2 university students discover they have more in common than they thought just by saying 8 words.

History has a funny way of showing the present day what's up.

That's what happened when these girls got together for a little experiment.


Image via Annenberg Media.

One was a native Arabic speaker. The other was a native Spanish speaker. Both girls were students at University of Southern California.

Their classmates, who'd clearly noticed some subtle alliance between the Arabic and Spanish languages, decided to do a little experiment.

So they sat the ladies down and had them say a few Spanish and Arabic words at the same time. The results were ... verrrrry alliance-y:

GIFs via Annenberg Media.

Sounds just about like the exact same word!

Oops, they speak the same language! <3

There was a time in Spanish history where Arabs, Jews, and Christians were co-existing pretty peaceably ... and sharing a lot of culture to boot. Yes!

The southern part of Spain, known as Andalusia, was mostly ruled by Arabic speakers from around 710 to 1492. Christians and Jews lived in towns ruled by Muslim leaders.

While Christians and Jews weren't exactly on the same level as the leaders, they were able to co-exist fairly well. They worked together, studied together, learned together.*

*Except for the women, probably. But that's another story altogether! We're talking about 710 here.

And nowhere was that tenuous alliance and sharing of culture more evident than in the architecture of the time. If you look at the history of Granada, one of the main cities of Muslim Spain, you'll see architectural evidence of cultures mingling. Just look at the buildings: beautiful Muslim palaces on mountainsides, Spanish architecture below.

Picture by ME!

Religions able to exist together in the 700s?! IN SPAIN? Like, Spanish-Inquisition Spain?!

No one expected that, huh?


GIF via "Monty Python."

Least of all these two classmates.

And thanks to this amazing little language experiment, there's more evidence of a golden age of harmony and cultural exchange.

Because Arab folks, or Moors as they were called, lived in Spain for so long, the Arabic language had a huge influence on the pre-existing Spanish.

That's why there's so much shared culture, hidden inside words like "sugar," "music," and "PANTS"!

I love how harmony is hiding underneath the surface of something as basic and fundamental as language.

Harmony and commonality is all around us. We just have to let it in!

Hear the commonality for yourself here:

Photo by Louis Hansel on Unsplash
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This story was originally shared on Capital One.

Inside the walls of her kitchen at her childhood home in Guatemala, Evelyn Klohr, the founder of a Washington, D.C.-area bakery called Kakeshionista, was taught a lesson that remains central to her business operations today.

"Baking cakes gave me the confidence to believe in my own brand and now I put my heart into giving my customers something they'll enjoy eating," Klohr said.

While driven to launch her own baking business, pursuing a dream in the culinary arts was economically challenging for Klohr. In the United States, culinary schools can open doors to future careers, but the cost of entry can be upwards of $36,000 a year.

Through a friend, Klohr learned about La Cocina VA, a nonprofit dedicated to providing job training and entrepreneurship development services at a training facility in the Washington, D.C-area.

La Cocina VA's, which translates to "the kitchen" in Spanish, offers its Bilingual Culinary Training program to prepare low-and moderate-income individuals from diverse backgrounds to launch careers in the food industry.

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via Gage Skidmore/Flickr and Terry Morgan/Flickr

Senator Ted Cruz and a kangaroo.

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Fox News' Tucker Carlson ran a story on Australia earlier this month claiming the country "looks a lot like China did at the beginning of the pandemic." He ended it by saying that "what's happening in Australia might be instructive to us in the United States" and that things can "change very quickly" and become "dystopian and autocratic."

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When a pet is admitted to a shelter it can be a traumatizing experience. Many are afraid of their new surroundings and are far from comfortable showing off their unique personalities. The problem is that's when many of them have their photos taken to appear in online searches.

Chewy, the pet retailer who has dedicated themselves to supporting shelters and rescues throughout the country, recognized the important work of a couple in Tampa, FL who have been taking professional photos of shelter pets to help get them adopted.

"If it's a photo of a scared animal, most people, subconsciously or even consciously, are going to skip over it," pet photographer Adam Goldberg says. "They can't visualize that dog in their home."

Adam realized the importance of quality shelter photos while working as a social media specialist for the Humane Society of Broward County in Fort Lauderdale, Florida.

"The photos were taken top-down so you couldn't see the size of the pet, and the flash would create these red eyes," he recalls. "Sometimes [volunteers] would shoot the photos through the chain-link fences."

That's why Adam and his wife, Mary, have spent much of their free time over the past five years photographing over 1,200 shelter animals to show off their unique personalities to potential adoptive families. The Goldbergs' wonderful work was recently profiled by Chewy in the video above entitled, "A Day in the Life of a Shelter Pet Photographer."