A nun is going viral for her mad chainsaw skills during hurricane cleanup in Florida.

There's a dark-clothed, chainsaw-wielding person roaming the streets of Miami in the wake of Hurricane Irma.

Southern Florida has been through a lot; Millions of residents are still without power, facing severely damaged homes and a critical lack of supplies.

So, yeah. This is the last thing they need:


GIF via "The Texas Chainsaw Massacre."

But the SoFlo chainsaw artist is no villain. She's a nun. And she's a hero.

Sister Margaret Ann, who people are calling "The Chainsaw Nun," has been using her tool of choice to cut up and remove trees felled by the storm.

A video posted to the Miami-Dade Police Department's Facebook page showing her in action during critical storm cleanup has gone viral, racking up over a million views:

Posted by Miami-Dade Police Department on Tuesday, September 12, 2017

As a principal at a local Miami high school, Sister Margaret Ann knew she needed to help however she could after her neighborhood was ravaged by storm winds and heavy rain. She never expected it would turn her into a viral hero.

"The road was blocked; we couldn't get through," she told CNN. "And I saw somebody spin in the mud and almost go into a wall, going off the road. So, there was a need, I had the means — so I wanted to help out."

With nearly the entire country sending "thoughts and prayers" toward those affected by the recent hurricanes, one Facebook commenter made a poignant observation:

"Prayers are great, but prayer accompanied by action is powerful," wrote Kevin Reed.

While the bizarre contrast of a nun in full habit holding a heavy duty power tool might make us smile, what's going on as Florida recovers from the storm is no laughing matter. Sister Margaret Ann and her chainsaw are an excellent reminder to all of us that we have the power to get involved and help the people who need it right now.

The Chainsaw Nun is amazing, but she can't do it all on her own. If you want to pitch in but don't live near the areas affected by Irma (or just don't have a chainsaw lying around), there are still plenty of ways you can help.

True

If the past year has taught us nothing else, it's that sending love out into the world through selfless acts of kindness can have a positive ripple effect on people and communities. People all over the United States seemed to have gotten the message — 71% of those surveyed by the World Giving Index helped a stranger in need in 2020. A nonprofit survey found 90% helped others by running errands, calling, texting and sending care packages. Many people needed a boost last year in one way or another and obliging good neighbors heeded the call over and over again — and continue to make a positive impact through their actions in this new year.

Upworthy and P&G Good Everyday wanted to help keep kindness going strong, so they partnered up to create the Lead with Love Fund. The fund awards do-gooders in communities around the country with grants to help them continue on with their unique missions. Hundreds of nominations came pouring in and five winners were selected based on three criteria: the impact of action, uniqueness, and "Upworthy-ness" of their story.

Here's a look at the five winners:

Edith Ornelas, co-creator of Mariposas Collective in Memphis, Tenn.

Edith Ornelas has a deep-rooted connection to the asylum-seeking immigrant families she brings food and supplies to families in Memphis, Tenn. She was born in Jalisco, Mexico, and immigrated to the United States when she was 7 years old with her parents and sister. Edith grew up in Chicago, then moved to Memphis in 2016, where she quickly realized how few community programs existed for immigrants. Two years later, she helped create Mariposas Collective, which initially aimed to help families who had just been released from detention centers and were seeking asylum. The collective started out small but has since grown to approximately 400 volunteers.