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This test will tell you whether you're prejudiced without knowing it. Here's how it works.

Mahzarin Banaji, a Harvard professor and professional not-racist, developed a test that determined whether or not a person has racist biases with two colleagues. When she took the test herself, it told her she was biased.Her first thought was, “Something's wrong with this test."

This test will tell you whether you're prejudiced without knowing it. Here's how it works.

In an interview with The Boston Globe she said:

"I've spent a lot of my life thinking about these issues. I am, myself, an immigrant. I was aware of the history of black-white relations; I had strived in my own life to practice what I believe. And among my peers, I have the reputation of someone who understands these issues and cares about them. I should certainly not have trouble."

Here's how the test works.


First you'll match good things and bad things.

Then you match people with race.

Then it gets combined.

You'll see faces and words and match them. "European American" and "Good" is on one side and "African American" and "Bad" on the other side.


Then it gets switched.

You'll see faces and words again, but this time "European American" and "Bad" share a side while "African American" and "Good" share a side.

If you do both tasks at the same speed, then congrats!

But if there is big difference in the speed, it means you have a hard time associating a race with an attribute opposite of your unconscious beliefs.


But why do we need a test? We all know what racism looks like.

It offends us. We don't want to be associated with it in any way. When we see or hear it from the people foremost in our society, we are quick to denounce it and demand change.

These celebrities were swiftly, severely, and publicly shamed for making EXPLICITLY racist statements.

We don't need a test to tell us when something is explicitly racist. It's obvious on its face. But explicit bias isn't the only kind of bias out there making the world a more bummery place to be.

We need a test because implicit bias is different. It's insidious and hard to spot.

Here's how Ohio State University's Kirwan School for the Study of Race and Ethnicity defines implicit bias.

"Also known as implicit social cognition, implicit bias refers to the attitudes or stereotypes that affect our understanding, actions, and decisions in an unconscious manner.

These biases, which encompass both favorable and unfavorable assessments, are activated involuntarily and without an individual's awareness or intentional control.

Residing deep in the subconscious, these biases are different from known biases that individuals may choose to conceal for the purposes of social and/or political correctness.

Rather, implicit biases are not accessible through introspection."





It doesn't show itself in glaringly discriminatory words and deeds. It shows itself in tiny behavioral patterns that are hard to spot until you examine society as a whole.

It's not that women are just worse at running companies or that black men should be punished harder. Some other force is at work.

If you show a bias, don't take it personally. Almost everyone does. (I did too!) Take it as a moment to celebrate because now you know more about yourself than you did before.

Use that knowledge to make sure you're doing your best to give everyone a fair shake.

Photo courtesy of Justin Sather
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Upworthy and GoFundMe are celebrating ideas that make the world a better, kinder place. Visit upworthy.com/kindness to join the largest collaboration for human kindness in history and start your own GoFundMe.

While most 10-year-olds are playing Minecraft, riding bikes, or watching YouTube videos, Justin Sather is intent on saving the planet. And it all started with a frog blanket when he was a baby.

"He carried it everywhere," Justin's mom tells us. "He had frog everything, even a frog-themed birthday party."

In kindergarten, Justin learned that frogs are an indicator species – animals, plants, or microorganisms used to monitor drastic changes in our environment. With nearly one-third of frog species on the verge of extinction due to pollution, pesticides, contaminated water, and habitat destruction, Justin realized that his little amphibian friends had something important to say.

"The frogs are telling us the planet needs our help," says Justin.

While it was his love of frogs that led him to understand how important the species are to our ecosystem, it wasn't until he read the children's book What Do You Do With An Idea by Kobi Yamada that Justin-the-activist was born.

Inspired by the book and with his mother's help, he set out on a mission to raise funds for frog habitats by selling toy frogs in his Los Angeles neighborhood. But it was his frog art which incorporated scientific facts that caught people's attention. Justin's message spread from neighbor to neighbor and through social media; so much so that he was able to raise $2,000 for the non-profit Save The Frogs.

And while many kids might have their 8th birthday party at a laser tag center or a waterslide park, Justin invited his friends to the Ballona wetlands ecological preserve to pick invasive weeds and discuss the harms of plastic pollution.

Justin's determination to save the frogs and help the planet got a massive boost when he met legendary conservationist Dr. Jane Goodall.

Photo courtesy of Justin Sather

At one of her Roots and Shoots youth initiative events, Dr. Goodall was so impressed with Justin's enthusiasm for helping frogs, she challenged the young activist to take it one step further and focus on plastic pollution as well. Justin accepted her challenge and soon after was featured in an issue of Bravery Magazine dedicated to Jane Goodall.

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They Liked Her Because She ‘Talked White.’ I Bet They Didn’t Expect This.

Sometimes what people may consider to be a compliment is actually horribly offensive.

This article originally appeared on 01.28.15


This is one of those times.

An incredible woman has the perfect response for someone who says, "You speak so well ... for a black girl."

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