Last August, a riot broke out in Chemnitz, Germany after over 7,000 people from far-right groups took to the streets to protest the death of a Cuban-German man killed by two Kurdish immigrants.

During the riot, right-wing protestors chased down immigrants while making Nazi salutes and at least 20 people were injured.

“They created this atmosphere of fear among the citizens there,” Philipp Ruch, the artistic director, of Center for Political Beauty, told The Daily Beast. “They menaced foreigners, and also the press… They hunted people. The whole country was in shock.”


The Center for Political Beauty, abbreviated as ZBS in German, is a left-wing art collective and artist hub. In the past, it has organized public awareness campaigns such as building a Holocaust memorial on a right-wing leader’s home and coordinating funerals for migrants who died on the way to Germany.

In the riot’s aftermath, ZPS got to work identifying nearly 1,500 of the right-wing protesters. But the art collective wanted more, so they set up a scheme to find more neo-Nazis and far right-wing groups behind the riots.

via Umbra 101/Flickr

ZPS set up a website featuring photos of 1,500 protesters it had identified. Many of the protesters, for fear they had been identified, logged on to see if their photos were on the site. But the website only showed 20 pictures per web page. So, to save time, site visitors entered their names or people they knew who were at the protest in a search bar.

ZPS collected all of the names entered in the search and were able to identify at least 25 rioters it hadn't previously. “What we got was quite a network of who knows who, and who else was in Chemnitz,” Ruch said.

If there’s one thing we can count on it is Nazis acting dumb. ZBS knew that and let them play right into their hands.

Photo by CDC on Unsplash

When schools closed early in the spring, the entire country was thrown for a loop. Parents had to figure out what to do with their kids. Teachers had to figure out how to teach students at home. Kids had to figure out how to navigate a totally new routine that was being created and altered in real time.

For many families, it was a big honking mess—one that many really don't want to repeat in the fall.

But at the same time, the U.S. hasn't gotten a handle on the coronavirus pandemic. As states have begun reopening—several of them too early, according to public health officials—COVID-19 cases have risen to the point where we now have more cases per day than we did during the height of the outbreak in the spring. And yet President Trump is making a huge push to get schools to reopen fully in the fall, even threatening to possibly remove funding if they don't.

It's worth pointing out that Denmark and Norway had 10 and 11 new cases yesterday. Sweden and Germany had around 300 each. The U.S. had 55,000. (And no, that's not because we're testing thousands of times more people than those countries are.)

The president of the country's largest teacher's union had something to say about Trump's push to reopen schools. Lily Eskelsen Garcia says that schools do need to reopen, but they need to be able to reopen safely—with measures that will help keep both students and teachers from spreading the virus and making the pandemic worse. (Trump has also criticized the CDCs "very tough & expensive guidelines" for reopening schools.)

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