39 of the best celebrity responses to Keaton Jones' powerful video about bullying.

People of different backgrounds came together in support of one courageous boy.

Last week, a Tennessee woman named Kimberly Jones posted a video of her son Keaton online. It went mega-viral.

The video, which has been viewed on Facebook more than 20 million times since posting, shows Keaton in tears over being bullied at school. There's a sense of despair and helplessness in his voice that no child should have to feel, but too many have.

"Just out of curiosity, why do they bully?" a distraught Keaton asks his mom. "What's the point of it? Why do they find joy in taking innocent people and finding a way to be mean to them?"


The video clearly resonated with people — some who have been bullied, some who have been the bully — and within hours, words of support began to roll in from around the world, including some notes from some high profile people.

Hollywood has Keaton's back.

Avengers Chris Evans and Mark Ruffalo came up big for the little guy.

As did Eleven from "Stranger Things," offering her friendship.

The delightful Tom Cavanagh of "The Flash" voiced his support  for Jones and against bullies everywhere.

Same with Beth Behrs of "Two Broke Girls."

He got some love from members of "The Walking Dead" cast.

Even Gaston and LeFou (a couple of fiction's most famous bullies) weren't having it.

Broadway star Ben Platt offered a few words of support.

And so did voice actors Susan Eisenberg and Kevin Conroy, who provided the voices for Wonder Woman and Batman, respectively, on the animated "Justice League" TV show.

"Coco" director Lee Unkrich and "Ghostbusters" mastermind Paul Feig stepped up.

Some of the biggest stars in professional sports showed up, as well.

LeBron James called bullies "straight up wack, corny, cowards, chumps."

Cubs slugger Anthony Rizzo and Pirates outfielder Andrew McCutchen both offered words of kindness and comfort.

Former Green Bay Packers cornerback Bernard Blake urged Jones to "never be ashamed of who you are." Former NFL star Antonio Cromartie stepped in to say that bullies are often just insecure about themselves, asking him to be strong.

Former NFL wide receiver Donté Stallworth urged caution for people suggesting that the bullies be confronted with hostility, asking people who really want to make a difference to try to do it through lessons of love.

"Bullying is bullshit," summed up World Cup champion Ali Krieger. "We need to start coming together, supporting each other and most importantly, standing up for beautiful kids in this world like Keaton."

Similarly, the music world had words of encouragement and support for Jones.

Demi Lovato predicted that Jones would come out of this experience much stronger than he entered it. Enrique Iglesias called the video "heartbreaking."

"This extremely raw and real moment has brought hope and truth to so many people," wrote Kevin Jonas. Nickelback called Jones "a brave young man," asking if there was anything the band could do for them.

Justin Bieber and Snoop Dogg posted words of support on Instagram. "The fact that he still has the sympathy and compassion for other people when he's going through it himself is a testament to who he is," said Bieber.

A post shared by Justin Bieber (@justinbieber) on

Anti-bullying activists, models, and YouTube sensations all got in on the act as well.

Monica Lewinsky offered a few kind words, saying that she's sorry Jones is being treated this way, saying that other kids "would be lucky to be friends with [Jones]."

Model Mia Kang said Jones is her "absolute hero," offering to fly out and visit him at school for lunch.

Logan Paul offered to chat with Jones on FaceTime and send some gear his way.

Politicians across the political spectrum offered words of kindness and courage.

Senator Bob Corker (R-Tennessee) thanked the young man for his courage, and Representative Joe Kennedy III (D-Massachusetts) asked others to look to Jones as a positive example.

Responding to an offer from UFC head Dana White to visit the organization's headquarters, Donald Trump Jr. offered the Jones family a place to stay. Jane O'Meara Sanders of the Sanders Institute urged action over platitudes, calling on the country to "stand up to bullies — in our schools and communities, on social media and in politics and the White House."

Media personalities joined the chorus with offers of support and workplace tours.

Jemele Hill and Sean Hannity offered Jones and his family tours of ESPN and Fox News, respectively. NBC's Stephanie Ruhle pointed to Jones as a motivation for a more honest, brave, and kind world.

HLN's S.E. Cupp shared a story about being bullied as a child, saying, "It's got nothing to do with you and everything to do with them." Sunny Hostin, from "The View," ended with a reminder that "being different makes you special."

It's wonderful to see so many people, from so many backgrounds, come together in support of this one boy.

It's worth remembering, however, that he's not the only child in the world being bullied.

According to StopBullying.gov, 28% of U.S. students in grades 6 through12 have experienced bullying. 30% of students have admitted to being a bully to others. School bullying creates a hostile environment not conducive to learning and puts students' physical, emotional, and mental health at risk.

If Keaton Jones' story inspired you to take action, check out the StopBullying prevention toolkits for students, parents, teachers, and community members.

More
via bfmamatalk / facebook

Where did we go wrong as a society to make women feel uncomfortable about breastfeeding in public?

No one should feel they have the right to tell a woman when, where, and how she can breastfeed. The stigma should be placed on those who have the nerve to tell a woman feeding her child to "Cover up" or to ask "Where's your modesty?"

Breasts were made to feed babies. Yes, they also have a sexual function but anyone who has the maturity of a sixth grader knows the difference between a sexual act and feeding a child.

Keep Reading Show less
popular
Instagram / JLo

The Me Too movement has shed light on just how many actresses have been placed in positions that make them feel uncomfortable. Abuse of power has been all too commonplace. Some actresses have been coerced into doing something that made them uncomfortable because they felt they couldn't say no to the director. And it's not always as flagrant as Louis C.K. masturbating in front of an up-and-coming comedian, or Harvey Weinstein forcing himself on actresses in hotel rooms.

But it's important to remember that you can always firmly put your foot down and say no. While speaking at The Hollywood Reporter's annual Actress Roundtable, Jennifer Lopez opened up about her experiences with a director who behaved inappropriately. Laura Dern, Awkwafina, Scarlett Johansson, Lupita Nyong'o, and Renee Zellweger were also at the roundtable.

Keep Reading Show less
popular

Life for a shelter dog, even if it's a comfortable shelter administered by the ASPCA with as many amenities as can be afforded, is still not the same as having the comfort and safety of a forever home. Professional violinist Martin Agee knows that and that's why he volunteers himself and his instrument to help.

Keep Reading Show less
popular
Courtesy of Macy's

In many ways, 18-year-old Idaho native, Hank Cazier, is like any other teenager you've met. He loves chocolate, pop music, and playing games with his family. He has lofty dreams of modeling for a major clothing company one day. But one thing that sets him apart may also jeopardize his future is his recent battle against a brain tumor.

Cazier was diagnosed in 2015. When he had surgery to remove the tumor, he received trauma to his brain and lost some of his motor functionality. He's been in physical, occupational, and speech therapy ever since. The experience impacted Cazier's confidence and self-esteem, so he's been looking for a way to build himself back up again.

"I wanted to do something that helped me look forward to the future," he says.

Enter Make-A-Wish, a nonprofit organization that grants wishes for children battling critical illnesses, providing them a chance to make the impossible possible. The organization partnered with Macy's to raise awareness and help make those wishes a reality. The hope is that the "wish effect" will improve their quality of life and empower them with the strength they need to overcome these illnesses and look towards the future. That was a particularly big deal for Cazier, who had been feeling like so many of his wishes weren't going to be possible because of his critical illness.

"In the beginning, it was hard to accept that it would be improbable for me to accomplish my previous goals because my illness took away so many of my physical abilities," says Cazier. His wish of becoming a model also seemed out of reach.

But Macy's and Make-A-Wish didn't see it like that. Once they learned about Cazier's wish, they knew he had to make it come true by inviting him to be part of the magical Macy's holiday shoot in New York.

Courtesy of Macy's

Make-A-Wish can't fulfill children's wishes without the generosity of donors and partners like Macy's. In fact, since 2003, Macy's has given more than $122 million to Make-A-Wish and impacted the lives of more than 2.9 million people.

Cazier's wish experience was beyond what he could've imagined, and it filled him with so much joy and confidence. "It is like waking up and discovering that you have super powers. It feels amazing!" he exclaims.

One of the best parts about the day for him was the kindness everyone who helped make it happen showed him.

"The employees of Macy's and Make-A-Wish made me feel welcome, warm, and cared for," he says. "I am truly grateful that even though they were busy doing their jobs, they were able to show kindness and compassion towards me in all of the little details."

He also got to spend part of the shoot outdoors, which, as someone who loves climbing, hiking, and scuba-diving but has trouble doing those activities now, was very welcome.

Courtesy of Macy's

Overall, Cazier feels he grew a lot during his modeling wish and is now emboldened to work towards a better quality of life. "I want to acquire skills that help me continue to improve in these circumstances," he says.

You can change the lives of more kids like Cazier just by writing a letter to Santa and dropping it in the big red letterbox at Macy's (you can also write and submit one online). For every letter received before Dec. 24, 2019, Macy's will donate $1 to Make-A-Wish, up to $1 million. By writing a letter to Santa, you can help a child replace fear with confidence, sadness with joy, and anxiety with hope.

Believe
True
Macy's