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Zoe Saldana and her husband are making us reconsider last-name traditions. Here's why that's great.

Zoe and Marco Saldana made news by defying one major social norm. Here's why that's a huge deal.

Zoe Saldana and her husband are making us reconsider last-name traditions. Here's why that's great.

When Zoe Saldana and Marco Perego got married in 2013, the couple bucked tradition when Marco took Zoe's last name.

While there are a lot of women who opt to either keep their last name or use a hyphenated version of it, it's rare to hear about the husband adopting his wife's name.

According to InStyle, Zoe tried to talk Marco out of it, saying, "If you use my name, you're going to be emasculated by your community of artists, by your Latin community of men, by the world."


His response was right on: "Ah Zoe, I don't give a s--t."

Photo by Bryan Bedder/Getty Images for AOL.

Most women do take their husband's last name.

60% of respondents in a 2013 Huffington Post/YouGov poll said women should take their husband's last name. More than half of those polled believed that men shouldn't even be allowed to take their wife's name.

Some couples opt for hyphenated names, but it's typically reserved for wives.

When she married Jay-Z in 2008, Beyoncé legally changed her name from Beyoncé Knowles to Beyoncé Knowles-Carter (there are conflicting reports as to whether Jay-Z adopted the hyphenated name as well).

And, no, there's not a conflict between that and her self-identifying as a "modern-day feminist."

Photo by Buda Mendes/Getty Images.

Some opt to take their husband's last name and make their maiden name into a middle name.

This is what Hillary Clinton did. By birth, she was Hillary Diane Rodham. When she got married in 1975, she changed her name to Hillary Diane Rodham Clinton.

Photo by Adam Berry/Getty Images.

No matter what someone decides to do with their name, it's a deeply personal subject.

In 2013, Women's Health polled Men's Health readers on the question of last names for an article titled "How Men REALLY Feel When You Keep Your Last Name."

The answers ranged from possessive to extremely possessive.

63% of men surveyed said they'd be upset if their wives kept their birth names.

"One family, one name," one of the men responded. "If she didn't take my name, I'd seriously question her faith in us lasting as a couple."

“It sounds like she's trying to hang onto her 'single person' identity and not identify with the fact that she's married now," wrote another.

96% of men surveyed said they wouldn't consider taking their wives' last name, even if asked.

"My name is part of who I am," a man wrote, demonstrating the disconnect between the idea that men are entitled to their names while their wives are not.

"It's not happening," said another.

Photo by Jason Kempin/Getty Images.

Of course, it's perfectly acceptable for a woman to change her name should she want to, or to take her maiden name as a middle name. Lots of women do, and their reasons for doing so are their own.

But when you consider why women are expected to give up their names while men are not, it's a little surprising that more couples aren't choosing to do what Zoe and Marco Saldana have done.

By speaking about their decision, the Saldanas are helping establish a precedent and dismantling some of the gendered aspects of traditional marriage ... and that's a good thing.

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After years of service as a military nurse in the naval Marine Corps, Los Angeles, California-resident Rhonda Jackson became one of the 37,000 retired veterans in the U.S. who are currently experiencing homelessness — roughly eight percent of the entire homeless population.

"I was living in a one-bedroom apartment with no heat for two years," Jackson said. "The Department of Veterans Affairs was doing everything they could to help but I was not in a good situation."

One day in 2019, Jackson felt a sudden sense of hope for a better living arrangement when she caught wind of the ongoing construction of Veteran's Village in Carson, California — a 51-unit affordable housing development with one, two and three-bedroom apartments and supportive services to residents through a partnership with U.S.VETS.

Her feelings of hope quickly blossomed into a vision for her future when she learned that Veteran's Village was taking applications for residents to move in later that year after construction was complete.

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The Hill/Twitter

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Today, he's bumped up that date by two full months.

That's great news.

In his announcement to the nation, Biden outlined the updated process for getting the country immunized against COVID-19.


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Courtesy of Creative Commons
True

After years of service as a military nurse in the naval Marine Corps, Los Angeles, California-resident Rhonda Jackson became one of the 37,000 retired veterans in the U.S. who are currently experiencing homelessness — roughly eight percent of the entire homeless population.

"I was living in a one-bedroom apartment with no heat for two years," Jackson said. "The Department of Veterans Affairs was doing everything they could to help but I was not in a good situation."

One day in 2019, Jackson felt a sudden sense of hope for a better living arrangement when she caught wind of the ongoing construction of Veteran's Village in Carson, California — a 51-unit affordable housing development with one, two and three-bedroom apartments and supportive services to residents through a partnership with U.S.VETS.

Her feelings of hope quickly blossomed into a vision for her future when she learned that Veteran's Village was taking applications for residents to move in later that year after construction was complete.

"I was entered into a lottery and I just said to myself, 'Okay, this is going to work out,'" Jackson said. "The next thing I knew, I had won the lottery — in more ways than one."

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You know that feeling you get when you walk into a classroom and see someone else's stuff on your desk?

OK, sure, there are no assigned seats, but you've been sitting at the same desk since the first day and everyone knows it.

So why does the guy who sits next to you put his phone, his book, his charger, his lunch, and his laptop in the space that's rightfully yours? It's annoying!

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via ABC News

Julia Tinetti, 31, and Cassandra Madison, 32, first met in 2013 while working at The Russian Lady, a bar in New Haven, Connecticut, and the two immediately hit it off.

"We started hanging out together. We went out for drinks, dinner," Julia told "Good Morning America." "I thought she was cool. We hit it off right away," added Cassandra

The two also shared a strong physical resemblance and matching tattoos of the flag of the Dominican Republic. They had a bond that was so unique, even their coworkers thought there must be something more happening.

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