This 11-year-old was bullied for her skin color. She launched a company to fight racism.

When she was in first grade, Kheris Rogers asked if she could spend some extra time in the bathtub.

After kids at school had bullied her for her complexion, Kheris believed soaking in water might lighten her dark skin.

Rogers was one of only four black kids in her Los Angeles classroom. When speaking with CNBC about her experience, she remembered that once her teacher had given her a black crayon to draw a self-portrait. All the other black students, she recalled, were given brown ones.


Even a move to a new school didn't help. As she progressed through the next few grades, Rogers found herself the victim of colorism — other black children made fun of her for being darker than them.

So Rogers' older sister, Taylor Pollard, decided to do something about it.

To make her younger sister feel proud, fierce, and confident, 23-year-old Pollard posted a picture of Kheris with a saying that their grandma used to make them feel proud of their color: "Flexin' in my complexion."

The response was overwhelming. Pollard's original tweet (before it was accidentally deleted) received over 100,000 likes, and she received emails of praise.

The feedback inspired Kheris, and with Pollard's help, the two started a clothing company to celebrate all complexions.

With $100 from their mom, a website they cobbled together using online instructions, and some help with screen-printing, they started fighting racism with a line of awesome T-shirts that featured their grandma's saying in bold type (among other items).

At 10 (she recently turned 11), Kheris had become the owner of her own business.

And celebrities including Lena Waithe and Lupita Nyong'o are proudly sporting her clothes left and right.

Kheris transformed her experience into an important inspiration for change.

Historically, light skin has been positioned as most desirable in our society. And research has found that this has a major effect on kids who aren't caucasian, leading to bias and maltreatment among small children whose complexions are darker than peach crayons.

Rogers' success is a step for progress and a clear reminder that we should all take a hard look at how racism is affecting younger generations, recognize it's an issue that needs to be at the center of the public consciousness, and embolden our youth in fighting to end it.

Of course, we've also got to celebrate Rogers' come-up. She's already an icon.

True

This year more than ever, many families are anticipating an empty dinner table. Shawn Kaplan lived this experience when his father passed away, leaving his mother who struggled to provide food for her two children. Shawn is now a dedicated volunteer and donor with Second Harvest Food Bank in Middle Tennessee and encourages everyone to give back this holiday season with Amazon.

Watch the full story:

Over one million people in Tennessee are at risk of hunger every day. And since the outbreak of COVID-19, Second Harvest has seen a 50% increase in need for their services. That's why Amazon is Delivering Smiles and giving back this holiday season by fulfilling hundreds of AmazonSmile Charity Lists, donating essential pantry and food items to help organizations like Second Harvest to feed those hit the hardest this year.

Visit AmazonSmile Charity Lists to donate directly to a local food bank or charity in your community, or simply shop smile.amazon.com and Amazon will donate a portion of the purchase price of eligible products to your selected charity.

via Brittany Kinley / Facebook

Brittany Kinley, a mother from Mansfield, Texas, had a hilarious mom fail her and she's chalking it up to being just another crazy thing that happened in 2020.

When Kinley filled out the order form for her son Mason's kindergarten class pictures, there was an option to have his name engraved into the photos. But Kinley wasn't interested in having her son's name on the photos so she wrote "I DON'T WANT THIS" on the box.

Well, it appears as though she should have left the box blank because the computer or incredibly literal human that designed the photographs wrote "I DON'T WANT THIS" where mason's name should be.

Keep Reading Show less
True

A lot of people here are like family to me," Michelle says about Bread for the City — a community nonprofit located in Washington DC that provides local residents with food, clothing, health care, social advocacy, and legal services. And since the pandemic began, the need to support organizations like Bread for the City is greater than ever, which is why Amazon is Delivering Smiles to local charities across the country this holiday season.

Watch the full story:

Amazon is giving back by fulfilling hundreds of AmazonSmile Charity Lists, and donating essential pantry and food items to help organizations like Bread for the City provide to those disproportionately impacted this year.

Visit AmazonSmile Charity Lists to donate directly to a local charity in your community, or simply shop smile.amazon.com and Amazon will donate a portion of the purchase price of eligible products to your charity of choice.

Somewhere in Salt Lake City, a Girl Scout is getting allll the good mojo from The People of the Internet.

Over the weekend, Eli McCann shared a story of an encounter at a Girl Scout cookie stand that has people throwing their fists in the air and shouting, YES! THAT'S HOW IT'S DONE. (Or maybe that's just me. But I'm guessing most of the 430,000 people who liked his story had a similar reaction.)

Keep Reading Show less
via UDOT / Facebook

In December 2018, The Utah Department of Transportation opened the largest wildlife overpass in the state, spanning 320 by 50 feet across all six lanes of Interstate 80.

Its construction was intended to make traveling through the I-80 corridor in Summit County safer for motorists and the local wildlife.

The Salt Lake Tribune reports that there were over 100 animal incidents on the interstate since 2016, giving the stretch of highway the unfortunate nickname of "Slaughter Row."

Keep Reading Show less