Divorcee's heartfelt ‘moving out’ post on Craigslist is giving people all the feels.

Photo by Dia Dipasupil / Getty Images

“Live. Hurt. Heal. Repeat. New York City is no longer for me; I’ve done what I came here to do. I’ve grown up and I've outgrown it and now I’m tired of stepping over shed skin,” Jessica Ciencin Henriquez wrote in a Craigslist post for her ‘Moving Out is Hard to Do Sale’ happening in June.

Two years ago, writer and editor Henriquez divorced actor Josh Lucas and moved into an apartment with her six-year-old son. Now, she’s leaving the city, but not without one final goodbye to the possessions that are intimately linked to her relationship.

Henrququez’s dramatic, revealing descriptions of the items she’s selling are connecting with people because they show how emotional memories are projected onto our belongings, even when it’s time to move on.


via Craigslist

“No sex was had in this bed,” she wrote in a description for her queen-sized mattress. “I bought it at the beginning of my year of celibacy."

“I believed that maybe I could start over with another someone who was capable of loving me like I deserved to be loved,” she added. “Anyway, this mattress has no stains, no damage, and the tears have dried.”

via Craigslist

“I brought it home when I was seven months pregnant,” she said in a description for a rocking chair. “The father and I went to the store, determined to choose the perfect furniture for our first (and only) child."

“We walked up every aisle and sat in each option they had, laughing at how seriously we were taking this one task,” she added. “But that baby grew up, and that marriage ended. I can no longer justify dragging this beast of a rocking chair from house to house.”

via Shixagug / Pixabay

“For years, I had only one coffee mug,” Henriquez wrote in an ad for a set of four coffee mugs. “A friend came over one day and laughed at the single mug in my cabinet and then forced me to order more from Amazon. ‘There will be other people in your life that drink coffee, hun.’ That’s what she said. Hun.”

via Craigslist

“I sat my son on top of this table and let him play with matchbox cars because he said please with the sweet voice he knows will break any rules I’ve made,” she writes while describing a mid-century modern dining table.

“Also because I’m a cool mom and cool moms don’t mind someone sitting on the table and playing with cars because cool moms are too busy figuring out how to rebuild their lives to worry about little things. There’s now scratches on the table top, I imagine they’re easy to fix, but I’ll never know because I’ll never bother trying.”

According to the BBC, Henriquez was bombarded with over 900 messages after the posting went live. “People are connecting with the notion that the things that we own come with a story,” the writer told the BBC. "They're connecting with what it means to move on and start over.

“I couldn't imagine listing those things without capturing the importance of how they helped me to reclaim my life,” she said.

You can read the entire Craigslist post here.

More

The great thing about American democracy is the separation of powers. The federal government has rights, states have rights, counties have rights, cities have rights, and we, as people, have rights, too.

Heck, even animals have some rights in the good ol' U S of A.

The president of the United States is not a king or a dictator so a team of U.S. mayors, led by Los Angeles Mayor Eric Garcetti, are asking to go over his head to negotiate directly at next month's UN climate change conference in Santiago, Chile.

Keep Reading Show less
popular
Facebook / Amanda Williams

It can take time to feel comfortable in a new home, especially if you think there are scary monsters lurking about, which is why six-year-old Hayden Williams had trouble sleeping in his new room.

Hayden used to share a room with his 15-year-old sister, but when the Eldridge, Iowa family moved, each kid got their very own. While his sister was excited for the change, Hayden was having a hard time adjusting to the new arrangement.

"My little man has been having severe anxiety since we moved into the new house…I've tried everything under the sun to get him to sleep in his own room. Nothing is helping," his mom, Amanda Williams, wrote on Facebook.

Keep Reading Show less
popular
Courtesy of Capital One

It was around Christmas 2018 and Jean Simpkins, 79, was looking out the window of her new three-bedroom apartment. Eleven floors above Washington, D.C., the grandmother of two gazed out at the lights of the city and became overwhelmed with gratitude. "The only thing I could say," Simpkins remembers, "was 'Thank you, Father.'"

Almost a year later, Simpkins still can't help but look at the apartment as a miracle — one she desperately needed. Fifteen years ago, when her grandson was born, she became his primary caregiver. Six years later, when her granddaughter was four, Simpkins was awarded full custody of her, too. She's spent the time since trying to give her grandchildren the life she knows they deserve, which has been difficult on a fixed income. On top of that, Simpkins worried that the neighborhood the family resided in wasn't the best influence on her kids. Something had to change.

Then she learned about Plaza West, a new development created by Mission First housing that would reserve 50 of its apartments specifically for families in which a grandparent or other older adult was raising children who were related to them. The waiting list, Simpkins says, was daunting. There are a great deal of grandfamilies in the D.C. area and she was sure it might be years before she got the call. But soon after applying, she was offered a choice between a two-bedroom and a three-bedroom apartment. She accepted the latter, sight unseen. She knew that each of her grandchildren needed space of their own.

Keep Reading Show less
Future Edge
True
Capital One
via Pixabay

Ninjas are black-clad assassins that date back to the days of feudal Japan. They are skillful, secretive fighters who have mastered the element of surprise, espionage, and clandestine tactics.

Ninjas weren't held to the Bushido code like the samurai, so they could be mercenaries who did the lord's dirty deeds without worrying about their honor. A ninja's most important power is the ability to be stealth and sneak into castles or homes to take their targets by surprise.

Keep Reading Show less
popular