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Yesterday, Britain's Andy Murray defeated Juan Martin del Potro of Argentina in the men's singles tennis final, winning his second gold medal and setting a record in the event.  

Photo by Clive Brunskill/Getty Images.

Still, in a post-match interview with the BBC's John Inverdale, the two-time champion left no doubt as to whose (ridiculous) mark everyone in tennis is trying to chase.

Inverdale: "You're the first person to ever win two Olympic tennis gold medals. That's an extraordinary feat, isn't it?"

Murray: "Well, to defend the singles title. I think Venus and Serena have won about four each."

Murray is correct! Women are people.

Women. Photo via iStock.


And turns out, their gold medals count just as much.

Venus and Serena Williams truly have dominated the women's field at the Olympics, winning doubles gold in 2000, 2008, and 2012 (in addition to singles gold in 2000 and 2012, respectively).

Photo by Cameron Spencer/Getty Images.

While female athletes still face discrimination — including less visibility, inferior equipment, and lower earnings — women comprise nearly half of the athletes in Rio, for the first time in Olympic history.

The International Olympic Committee announced that achieving complete gender parity would be a priority for the Tokyo games in 2020, and that more more mixed-gender events — where men and women compete on teams together — could be introduced.

Standing up for his female colleagues in the game is nothing new for Murray either.

The Brit is one of few male tennis stars to work with a female coach, and he declared himself a feminist in a blog post last year, after watching his female coach endure excessive criticism in the wake of his losses.

He also wrote that he believes it's a "crying shame there aren’t more female coaches."

Congratulations, Andy Murray. And thanks for giving credit where credit is due.

Photo by Clive Brunskill/Getty Images.

With your epic win, you're halfway to being the GOAT.

Co-sleeping isn't for everyone.

The marital bed is a symbol of the intimacy shared between people who’ve decided to be together 'til death they do part. When couples sleep together it’s an expression of their closeness and how they care for one another when they are most vulnerable.

However, for some couples, the marital bed can be a warzone. Throughout the night couples can endure snoring, sleep apnea, the ongoing battle for sheets or circadian rhythms that never seem to sync. If one person likes to fall asleep with the TV on while the other reads a book, it can be impossible to come to an agreement on a good-night routine.

Last week on TODAY, host Carson Daly reminded viewers that he and his wife Siri, a TODAY Food contributor, had a sleep divorce while she was pregnant with their fourth child.

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Teacher of the year explains why he's leaving district in unforgettable 3-minute speech

"I'm leaving in hopes that I can regain the ability to do the job that I love."

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