39 of the best celebrity responses to Keaton Jones' powerful video about bullying.

People of different backgrounds came together in support of one courageous boy.

Last week, a Tennessee woman named Kimberly Jones posted a video of her son Keaton online. It went mega-viral.

The video, which has been viewed on Facebook more than 20 million times since posting, shows Keaton in tears over being bullied at school. There's a sense of despair and helplessness in his voice that no child should have to feel, but too many have.

"Just out of curiosity, why do they bully?" a distraught Keaton asks his mom. "What's the point of it? Why do they find joy in taking innocent people and finding a way to be mean to them?"


The video clearly resonated with people — some who have been bullied, some who have been the bully — and within hours, words of support began to roll in from around the world, including some notes from some high profile people.

Hollywood has Keaton's back.

Avengers Chris Evans and Mark Ruffalo came up big for the little guy.

As did Eleven from "Stranger Things," offering her friendship.

The delightful Tom Cavanagh of "The Flash" voiced his support  for Jones and against bullies everywhere.

Same with Beth Behrs of "Two Broke Girls."

He got some love from members of "The Walking Dead" cast.

Even Gaston and LeFou (a couple of fiction's most famous bullies) weren't having it.

Broadway star Ben Platt offered a few words of support.

And so did voice actors Susan Eisenberg and Kevin Conroy, who provided the voices for Wonder Woman and Batman, respectively, on the animated "Justice League" TV show.

"Coco" director Lee Unkrich and "Ghostbusters" mastermind Paul Feig stepped up.

Some of the biggest stars in professional sports showed up, as well.

LeBron James called bullies "straight up wack, corny, cowards, chumps."

Cubs slugger Anthony Rizzo and Pirates outfielder Andrew McCutchen both offered words of kindness and comfort.

Former Green Bay Packers cornerback Bernard Blake urged Jones to "never be ashamed of who you are." Former NFL star Antonio Cromartie stepped in to say that bullies are often just insecure about themselves, asking him to be strong.

Former NFL wide receiver Donté Stallworth urged caution for people suggesting that the bullies be confronted with hostility, asking people who really want to make a difference to try to do it through lessons of love.

"Bullying is bullshit," summed up World Cup champion Ali Krieger. "We need to start coming together, supporting each other and most importantly, standing up for beautiful kids in this world like Keaton."

Similarly, the music world had words of encouragement and support for Jones.

Demi Lovato predicted that Jones would come out of this experience much stronger than he entered it. Enrique Iglesias called the video "heartbreaking."

"This extremely raw and real moment has brought hope and truth to so many people," wrote Kevin Jonas. Nickelback called Jones "a brave young man," asking if there was anything the band could do for them.

Justin Bieber and Snoop Dogg posted words of support on Instagram. "The fact that he still has the sympathy and compassion for other people when he's going through it himself is a testament to who he is," said Bieber.

A post shared by Justin Bieber (@justinbieber) on

Anti-bullying activists, models, and YouTube sensations all got in on the act as well.

Monica Lewinsky offered a few kind words, saying that she's sorry Jones is being treated this way, saying that other kids "would be lucky to be friends with [Jones]."

Model Mia Kang said Jones is her "absolute hero," offering to fly out and visit him at school for lunch.

Logan Paul offered to chat with Jones on FaceTime and send some gear his way.

Politicians across the political spectrum offered words of kindness and courage.

Senator Bob Corker (R-Tennessee) thanked the young man for his courage, and Representative Joe Kennedy III (D-Massachusetts) asked others to look to Jones as a positive example.

Responding to an offer from UFC head Dana White to visit the organization's headquarters, Donald Trump Jr. offered the Jones family a place to stay. Jane O'Meara Sanders of the Sanders Institute urged action over platitudes, calling on the country to "stand up to bullies — in our schools and communities, on social media and in politics and the White House."

Media personalities joined the chorus with offers of support and workplace tours.

Jemele Hill and Sean Hannity offered Jones and his family tours of ESPN and Fox News, respectively. NBC's Stephanie Ruhle pointed to Jones as a motivation for a more honest, brave, and kind world.

HLN's S.E. Cupp shared a story about being bullied as a child, saying, "It's got nothing to do with you and everything to do with them." Sunny Hostin, from "The View," ended with a reminder that "being different makes you special."

It's wonderful to see so many people, from so many backgrounds, come together in support of this one boy.

It's worth remembering, however, that he's not the only child in the world being bullied.

According to StopBullying.gov, 28% of U.S. students in grades 6 through12 have experienced bullying. 30% of students have admitted to being a bully to others. School bullying creates a hostile environment not conducive to learning and puts students' physical, emotional, and mental health at risk.

If Keaton Jones' story inspired you to take action, check out the StopBullying prevention toolkits for students, parents, teachers, and community members.

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On an old episode of "The Oprah Winfrey Show" in July 1992, Oprah put her audience through a social experiment that puts racism in a new light. Despite being nearly two decades old, it's as relevant today as ever.

She split the audience members into two groups based on their eye color. Those with brown eyes were given preferential treatment by getting to cut the line and given refreshments while they waited to be seated. Those with blue eyes were made to put on a green collar and wait in a crowd for two hours.

Staff were instructed to be extra polite to brown-eyed people and to discriminate against blue-eyed people. Her guest for that day's show was diversity expert Jane Elliott, who helped set up the experiment and played along, explaining that brown-eyed people were smarter than blue-eyed people.

Watch the video to see how this experiment plays out.

Oprah's Social Experiment on Her Audience www.youtube.com

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Cadbury has removed the words from its Dairy Milk chocolate bars in the U.K. to draw attention to a serious issue, senior loneliness.

On September 4, Cadbury released the limited-edition candy bars in supermarkets and for every one sold, the candy giant will donate 30p (37 cents) to Age UK, an organization dedicated to improving the quality of life for the elderly.

Cadbury was prompted to help the organization after it was revealed that 225,000 elderly people in the UK often go an entire week without speaking to another person.

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Young people today are facing what seems to be greater exposure to complex issues like mental health, bullying, and youth violence. As a result, teachers are required to be well-versed in far more than school curriculum to ensure students are prepared to face the world inside and outside of the classroom. Acting as more than teachers, but also mentors, counselors, and cheerleaders, they must be equipped with practical and relevant resources to help their students navigate some of the more complicated social issues – though access to such tools isn't always guaranteed.

Take Dr. Jackie Sanderlin, for example, who's worked in the education system for over 25 years, and as a teacher for seven. Entering the profession, she didn't anticipate how much influence a student's home life could affect her classroom, including "students who lived in foster homes" and "lacked parental support."

Dr. Jackie Sanderlin, who's worked in the education system for over 25 years.

Valerie Anglemyer, a middle school teacher with more than 13 years of experience, says it can be difficult to create engaging course work that's applicable to the challenges students face. "I think that sometimes, teachers don't know where to begin. Teachers are always looking for ways to make learning in their classrooms more relevant."

So what resources do teachers turn to in an increasingly fractured world? "Joining a professional learning network that supports and challenges thinking is one of the most impactful things that a teacher can do to support their own learning," Anglemyer says.

Valerie Anglemyer, a middle school teacher with more than 13 years of experience.

A new program for teachers that offers this network along with other resources is the WE Teachers Program, an initiative developed by Walgreens in partnership with ME to WE and Mental Health America. WE Teachers provides tools and resources, at no cost to teachers, looking for guidance around the social issues related to poverty, youth violence, mental health, bullying, and diversity and inclusion. Through online modules and trainings as well as a digital community, these resources help them address the critical issues their students face.

Jessica Mauritzen, a high school Spanish teacher, credits a network of support for providing her with new opportunities to enrich the learning experience for her students. "This past year was a year of awakening for me and through support… I realized that I was able to teach in a way that built up our community, our school, and our students, and supported them to become young leaders," she says.

With the new WE Teachers program, teachers can learn to identify the tough issues affecting their students, secure the tools needed to address them in a supportive manner, and help students become more socially-conscious, compassionate, and engaged citizens.

It's a potentially life-saving experience for students, and in turn, "a great gift for teachers," says Dr. Sanderlin.

"I wish I had the WE Teachers program when I was a teacher because it provides the online training and resources teachers need to begin to grapple with these critical social issues that plague our students every day," she adds.

In addition to the WE Teachers curriculum, the program features a WE Teachers Award to honor educators who go above and beyond in their classrooms. At least 500 teachers will be recognized and each will receive a $500 Walgreens gift card, which is the average amount teachers spend out-of-pocket on supplies annually. Teachers can be nominated or apply themselves. To learn more about the awards and how to nominate an amazing teacher, or sign up for access to the teacher resources available through WE Teachers, visit walgreens.com/metowe.

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One of the major differences between women and men is that women are often judged based on their looks rather than their character or abilities.

"Men as well as women tend to establish the worth of individual women primarily by the way their body looks, research shows. We do not do this when we evaluate men," Naomi Ellemers Ph.D. wrote in Psychology Today.

Dr. Ellers believes that this tendency to judge a woman solely on her looks causes them to be seen as an object rather than a person.

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