Photo by Tony Ranze/Getty Images

This summer, the Happiest Place on Earth will get a lot more inclusive… and magical.

Disney will host the theme park’s first-ever official Pride event at Disneyland Paris on June 1st, the first day of Pride Month. The Magical Pride Party, as it is known as, will welcome members of the LGBTQ community and friends, encouraging patrons to, according to their website, “Dress like a dream, feel fabulous and experience Walt Disney Studios Park like never before – loud, proud and alive with all the colours of the rainbow.”

The first unofficial Magic Pride event took place in Paris in 2014, but now Disney has taken over due to its popularity.

The Magic Pride Party will include dance parties, live performances, late night access to the park, and a pride parade called Magical March of Diversity Parade. Popular Disney characters will be “out and about” as well. Special packages are available for members of the LGBTQ community and their friends and family.


Unofficially, Disneyworld and Disneyland have had Gay Days since in the 1990s, but there has never been an officially sanctioned LGBTQ event until now.

Gay Days Anaheim is held in October, while Gay Days Orlando is held in August. The first event took place in 1991, when approximately 3,000 gays and lesbians attended Disneyworld wearing red shirts to make their presence known. It has since grown to a six-day event drawing nearly 180,000 people.

Quinn Dombrowski/Flickr

Disney has stated that inclusion is important to the company.

“Diversity and equality are strong values at Disneyland Paris, and each year, we host millions of visitors regardless of their origins, gender or sexual orientation,” a Walt Disney spokesperson told NBC News. “We are committed to fostering a welcoming environment for all of our Guests where magic is for everyone.”

Last year, Disney began selling a rainbow version of their iconic Mickey Mouse ears. In 2007, Disney allowed same-sex couples to marry at Cinderella’s castle.

Their Fairy Tale Wedding program had only been open to couples who had a valid marriage license. At the time, same-sex marriage was not legal, but Disney allowed those couples to marry regardless. "We believe this change is consistent with Disney's long-standing policy of welcoming every guest in an inclusive environment," Disney Parks and Resorts spokesman Donn Walker told CBS News of the decision. "We want everyone who comes to celebrate a special occasion at Disney to feel welcome and respected."

Disney has been known for making magic, but the Magical Pride Party is taking it to a whole new level! Bienvenue à Paris!

Photo by Picsea on Unsplash
True

It is said that once you've seen something, you can't unsee it. This is exactly what is happening in America right now. We have collectively watched the pot of racial tension boil over after years of looking the other way, insisting that hot water doesn't exist, pretending not to notice the smoke billowing out from every direction.

Ignoring a problem doesn't make it go away—it prolongs resolution. There's a whole lot of harm to be remedied and damage to be repaired as a result of racial injustice, and it's up to all of us to figure out how to do that. Parents, in particular, are recognizing the importance of raising anti-racist children; if we are unable to completely eradicate racism, maybe the next generation will.

How can parents ensure that the next generation will actively refuse to perpetuate systems and behaviors embedded in racism? The most obvious answer is to model it. Take for example, professional tennis player Serena Williams and her husband, Reddit co-founder Alexis Ohanian.

Keep Reading Show less

Believe it or not, there has been a lot of controversy lately about how people cook rice. According to CNN, the "outrage" was a reaction to a clip Malaysian comedian Nigel Ng posted as one of his personas known as Uncle Roger.

It was a hilarious (and harmless) satire about the method chef Hersha Patel used to cook rice on the show BBC Food.


Keep Reading Show less
Photo by Picsea on Unsplash
True

It is said that once you've seen something, you can't unsee it. This is exactly what is happening in America right now. We have collectively watched the pot of racial tension boil over after years of looking the other way, insisting that hot water doesn't exist, pretending not to notice the smoke billowing out from every direction.

Ignoring a problem doesn't make it go away—it prolongs resolution. There's a whole lot of harm to be remedied and damage to be repaired as a result of racial injustice, and it's up to all of us to figure out how to do that. Parents, in particular, are recognizing the importance of raising anti-racist children; if we are unable to completely eradicate racism, maybe the next generation will.

How can parents ensure that the next generation will actively refuse to perpetuate systems and behaviors embedded in racism? The most obvious answer is to model it. Take for example, professional tennis player Serena Williams and her husband, Reddit co-founder Alexis Ohanian.

Keep Reading Show less
Photo by Mahir Uysal on Unsplash

Two years ago, I got off the phone after an interview and cried my eyes out. I'd just spent an hour talking to Tim Ballard, the founder of Operation Underground Railroad, an organization that helps fight child sex trafficking, and I just couldn't take it.

Ballard told me about how the training to go undercover as a child predator nearly broke him. He told me an eerie story of a trafficker who could totally compartmentalize, showing Ballard photos of kids he had for sale, then switching gears to proudly show him a photo of his own daughter on her bicycle, just as any parent would. He told me about how lucrative child trafficking is—how a child can bring in three or four times as much as a female prostitute—and how Americans are the industry's biggest consumers.

Keep Reading Show less

You can put this one in the "win column" for those who believe in equal pay. Leslie Odom Jr. took a stand and was not going to settle for anything other than what was fair.

The Hamilton star, who won a Tony Award for his portrayal of Aaron Burr in the most successful musical in modern history, simply sought a similar wage to white actors who had comparable roles in other musicals. As he explained to Dax Shepard on his podcast Armchair Expert, they did not contact his agent at CAA until after the announcement of the shows filming. When the offer finally came, it was disappointing.


Keep Reading Show less