Homer reads a list of 50 reasons not to vote for Trump in 'The Simpsons' upcoming Halloween episode
via Fox

On October 18, "The Simpsons" will debut it's 31st "Treehouse of Terror" Halloween episode. This year's show includes parodies of Pixar, "Toy Story," "Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse" and Netflix's "Russian Doll."

A minute-long preview teasing the Halloween tradition also touches on a night that will be one of the scariest of our lifetimes. Millions of Americans are fearing what could go wrong on election day after living through the horror of 2016.

In the trailer, Homer is stuck in the voting booth, unsure of who to vote for for president. His progressive daughter, Lisa, steps into the booth to remind Homer of everything that has happened in the past four years.


"Dad, by all that's decent, how could you forget everything that's happened the last four years?" Lisa asks.

All Homer can conjure up is when Faye Dunaway announced the name of the wrong film at the 2020 Oscars.

So, for the benefit of Homer and undecided voters across America, a list scrolls before the Simpsons' patriarch reminding him of 50 of the terirble things Trump has done throughout his political career.

The Simpsons' Treehouse of Horror Lists 50 Reasons Not to Vote Trump www.youtube.com


The list:

Made it okay to shoot hibernating bears

Put children in cages

Called Mexicans rapists

Imitated disabled reporter

Looks lousy in a tennis outfit

Can't get wife to hold hand

Called third world countries ****holes

Called Tim Cook 'Tim Apple'

Said Jewish people who vote Democrat are disloyal

Showed top secret documents at Mar-A-Lago restaurant

Called white supremacists 'fine people'

Leaked classified information to Russian ambassador

Asked the president of Ukraine to investigate the Bidens

Called for China to investigate the Bidens

Walked into the dressing room at Miss Teen USA pageant

Pressed the Australian prime minister to help Barr investigate Mueller

Talked about grabbing *****

Lied about the size of his inauguration

Refused to release tax returns

Gutted the E.P.A.

Confiscated and destroyed interpreter's notes after meeting with Putin

Tweeted classified photo of Iran missile site

Called Baltimore a 'disgusting, rat and rodent-infested mess'

Described Meryl Streep as 'over-rated'

Leaked information to the press about the 2017 Manchester arena bombing

Did not attend any White House correspondents' dinner

Said Megyn Kelly had 'blood coming out of her whatever'

Called Carly Fiorina 'horseface'

Ruined impeachment

Brought Ivanka to the G7 summit

Corrupted Congress

Appointed and didn't fire Betsy DeVos

Put Jared in charge of Mideast

Served McDonald's to Clemson football team

Destroyed democracy

Lost Hong Kong

Threatened Marie Yovanovitch

Pulled the U.S. out of climate agreement

Allowed bounties on soldiers

Invaded Portland

Withdrew from W.H.O.

Bragged about knowing the date

Commuted sentences

Said to swallow bleach

Person, woman, man, camera, TV

Destroyed post office

Paid $750 in taxes

Wants third term

Wanted to be on Mount Rushmore

And we haven't even said the worst one

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My first car, for example, was a hand-me-down Toyota of some sort from my mother. I don’t recall the specific model, but I definitely remember getting into a fender bender within the first week of having it. She had forgotten to get the brakes fixed … isn’t that a fun story?

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