A new report shows that women's biggest murder risk is having loved ones. That's unreal.

More than half of women who are murdered are killed by intimate partners or family members.

A new report from the United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime reveals that of the 87,000 women murdered around the world in 2017, around 50,000 were killed by a loved one—an intimate partner or a close family member. More than half of those 50,000 were murdered by their partner.

Put another way, a woman is killed by someone who is supposed to love them every 10 minutes. In contrast, most men who are murdered are killed by strangers or acquaintances.


According to the report, "gender-related killings of women and girls remain a grave problem across regions ,in countries rich and poor. While the vast majority of homicide victims are men, killed by strangers, women are far more likely to die at the hands of someone they know. Women killed by intimate partners or family members account for 58 per cent of all female homicide victims reported globally last year, and little progress has been made in preventing such murders."

Adding to those disturbing stats, pregnant women are more likely to die by homicide than by pregnancy complications.

One might think that a pregnant woman would be less likely to be murdered than a non-pregnant woman, simply because there ought to be some basic standards of human decency. But pregnant women are actually twice as likely to be killed as non-pregnant women.

Research has shown homicide to be the leading cause of death for pregnant women. We hear a lot about maternal mortality rates, but most of us aren't aware that one out of five women who die during pregnancy or during the postpartum period die because they've been murdered. In fact, more pregnant women are shot, strangled, beaten to death, or otherwise killed at the hands of another human than die from pregnancy complications.

Let that sink in for a minute.

Men and women kill their partners and are killed by their partners for drastically different reasons.

It's worth pointing out that while most men who murder people kill strangers, and most men who are murdered are killed by strangers, the opposite is true for women on both fronts. Women are more likely to be killed by a loved one than by a stranger, but are also more likely to kill a loved one than murder a stranger.

For women, the first stat leads to the second. According to the UN report, "male and female perpetrators of intimate partner homicide seem to belong to distinct groups, not only in terms of prevalence rates, but also in terms of the motivations behind the offence: motivations typically reported by men include possessiveness, jealousy and fear of abandonment, while motivations reported by women relate to extended periods of suffering physical violence."

In other words, men tend to kill their partners because they view them as possessions to be controlled. Women tend to kill their partners because they can't put up with their partner's abuse anymore.

The UN report points out that domestic violence killings don't happen out of the blue. There are warning signs.

While those statistics paint a grim picture for women, the report also shows that we can do more to recognize the warning signs that a woman is in danger.

"Research shows that the killing of women and girls by intimate partners does not result from random or spontaneous acts," says the researchers. "It is therefore useful to identify and analyse the factors that precede such killings, along with the traits and characteristics of the perpetrators, among whom considerable gender differences exist."

Naturally, none of this information means that men are awful and women are saints, so if your first reaction is #notallmen, have a seat. It simply means that gender-based violence is a real issue and all of us need to educate ourselves about it. We need to learn to recognize the warning signs of domestic violence and support programs and legislation designed to mitigate. For example, we can support making the Violence Against Women Act, which will expire December 7 unless it's renewed by Congress, a permanent piece of legislation.

We live in a backwards world when women have more to fear from their loved ones than from strangers. It's up to all of us to set that world aright.

Courtesy of Verizon
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If someone were to say "video games" to you, what are the first words that come to mind? Whatever words you thought of (fun, exciting, etc.), we're willing to guess "healthy" or "mental health tool" didn't pop into your mind.

And yet… it turns out they are. Especially for Veterans.

How? Well, for one thing, video games — and virtual reality more generally — are also more accessible and less stigmatized to veterans than mental health treatment. In fact, some psychiatrists are using virtual reality systems for this reason to treat PTSD.

Secondly, video games allow people to socialize in new ways with people who share common interests and goals. And for Veterans, many of whom leave the military feeling isolated or lonely after they lose the daily camaraderie of their regiment, that socialization is critical to their mental health. It gives them a virtual group of friends to talk with, connect to, and relate to through shared goals and interests.

In addition, according to a 2018 study, since many video games simulate real-life situations they encountered during their service, it makes socialization easier since they can relate to and find common ground with other gamers while playing.

This can help ease symptoms of depression, anxiety, and even PTSD in Veterans, which affects 20% of the Veterans who have served since 9/11.

Watch here as Verizon dives into the stories of three Veteran gamers to learn how video games helped them build community, deal with trauma and have some fun.

Band of Gamers www.youtube.com

Video games have been especially beneficial to Veterans since the beginning of the pandemic when all of us — Veterans included — have been even more isolated than ever before.

And that's why Verizon launched a challenge last year, which saw $30,000 donated to four military charities.

And this year, they're going even bigger by launching a new World of Warships charity tournament in partnership with Wargaming and Wounded Warrior Project called "Verizon Warrior Series." During the tournament, gamers will be able to interact with the game's iconic ships in new and exciting ways, all while giving back.

Together with these nonprofits, the tournament will welcome teams all across the nation in order to raise money for military charities helping Veterans in need. There will be a $100,000 prize pool donated to these charities, as well as donation drives for injured Veterans at every match during the tournament to raise extra funds.

Verizon is also providing special discounts to Those Who Serve communities, including military and first responders, and they're offering a $75 in-game content military promo for World of Warships.

Tournament finals are scheduled for August 8, so be sure to tune in to the tournament and donate if you can in order to give back to Veterans in need.

Courtesy of Verizon

via CNN / Twitter

Eviction seemed imminent for Dasha Kelly, 32, and her three young daughters Sharron, 8; Kia, 6; and Imani, 5, on Monday. The eviction moratorium expired over the weekend and it looked like there was no way for them to avoid becoming homeless.

The former Las Vegas card dealer lost her job due to casino closures during the pandemic and needed $2,000 to cover her back rent. The mother of three couldn't bear the thought of being put out of her apartment with three children in the scorching Nevada desert.

"I had no idea what we were going to do," Kelly said, according to KOAT.

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