This touching music video showcases moms of all identities for Mother's Day.

When a Houston-based band, The Suffers, wanted to show their moms some love for Mother's Day, they decided to sing to them.

In an adorable, tear-jerking music video, The Suffers brought "Mammas" to life by celebrating their own mothers — and featuring queer parenting too.

All images from "Mammas" by The Suffers, used with permission.


The heartwarming video highlights moms and their love for their kids. It focuses on the eight band members' own experiences with their moms, but kicks off with a queer couple who are featured throughout the video. All the band members fell in love with this approach.

"The family unit as we know it is evolving," says lead singer Kam Franklin. "There is no one way to be a mother. So we have this representation because it exists and lesbians can be mothers just in the same way straight moms and single parents can."

As LGBTQ parenting continues to become normalized, The Suffers' bold celebration of queer parenting is more important than ever. Roughly 6 million American children have LGBTQ parents, a number that will likely rise in coming years.

"I hope that we're evolving as a society to where people are either just going to get over it or realize that they're going to be that person, and the world is going to keep turning."

Set to some incredibly powerful vocals and instrumentals, the music video features adorable clips of each band member telling their mom just how awesome they are.

The idea for the music video came to lead singer Franklin after a few holiday drinks with family.

"I just became really aware of how much I appreciated [my mother] and everything that we've gone through as a family," Franklin says. "It took me some time and some growing to learn that she's not this perfect person, but at the same time she is because she's my mother. She's my hero."

"Do you know?
Oh, do you know?
Do you know how loved you are?"

According to Franklin, the band attempts to recognize that moms are not these perfect, untouchable humans, and coming to terms with this reality makes the love between a parent and child all the more powerful. To further that message of authentic human experiences, each mother reads a letter from their child on camera. Some of the letters ask for forgiveness and wisdom; others offer forgiveness for past mistakes and arguments.

The music video gave the band members a rare opportunity to recognize their moms as the humans they are — both flawed and wonderful at the same time.

"There's this saying that 'parents just don't understand,'" Franklin says, "I feel like that's a lie. I feel like it's us, the kids, that don't understand because we haven't lived this life. We haven't been through this yet. I know everybody's parents aren't great, but for the most part, what you should see [in your mother] is someone that only wanted the best for you and only wanted to protect you in this crazy world."

Franklin's point rings true for many. While everyone has unique experiences with their mother, the impact of motherhood is simply invaluable.

Many mothers work full-time, are often still responsible for many domestic responsibilities, and have an array of other different tasks and responsibilities to maintain. Yet, through it all, they find a way to offer a maternal love that comes in all ethnicities, sexualities, and identities.

While not everyone might have a great relationship with their mom, it’s important to recognize moms who have given their lives to being badass, awesome, empowering parents. Their sacrifices and love are invaluable.

Do you know how loved you are?

Call your mom, and I bet you'll find out.

Photo by Tim Mossholder on Unsplash
True

Glenda moved to Houston from Ohio just before the pandemic hit. She didn't know that COVID-19-related delays would make it difficult to get her Texas driver's license and apply for unemployment benefits. She quickly found herself in an impossible situation — stranded in a strange place without money for food, gas, or a job to provide what she needed.

Alone, hungry, and scared, Glenda dialed 2-1-1 for help. The person on the other end of the line directed her to the Houston-based nonprofit Bread of Life, founded by St. John's United Methodist pastors Rudy and Juanita Rasmus.

For nearly 30 years, Bread of Life has been at the forefront of HIV/AIDS prevention, eliminating food insecurity, providing permanent housing to formerly homeless individuals and disaster relief.

Glenda sat in her car for 20 minutes outside of the building, trying to muster up the courage to get out and ask for help. She'd never been in this situation before, and she was terrified.

When she finally got out, she encountered Eva Thibaudeau, who happened to be walking down the street at the exact same time. Thibaudeau is the CEO of Temenos CDC, a nonprofit multi-unit housing development also founded by the Rasmuses, with a mission to serve Midtown Houston's homeless population.

Keep Reading Show less

A photo of Joe Biden hugging and kissing his only living son, Hunter, is circulating after Newsmax TV host John Cardillo shared it on Twitter with the caption, "Does this look like an appropriate father/son interaction to you?"

The question is clearly meant to be a dig at Biden, whose well-documented life in politics includes many examples of both his deep love for his family and his physical expressions of affection. While his opponents have cherry-picked photos to try to paint him as "creepy," those who know him well—and who are in some of those viral images—defend Biden's expressions of affection as those of a close friend and grandfatherly figure. (And in fact, at least one photo of Biden holding and kissing a child's face was of him and his grandson at his son Beau's funeral, taken as a still shot from this video.)

Everyone has their own level of comfort with physical space and everyone's line of what's appropriate when it comes to physical affection are different, but some accusations of inappropriateness are just...sad. And this photo with this caption is one of those cases.

Keep Reading Show less
Photo by Tim Mossholder on Unsplash
True

Glenda moved to Houston from Ohio just before the pandemic hit. She didn't know that COVID-19-related delays would make it difficult to get her Texas driver's license and apply for unemployment benefits. She quickly found herself in an impossible situation — stranded in a strange place without money for food, gas, or a job to provide what she needed.

Alone, hungry, and scared, Glenda dialed 2-1-1 for help. The person on the other end of the line directed her to the Houston-based nonprofit Bread of Life, founded by St. John's United Methodist pastors Rudy and Juanita Rasmus.

For nearly 30 years, Bread of Life has been at the forefront of HIV/AIDS prevention, eliminating food insecurity, providing permanent housing to formerly homeless individuals and disaster relief.

Glenda sat in her car for 20 minutes outside of the building, trying to muster up the courage to get out and ask for help. She'd never been in this situation before, and she was terrified.

When she finally got out, she encountered Eva Thibaudeau, who happened to be walking down the street at the exact same time. Thibaudeau is the CEO of Temenos CDC, a nonprofit multi-unit housing development also founded by the Rasmuses, with a mission to serve Midtown Houston's homeless population.

Keep Reading Show less
via Witty Buttons / Twitter

Back in 2017, when white supremacist Richard Spencer was socked in the face by someone wearing all black at Trump's inauguration, it launched an online debate, "Is it OK to punch a Nazi?"

The essential nature of the debate was whether it was acceptable for people to act violently towards someone with repugnant reviews, even if they were being peaceful. Some suggested people should confront them peacefully by engaging in a debate or at least make them feel uncomfortable being Nazi in public.

Keep Reading Show less
via Spencer Cox / Twitter

In the middle of a heated election, liberal and conservative Americans are at odds over a lot of issues, but there's one thing they can agree on, they're sick of all the political acrimony.

A 2018 PBS poll found that nearly three-quarters of Americans — 74 percent — think the overall tone and level of civility in the nation's capital have gotten worse since Trump was elected.

Seventy-nine percent are "are concerned or very concerned that the negative tone of national politics will prompt violence."

Keep Reading Show less