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The Top 5 Countries For Gender Equality In 2014 Are All In One Place. I Want To Go There.

Get your winter gear on. You're going to the Nordic countries.

The Top 5 Countries For Gender Equality In 2014 Are All In One Place. I Want To Go There.

In a world that makes more sense, women and men would have exactly the same opportunities. But that's not the world we live in. Women in this one have a far more difficulties than men accessing things that allow for healthy, happy lives. This systemic unfairness has a name. It's called the "gender gap."

The Global Gender Gap Report 2014 from the World Economic Forum takes a look at how well the world is doing at leveling the playing field between women and men.


The gender-gap report rates 142 countries on four things:

  • Health

  • Education

  • Earning potential

  • Political empowerment

The WEF looks at all of these things to try to get the whole story of women's lives in each country.

A deep dive into the report takes you inside each nation's culture. Whoa on what's in here.

Maybe the most fun is seeing where countries rank overall.

Of the 111 counties tracked since the first report in 2006, 105 are making progress.

Things in the report are all pretty much eye-opening.

The top two Arab countries for gender equality?

And the U.S. just crept back into the top 20. Hmm.

No country's closed the gender gap completely, but the Nordic countries are about 85% of the way there.

The top five gender-equal countries.

Want to know how your country ranks? Click here for an interactive map.

If you browse through the report, trust me, you won't regret it. It's a fascinating peek into other places, and it also gives you a clear-eyed picture of how we're doing.

Here's a video tour of the report's highlights.

A young boy tried to grab the Pope's skull cap

A boy of about 10-years-old with a mental disability stole the show at Pope Francis' weekly general audience on Wednesday at the Vatican auditorium. In front of an audience of thousands the boy walked past security and onto the stage while priests delivered prayers and introductory speeches.

The boy, later identified as Paolo, Jr., greeted the pope by shaking his hand and when it was clear that he had no intention of leaving, the pontiff asked Monsignor Leonardo Sapienza, the head of protocol, to let the boy borrow his chair.

The boy's activity on the stage was clearly a breach of Vatican protocol but Pope Francis didn't seem to be bothered one bit. He looked at the child with a sense of joy and wasn't even disturbed when he repeatedly motioned that he wanted to remove his skull cap.

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