26 ways to help the Hurricane Harvey disaster relief efforts.

Want to help but don't know where to start?

As large swaths of Texas reel from Hurricane Harvey, people around the country are looking for ways to help with what will undoubtedly be a long and expensive recovery process.

If you're someone who wants to help but don't know what organization to support beyond the Red Cross, we've compiled a list of other organizations that will also need support in the coming weeks and months.

More than anything, many of these groups need financial help, but some are also accepting supplies from local donors.

A Rockport, Texas, firefighter goes door-to-door looking for people in need of help after Hurricane Harvey. Photo by Joe Raedle/Getty Images.


Here are 26 organizations that need support in the wake of Hurricane Harvey:  

1. Global Giving is trying to raise $2 million for Hurricane Harvey relief.

In addition to providing emergency supplies such as food, water, and medicine, it will also help support the rebuilding and recovery period to follow.

2. Convoy of Hope made the trip down to Texas with truckloads of food and medical supplies in tow.

3. Americares is working to get medical supplies to evacuees and first responders.

4. Direct Relief has made its medical inventory available to help in the wake of Harvey.

The group is sending Hurricane Preparedness Packs to people on the ground in Texas and has committed $200,000 to local response efforts.

5. The South Texas Blood and Tissue Center is taking online financial donations as well as in-person blood donations.

6. Heart to Heart International is on the ground delivering medical supplies to evacuees and responders.

7. The Homeless Period Project of Austin is delivering tampons, pads, and other period-related products to people displaced by the storm.

8. Nearby Airbnb hosts can help out by listing their places for free.

The company is waiving all administrative costs while still providing the Host Guarantee insurance coverage.

9. The George R. Brown Convention Center in Houston has opened its doors to those in need of shelter.

They're in need of supplies such as baby formula, diapers, hand sanitizer, nonperishable food, sweatsuits, socks, towels, bottles of water, soap, shampoo, toothpaste, blankets, and pillows. More information can be found on the George R. Brown website.

10. The Texas Diaper Bank is providing baby supplies to families in need.

To ensure our staff is safe through the storm, we will be reopening on Monday morning at 8am to collect diapers and any...

Posted by Texas Diaper Bank on Friday, August 25, 2017

11. Local Humane Society locations are doing what they can to help lost or abandoned pets.

We want to update everyone on conditions at HHS today. We are fortunate our buildings are not under water. The far...

Posted by Houston Humane Society on Sunday, August 27, 2017

12. Austin Pets Alive has taken in more than 200 animals since the storm hit.

The group's website lists a number of ways to help out financially, by volunteering, or by fostering pets.

13. The SPCA of Texas is taking in pets from animal shelters that have been hit by the storm.

14. Portlight is assisting people with disabilities during the storm and its aftermath.

Your generous contributions to Portlight are making this possible:We are now working with the Cajun Navy...a wonderful...

Posted by Paul Timmons on Monday, August 28, 2017

15. Local food banks will be essential in the coming weeks.

Houston Press put together a list of food banks serving areas affected by the storm. Contact those locations individually or visit the Feeding Texas website for more information on how to help.

16. Covenant House is providing shelter to homeless youth, currently caring for 79 children in Houston.

17. Save the Children set up a Harvey Children's Relief Fund to get aid to kids and families in need.

18. Team Rubicon is deploying veterans and first responders to areas affected by the storm.

19. Immigrant and refugee nonprofit RAICES is providing support for undocumented immigrants who were abandoned by ICE before the storm hit.

This is what keeping communities safe looks like to #ICE: abandoning 50 asylum seeking mothers and children at a bus station in San Antonio before a hurricane. #DefundHate #HurricaneHarvey

Posted by RAICES on Saturday, August 26, 2017

20. Similarly, Catholic Charities is providing support to undocumented immigrants in the storm's path.

21. The Transgender Foundation of America launched a relief fund to help Houston-area trans and intersex individuals during and after the storm.

Trans individuals have a history of being turned away from shelters during disasters, making the relief fund necessary for survival.

22. Lions Clubs International issued a $100,000 grant to its local chapters to buy blankets, food, and other supplies.

23. The United Way of Greater Houston allows people to target their donation by county (or just send it wherever it's needed most).

To help those affected by the storm outside the Houston area, the United Way also has a list of additional recovery funds.

24. The United Methodist Committee on Relief is providing shelter and support along evacuation routes.

25. The Houston chapter of the Democratic Socialists of America is trying to raise $50,000 for food, water, and tarps.

26. GoFundMe created a hub of its Harvey-specific campaigns for easy access.

A wide range of causes are covered on that page, from individuals trying to raise money for home repairs to getting hot meals to evacuees.

Note: As is always the case with charities, it's a good idea to do a quick search on Charity Navigator before making a donation to any organization.

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