A 3-year-old cancer survivor can't leave his house. Now strangers are showing up to cheer him on.


Front lawn becomes a stage for a house-ridden boy www.youtube.com


What happens when a three-year old cancer survivor, whose immune system is compromised, is told he can't leave the house the summer before he's supposed to start pre-school? Well, a bunch of strangers organize to come to him and make it a summer he'll never forget, and it's heart-warming as all get out.


One day shortly after his second birthday Quinn Waters' older sister Maggie noticed he was walking weird and falling over, and told their mother Tara. After a trip to the hospital and an MRI they were given the bad news – Quinn was diagnosed with Medulloblastoma, a type of large brain tumor.

The stem cell treatment Quinn received left his immune system compromised to such a degree that a simple cold could land him in the hospital and risk his life. That led to isolation in his house, with the only people allowed to make direct contact with him being his immediate family.

That's hard for a little boy who just wants to play outside in the summer sun, "…there would be days when Quinn is literally pounding to get out." Tara Waters said.

Related: A boy was bullied for making his own Tennessee Vol's shirt. Now it's the school's official logo.

So, they created a Facebook page and the world took note. All of a sudden Quinn found that he opened the window and the world, literally, had come to play with him.

He got all kinds of guests. He saw a carnival, a whole carnival! He got a command performance from local Boston band The Dropkick Murphys.

He was even given a special visit from a whole bunch of his favorite super heroes. And you really have to give it up for the guy dressed as Batman, it looks like it's pretty hot in there.

"He's a feisty, rambunctious 3-year-old — full of energy," said Jarlath Waters, 42, who works as a union carpenter. "He's also a fighter, and we knew he wouldn't let this get him down. But what we didn't expect was such a huge outpouring of support."

And one of the finest displays to date was when the Winslow police and fire departments showed up and put on a show for Quinn. After a great time they drove away to get back on patrol and blasted their sirens. "Be safe!" Quinn yelled after them, which if you think about is incredible since he's still worried about others despite his condition. And it had to have warmed his mom's heart since she works as a police officer.

Even the Europeans got in the act, starting a GoFundMe campaign to help raise money for his treatments.

Recently Quinn landed back in the hospital when a blood infection threatened his life, but his indomitable spirit and the help of a local blood drive to help collect for a necessary blood transfusion. Just another way folks are helping the afflicted boy.

Quinn's got a long road ahead of him, but with practically the Earth itself behind him we have high hopes for his recovery. If you'd like to learn more about how you might be able to help Quinn and his family visit some of the links provided in this article for more information.

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When a pet is admitted to a shelter it can be a traumatizing experience. Many are afraid of their new surroundings and are far from comfortable showing off their unique personalities. The problem is that's when many of them have their photos taken to appear in online searches.

Chewy, the pet retailer who has dedicated themselves to supporting shelters and rescues throughout the country, recognized the important work of a couple in Tampa, FL who have been taking professional photos of shelter pets to help get them adopted.

"If it's a photo of a scared animal, most people, subconsciously or even consciously, are going to skip over it," pet photographer Adam Goldberg says. "They can't visualize that dog in their home."

Adam realized the importance of quality shelter photos while working as a social media specialist for the Humane Society of Broward County in Fort Lauderdale, Florida.

"The photos were taken top-down so you couldn't see the size of the pet, and the flash would create these red eyes," he recalls. "Sometimes [volunteers] would shoot the photos through the chain-link fences."

That's why Adam and his wife, Mary, have spent much of their free time over the past five years photographing over 1,200 shelter animals to show off their unique personalities to potential adoptive families. The Goldbergs' wonderful work was recently profiled by Chewy in the video above entitled, "A Day in the Life of a Shelter Pet Photographer."

Vanna White appeared on "The Price Is Right" in 1980.

Vanna White has been a household name in the United States for decades, which is kind of hilarious when you consider how she gained her fame and fortune. Since 1982, the former model and actress has made millions walking back and forth turning letters (and later simply touching them—yay technology) on the game show "Wheel of Fortune."

That's it. Walking back and forth in a pretty evening gown, flipping letters and clapping for contestants. More on that job in a minute…

As a member of Gen X, television game shows like "Wheel of Fortune" and "The Price is Right" send me straight back to my childhood. Watching this clip from 1980 of Vanna White competing on "The Price is Right" two years before she started turning letters on "Wheel of Fortune" is like stepping into a time machine. Bob Barker's voice, the theme music, the sound effects—I swear I'm home from school sick, lying on the ugly flowered couch with my mom checking my forehead and bringing me Tang.

This video has it all: the early '80s hairstyles, a fresh-faced Vanna White and Bob Barker's casual sexism that would never in a million years fly today.

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