave an order banning people from seven countries from entering the United States," she explained. "Then on Saturday [Jan. 28], the president screened 'Finding Dory' at the White House. I don’t get political, but I will say that I am against one of those two things."

Photo by Jason Kempin/Getty Images.

DeGeneres — in completely "nonpolitical" fashion, of course — then explained to her audience the plot of "Finding Dory," which felt eerily familiar:

"Dory arrives in America with her friends, Marlin and Nemo, and she ends up at the Marine Life Institute behind a large wall. And they all have to get over the wall. You won’t believe it, but that wall has almost no effect in keeping them out."

...Yeah, that doesn't sound at all similar to what Trump has promised to do along the American-Mexican border...

Photo by Joshua Lott/AFP/Getty Images.

"Even though Dory gets into America, she ends up separated from her family. But the other animals help Dory — animals that don’t even need her, animals that don’t even have anything in common with her."

... The travel ban must be a coincidence ...

Photo by Justin Sullivan/Getty Images.

"They help her even though they’re completely different colors, because that’s what you do when you see someone in need," DeGeneres continued.

Photo by Scott Olson/Getty Images.

"You help them."

Photo by Scott Eisen/Getty Images.

"That is what I hope everyone who's watching 'Finding Dory' has learned," DeGeneres concluded.

As Dory's story reminds us, sometimes it's best we revisit the simple lessons we learned as kids to help us figure out what to do during complex crises as adults.

Millions of men, women, and children have been displaced by war in Syria. They lack access to even the most basic of necessities, like food, water, and shelter — not to mention other vital services, like counseling and attending school. They desperately need our help.

While sometimes the best thing to do when times get tough is to "just keep swimming," sometimes we all need a leg up. For refugees around the world, that time is now.

Watch DeGeneres' totally non-political explainer of "Finding Dory" below:

Most Shared
Photo by Hunters Race on Unsplash

If you're a woman and you want to be a CEO, you should probably think about changing your name to "Jeffrey" or "Michael." Or possibly even "Michael Jeffreys" or "Jeffrey Michaels."

According to Fortune, last year, more men named Jeffrey and Michael became CEOs of America's top companies than women. A whopping total of one woman became a CEO, while two men named Jeffrey took the title, and two men named Michael moved into the C-suite as well.

The "New CEO Report" for 2018, which looks at new CEOS for the 250 largest S&P 500 companies, found that 23 people were appointed to the position of CEO. Only one of those 23 people was a woman. Michelle Gass, the new CEO of Kohl's, was the lone female on the list.

Keep Reading Show less
popular

Netflix

How much of what we do is influenced by what we see on TV? When it comes to risky behavior, Netflix isn't taking any chances.

After receiving a lot of heat, the streaming platform is finally removing a controversial scenedepicting teen suicide in season one of "13 Reasons Why. The decision comes two years after the show's release after statistics reveal an uptick in teen suicide.

"As we prepare to launch season three later this summer, we've been mindful about the ongoing debate around the show. So on the advice of medical experts, including Dr. Christine Moutier, Chief Medical Officer at the American Foundation for Suicide Prevention, we've decided with creator Brian Yorkey and the producers to edit the scene in which Hannah takes her own life from season one," Netflix said in a statement, per The Hollywood Reporter.

Keep Reading Show less
Culture

At Trump's 'Social Media Summit' on Thursday, he bizarrely claimed Arnold Schwarzenegger had 'died' and he had witnessed said death. Wait, what?!


He didn't mean it literally - thank God. You can't be too sure! After all, he seemed to think that Frederick Douglass was still alive in February. More recently, he described a world in which the 1770s included airports. His laissez-faire approach to chronology is confusing, to say the least.

Keep Reading Show less
Democracy

Words matter. And they especially matter when we are talking about the safety and well-being of children.

While the #MeToo movement has shed light on sexual assault allegations that have long been swept under the rug, it has also brought to the forefront the language we use when discussing such cases. As a writer, I appreciate the importance of using varied wording, but it's vital we try to remain as accurate as possible in how we describe things.

There can be gray area in some topics, but some phrases being published by the media regarding sexual predation are not gray and need to be nixed completely—not only because they dilute the severity of the crime, but because they are simply inaccurate by definition.

One such phrase is "non-consensual sex with a minor." First of all, non-consensual sex is "rape" no matter who is involved. Second of all, most minors legally cannot consent to sex (the age of consent in the U.S. ranges by state from 16 to 18), so sex with a minor is almost always non-consensual by definition. Call it what it is—child rape or statutory rape, depending on circumstances—not "non-consensual sex."

Keep Reading Show less
Culture