Tinder deleted George Zimmerman's profile and banned him from the app in the name of public safety.
Images via Creative Loafing/screenshots from Tinder

Believe it or not, there are worse things than unsolicited sexual harassment on dating apps.

George Zimmerman was acquitted of shooting and killing an unarmed 17-year-old Trayvon Martin in 2012. Since then, he’s been keeping a low profile, but apparently that doesn’t extend to his dating profile.

Zimmerman was recently banned from Tinder after he created a profile on the app under a fake name.


Screenshots of Zimmerman’s Tinder profile (including the requisite smiling while holding a dog photo) were captured by Creative Loafing Tampa Bay.

Zimmerman aka“Carter” listed himself a “Consultant, Self-Employed,” and a Liberty University graduate.

“I’m looking for carefree, fun,” Zimmerman’s profile used to read. “I love the outdoors, fishing camping and hiking. I love adventure not into huge crowds. I’m also down for a quiet night with Longhorn takeout.”

He didn’t list his other interests, which include allegedly throwing a bottle of wine at his ex-girlfriend, and allegedly stalking a private investigator hired by a production company working on a documentary about Martin, and apparently not using commas correctly in his dating app profile.

Images via Creative Loafing/screenshots from Tinder

Images via Creative Loafing/screenshots from Tinder

Images via Creative Loafing/screenshots from Tinder

How is he still single? Oh. Right…

“We take the safety of our users very seriously and acted appropriately once the profile was discovered,” Tinder said in a statement. “We utilize a network of industry-leading automated and manual moderation and review tools, systems and processes — and spend millions of dollars annually — to prevent, monitor and remove bad actors who have violated our Community Guidelines and Terms of Use from our app.” They didn’t elaborate on the matter beyond that, but then again, do they really need to?

This isn’t the first time Zimmerman’s been removed from a dating app.

He was also banned by Bumble in 2018. “George Zimmerman was blocked and banned in December 2018 when we first discovered his profile and we have blocked and banned him again after we were informed by our users that he had created a new unverified profile,” Bumble said. “We have thousands of moderators working tirelessly with our users to make Bumble the safest and most empowering social networking platform and this is another example of those efforts.”

Zimmerman’s old Bumble profile listed the former neighborhood watch coordinator as a “jury consultant” (whatever that is), with only a high school education. He said he loves cake pops and was looking for a mature woman.

According to Creative Loafing, Zimmerman is still floating around on OK Cupid and still using cheesy pickup lines.

You never know what creeps you’re going to run across on dating apps, so be careful out there!

Courtesy of Verizon
True

If someone were to say "video games" to you, what are the first words that come to mind? Whatever words you thought of (fun, exciting, etc.), we're willing to guess "healthy" or "mental health tool" didn't pop into your mind.

And yet… it turns out they are. Especially for Veterans.

How? Well, for one thing, video games — and virtual reality more generally — are also more accessible and less stigmatized to veterans than mental health treatment. In fact, some psychiatrists are using virtual reality systems for this reason to treat PTSD.

Secondly, video games allow people to socialize in new ways with people who share common interests and goals. And for Veterans, many of whom leave the military feeling isolated or lonely after they lose the daily camaraderie of their regiment, that socialization is critical to their mental health. It gives them a virtual group of friends to talk with, connect to, and relate to through shared goals and interests.

In addition, according to a 2018 study, since many video games simulate real-life situations they encountered during their service, it makes socialization easier since they can relate to and find common ground with other gamers while playing.

This can help ease symptoms of depression, anxiety, and even PTSD in Veterans, which affects 20% of the Veterans who have served since 9/11.

Watch here as Verizon dives into the stories of three Veteran gamers to learn how video games helped them build community, deal with trauma and have some fun.

Band of Gamers www.youtube.com

Video games have been especially beneficial to Veterans since the beginning of the pandemic when all of us — Veterans included — have been even more isolated than ever before.

And that's why Verizon launched a challenge last year, which saw $30,000 donated to four military charities.

And this year, they're going even bigger by launching a new World of Warships charity tournament in partnership with Wargaming and Wounded Warrior Project called "Verizon Warrior Series." During the tournament, gamers will be able to interact with the game's iconic ships in new and exciting ways, all while giving back.

Together with these nonprofits, the tournament will welcome teams all across the nation in order to raise money for military charities helping Veterans in need. There will be a $100,000 prize pool donated to these charities, as well as donation drives for injured Veterans at every match during the tournament to raise extra funds.

Verizon is also providing special discounts to Those Who Serve communities, including military and first responders, and they're offering a $75 in-game content military promo for World of Warships.

Tournament finals are scheduled for August 8, so be sure to tune in to the tournament and donate if you can in order to give back to Veterans in need.

Courtesy of Verizon

@SubwayCreatures / Twitter

A man who uses a wheelchair fell onto the tracks in a New York City subway station on Wednesday afternoon. A CBS New York writer was at the scene of the incident and says that people rushed to save the man after they heard him "whimpering."

It's unclear why the man fell onto the tracks.

A brave rescuer risked his life by jumping on the tracks to get the man to safety knowing that the train would come barreling in at any second. The footage is even more dramatic because you can hear the station's PA system announce that the train is on its way.

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