via Facebook

Anti-maskers have been passing around a bogus letter they claim is from the Centers for Disease Control that says the organization "does not recommend that the general public wear N95 respirator mask to protect themselves from respiratory diseases, including coronavirus (COVID-19)."

The document also claims that N95 masks are "designed and approved for sterile environments" and that they clog "quickly" rendering them "useless."

It also says that if you come in contact with the virus the mask "traps it" and you "become a walking virus dispenser."







The letter looks official because it's printed on what appears to be CDC letterhead.



However, it is hard to read and littered with typographical errors.


via Facebook


Dr. Jason McKnight with the Texas A&M School of Medicine told KTBX why the documents is obviously fake and how to identify other misinformation campaigns online.

"One, there are very vague terms. Another thing is, if you look and actually read the context or the content, there are a lot of grammar issues and a lot of misspelled words," said McKnight.

He also said the letter was filled with falsehoods.

"As far as the surgical masks go, there's a big falsehood in this document. It says they're useless after 20 to 30 minutes and they're only meant to be used in a sterile environment. That's not exactly true either. They do serve some purpose outside of an operating room and they can be used for way longer than 20 to 30 minutes," said McKnight.

The CDC has also spoken out about the letter.

"CDC typically does not issue guidance or recommendations to the public in such a format," an agency spokesperson told The Daily Beast. It also noted that the letter being shared on social media is a printed notice, something the CDC doesn't do.

"CDC's guidance and recommendations are distributed on the agency's website, officials social media accounts, and through news media," a spokesperson added.

The CDC's website recommends that people should wear masks and that they are safe and effective.

"To reduce the spread of COVID-19, CDC recommends that people wear cloth face coverings in public settings when around people outside of their household, especially when other social distancing measures are difficult to maintain," the site reads.

At a time when there is a deadly virus running rampant, hoaxes like the fake CDC letter can kill people. Those that believe the letter and stop wearing a mask can either die of COVID-19 or unknowingly spread it to someone who does.

That's why it's so important for people to call out fake documents and conspiracies. The more people that fall for fake information the more will get sick and the longer we'll have to live on lock down.

So if you see something fake being posted online, tell the poster to take it down or report them to content moderators so the misinformation doesn't spread like the virus we're trying to contain.

via Jody Danielle Fisher / Facebook

Breast milk is an incredibly magical food. The wonderful thing is that it's produced by a collaboration between mother and baby.

British mother Jody Danielle Fisher shared the miracle of this collaboration on Facebook recently after having her 13-month-old child vaccinated.

In the post, she compared the color of her breast milk before and after the vaccination, to show how a baby's reaction to the vaccine has a direct effect on her mother's milk production.

Keep Reading Show less
Photo by Picsea on Unsplash
True

It is said that once you've seen something, you can't unsee it. This is exactly what is happening in America right now. We have collectively watched the pot of racial tension boil over after years of looking the other way, insisting that hot water doesn't exist, pretending not to notice the smoke billowing out from every direction.

Ignoring a problem doesn't make it go away—it prolongs resolution. There's a whole lot of harm to be remedied and damage to be repaired as a result of racial injustice, and it's up to all of us to figure out how to do that. Parents, in particular, are recognizing the importance of raising anti-racist children; if we are unable to completely eradicate racism, maybe the next generation will.

How can parents ensure that the next generation will actively refuse to perpetuate systems and behaviors embedded in racism? The most obvious answer is to model it. Take for example, professional tennis player Serena Williams and her husband, Reddit co-founder Alexis Ohanian.

Keep Reading Show less
Photo by Mahir Uysal on Unsplash

Two years ago, I got off the phone after an interview and cried my eyes out. I'd just spent an hour talking to Tim Ballard, the founder of Operation Underground Railroad, an organization that helps fight child sex trafficking, and I just couldn't take it.

Ballard told me about how the training to go undercover as a child predator nearly broke him. He told me an eerie story of a trafficker who could totally compartmentalize, showing Ballard photos of kids he had for sale, then switching gears to proudly show him a photo of his own daughter on her bicycle, just as any parent would. He told me about how lucrative child trafficking is—how a child can bring in three or four times as much as a female prostitute—and how Americans are the industry's biggest consumers.

Keep Reading Show less

Believe it or not, there has been a lot of controversy lately about how people cook rice. According to CNN, the "outrage" was a reaction to a clip Malaysian comedian Nigel Ng posted as one of his personas known as Uncle Roger.

It was a hilarious (and harmless) satire about the method chef Hersha Patel used to cook rice on the show BBC Food.


Keep Reading Show less