Cheryl Cole was removed from Madame Tussauds for the most 21st-century reason
Instagram / Cheryl

Madame Tussauds in London houses a veritable zoo of lifelike waxworks of the influential and famous. Being enshrined in wax at Madame Tussauds is a sign that you made it. Being removed from the museum… not so much.

The waxy likeness of former Girls Aloud singer Cheryl Cole (who now just goes by Cheryl) was taken out of the famed museum. One of the metrics Madame Tussauds uses to determine the fate of a statue is if people are taking selfies with it. Unfortunately, people weren't posing with Cheryl as much as they used to, and the museum decided to axe the wax. This is the 21st century where much of our fate is determined by Instagram.

When wax mannequin Cheryl first went on display in 2010, she was a popular attraction. The figure was even updated a few times to reflect the changes in the singer's appearance. In 2014, her tiara and glittery red gown was swapped out for a glittery gold top and black pants. Her loose waves were styled into an updo, and they added replicas of the rings Cheryl's ex-husband Jean-Bernard Fernandez-Versini gave her.


RELATED: Michelle Branch posted a breastfeeding photo from her wedding day, because brides multitask

Cheryl is still relatively obscure in the states, but she was a huge star in Britain in the 2000s. She was part of the popular girl group Girls Aloud, and she became the first British female solo artist to have five number-one singles. Up until 2018, she also held the record for the British female solo artist with the most number-one singles in the U.K. She was even a judge on the "X Factor." So, yeah. She was a big deal.

Recently, her singles haven't been doing well on the charts, and L'Oreal ended their nine-year contract with Cheryl. Then, Madam Tussauds decided to stop displaying her waxwork.

"Our Cheryl figure is currently being stored in the London archives," a representative of Madam Tussauds told the Sun. "This isn't uncommon for our figures, as from time to time we do change who we have in the attraction. We are constantly reviewing our collection of figures to best represent what our visitors want to see."

RELATED: The viral homeless opera singer just made her debut stage performance and it's incredible

To add insult on injury, replicas of her former fellow "X Factor" judges are still on display in the museum. Likenesses of Simon Cowell, Sharon Osbourne, and Louis Walsh reside in the halls of Madam Tussauds. A likeness of her ex-boyfriend, One Direction singer Liam Payne, lives there as well.

It's hard not to feel like this is one big metaphor for the 21st century. You can be a record holding powerhouse, but if you're not getting social media attention, it's time to pack you up and put you in storage.

Images courtesy of John Scully, Walden University, Ingrid Scully
True

Since March of 2020, over 29 million Americans have been diagnosed with COVID-19, according to the CDC. Over 540,000 have died in the United States as this unprecedented pandemic has swept the globe. And yet, by the end of 2020, it looked like science was winning: vaccines had been developed.

In celebration of the power of science we spoke to three people: an individual, a medical provider, and a vaccine scientist about how vaccines have impacted them throughout their lives. Here are their answers:

John Scully, 79, resident of Florida

Photo courtesy of John Scully

When John Scully was born, America was in the midst of an epidemic: tens of thousands of children in the United States were falling ill with paralytic poliomyelitis — otherwise known as polio, a disease that attacks the central nervous system and often leaves its victims partially or fully paralyzed.

"As kids, we were all afraid of getting polio," he says, "because if you got polio, you could end up in the dreaded iron lung and we were all terrified of those." Iron lungs were respirators that enclosed most of a person's body; people with severe cases often would end up in these respirators as they fought for their lives.

John remembers going to see matinee showings of cowboy movies on Saturdays and, before the movie, shorts would run. "Usually they showed the news," he says, "but I just remember seeing this one clip warning us about polio and it just showed all these kids in iron lungs." If kids survived the iron lung, they'd often come back to school on crutches, in leg braces, or in wheelchairs.

"We all tried to be really careful in the summer — or, as we called it back then, 'polio season,''" John says. This was because every year around Memorial Day, major outbreaks would begin to emerge and they'd spike sometime around August. People weren't really sure how the disease spread at the time, but many believed it traveled through the water. There was no cure — and every child was susceptible to getting sick with it.

"We couldn't swim in hot weather," he remembers, "and the municipal outdoor pool would close down in August."

Then, in 1954 clinical trials began for Dr. Jonas Salk's vaccine against polio and within a year, his vaccine was announced safe. "I got that vaccine at school," John says. Within two years, U.S. polio cases had dropped 85-95 percent — even before a second vaccine was developed by Dr. Albert Sabin in the 1960s. "I remember how much better things got after the vaccines came out. They changed everything," John says.

Keep Reading Show less

Simon & Garfunkel's song "Bridge Over Troubled Water" has been covered by more than 50 different musical artists, from Aretha Franklin to Elvis Presley to Willie Nelson. It's a timeless classic that taps into the universal struggle of feeling down and the comfort of having someone to lift us up. It's beloved for its soothing melody and cathartic lyrics, and after a year of pandemic challenges, it's perhaps more poignant now than ever.

A few years a go, American singer-songwriter Yebba Smith shared a solo a capella version of a part of "Bridge Over Troubled Water," in which she just casually sits and sings it on a bed. It's an impressive rendition on its own, highlighting Yebba's soulful, effortless voice.

But British singer Jacob Collier recently added his own layered harmony tracks to it, taking the performance to a whole other level.

Keep Reading Show less
Images courtesy of John Scully, Walden University, Ingrid Scully
True

Since March of 2020, over 29 million Americans have been diagnosed with COVID-19, according to the CDC. Over 540,000 have died in the United States as this unprecedented pandemic has swept the globe. And yet, by the end of 2020, it looked like science was winning: vaccines had been developed.

In celebration of the power of science we spoke to three people: an individual, a medical provider, and a vaccine scientist about how vaccines have impacted them throughout their lives. Here are their answers:

John Scully, 79, resident of Florida

Photo courtesy of John Scully

When John Scully was born, America was in the midst of an epidemic: tens of thousands of children in the United States were falling ill with paralytic poliomyelitis — otherwise known as polio, a disease that attacks the central nervous system and often leaves its victims partially or fully paralyzed.

"As kids, we were all afraid of getting polio," he says, "because if you got polio, you could end up in the dreaded iron lung and we were all terrified of those." Iron lungs were respirators that enclosed most of a person's body; people with severe cases often would end up in these respirators as they fought for their lives.

John remembers going to see matinee showings of cowboy movies on Saturdays and, before the movie, shorts would run. "Usually they showed the news," he says, "but I just remember seeing this one clip warning us about polio and it just showed all these kids in iron lungs." If kids survived the iron lung, they'd often come back to school on crutches, in leg braces, or in wheelchairs.

"We all tried to be really careful in the summer — or, as we called it back then, 'polio season,''" John says. This was because every year around Memorial Day, major outbreaks would begin to emerge and they'd spike sometime around August. People weren't really sure how the disease spread at the time, but many believed it traveled through the water. There was no cure — and every child was susceptible to getting sick with it.

"We couldn't swim in hot weather," he remembers, "and the municipal outdoor pool would close down in August."

Then, in 1954 clinical trials began for Dr. Jonas Salk's vaccine against polio and within a year, his vaccine was announced safe. "I got that vaccine at school," John says. Within two years, U.S. polio cases had dropped 85-95 percent — even before a second vaccine was developed by Dr. Albert Sabin in the 1960s. "I remember how much better things got after the vaccines came out. They changed everything," John says.

Keep Reading Show less