This touching music video showcases moms of all identities for Mother's Day.

When a Houston-based band, The Suffers, wanted to show their moms some love for Mother's Day, they decided to sing to them.

In an adorable, tear-jerking music video, The Suffers brought "Mammas" to life by celebrating their own mothers — and featuring queer parenting too.

All images from "Mammas" by The Suffers, used with permission.


The heartwarming video highlights moms and their love for their kids. It focuses on the eight band members' own experiences with their moms, but kicks off with a queer couple who are featured throughout the video. All the band members fell in love with this approach.

"The family unit as we know it is evolving," says lead singer Kam Franklin. "There is no one way to be a mother. So we have this representation because it exists and lesbians can be mothers just in the same way straight moms and single parents can."

As LGBTQ parenting continues to become normalized, The Suffers' bold celebration of queer parenting is more important than ever. Roughly 6 million American children have LGBTQ parents, a number that will likely rise in coming years.

"I hope that we're evolving as a society to where people are either just going to get over it or realize that they're going to be that person, and the world is going to keep turning."

Set to some incredibly powerful vocals and instrumentals, the music video features adorable clips of each band member telling their mom just how awesome they are.

The idea for the music video came to lead singer Franklin after a few holiday drinks with family.

"I just became really aware of how much I appreciated [my mother] and everything that we've gone through as a family," Franklin says. "It took me some time and some growing to learn that she's not this perfect person, but at the same time she is because she's my mother. She's my hero."

"Do you know?
Oh, do you know?
Do you know how loved you are?"

According to Franklin, the band attempts to recognize that moms are not these perfect, untouchable humans, and coming to terms with this reality makes the love between a parent and child all the more powerful. To further that message of authentic human experiences, each mother reads a letter from their child on camera. Some of the letters ask for forgiveness and wisdom; others offer forgiveness for past mistakes and arguments.

The music video gave the band members a rare opportunity to recognize their moms as the humans they are — both flawed and wonderful at the same time.

"There's this saying that 'parents just don't understand,'" Franklin says, "I feel like that's a lie. I feel like it's us, the kids, that don't understand because we haven't lived this life. We haven't been through this yet. I know everybody's parents aren't great, but for the most part, what you should see [in your mother] is someone that only wanted the best for you and only wanted to protect you in this crazy world."

Franklin's point rings true for many. While everyone has unique experiences with their mother, the impact of motherhood is simply invaluable.

Many mothers work full-time, are often still responsible for many domestic responsibilities, and have an array of other different tasks and responsibilities to maintain. Yet, through it all, they find a way to offer a maternal love that comes in all ethnicities, sexualities, and identities.

While not everyone might have a great relationship with their mom, it’s important to recognize moms who have given their lives to being badass, awesome, empowering parents. Their sacrifices and love are invaluable.

Do you know how loved you are?

Call your mom, and I bet you'll find out.

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If the past year has taught us nothing else, it's that sending love out into the world through selfless acts of kindness can have a positive ripple effect on people and communities. People all over the United States seemed to have gotten the message — 71% of those surveyed by the World Giving Index helped a stranger in need in 2020. A nonprofit survey found 90% helped others by running errands, calling, texting and sending care packages. Many people needed a boost last year in one way or another and obliging good neighbors heeded the call over and over again — and continue to make a positive impact through their actions in this new year.

Upworthy and P&G Good Everyday wanted to help keep kindness going strong, so they partnered up to create the Lead with Love Fund. The fund awards do-gooders in communities around the country with grants to help them continue on with their unique missions. Hundreds of nominations came pouring in and five winners were selected based on three criteria: the impact of action, uniqueness, and "Upworthy-ness" of their story.

Here's a look at the five winners:

Edith Ornelas, co-creator of Mariposas Collective in Memphis, Tenn.

Edith Ornelas has a deep-rooted connection to the asylum-seeking immigrant families she brings food and supplies to families in Memphis, Tenn. She was born in Jalisco, Mexico, and immigrated to the United States when she was 7 years old with her parents and sister. Edith grew up in Chicago, then moved to Memphis in 2016, where she quickly realized how few community programs existed for immigrants. Two years later, she helped create Mariposas Collective, which initially aimed to help families who had just been released from detention centers and were seeking asylum. The collective started out small but has since grown to approximately 400 volunteers.