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The real reason behind this year's warmer winter weather. (It’s not just global warming.)

It’s been a hot year — the hottest year on record, according to climate experts.

The real reason behind this year's warmer winter weather. (It’s not just global warming.)

I know I’m not the only one thinking this doesn't feel like normal winter weather.

I spent Christmas Day this year wearing shorts. Shorts! And when I was packing for the holidays, I didn’t even bother throwing a jacket into my suitcase because the forecast showed a full week of balmy days with highs in the 80s.

The records show it, too: It's been a hot winter.

In fact, it’s been a hot year — the hottest year on record, according to climate experts. That can be a little scary for those of us following the quick progress of climate change.


It’s pretty easy to feel like Jake Gyllenhaal in "The Day After Tomorrow" when you have a bigger risk of getting heatstroke than seeing snow in late December.

The good news, though, is that global warming isn’t solely responsible for the warm weather this month.

Climatologists say we’re in the middle of El Niño right now, which happens every few years. And this time around, it’s been particularly strong.

How does El Niño work? Every few years, the water in the Pacific Ocean gets a little warmer than usual during the winter. Greenhouse gases warm the Earth, oceans absorb that heat, and then El Niño drives up the temps a few extra degrees.

A summer beach day? Nope, just people enjoying the beach on Dec. 13, 2015, in Fairfield, Connecticut. Photo by Spencer Platt/Getty Images.

That little change in temperature patterns can spiral into massive changes in weather around the world, making certain areas (like the northern U.S.) drier and warmer while other places get a lot more rainfall.

Climate change has played a role in making our weather more extreme, though.

Some climate scientists are saying that global warming has "supercharged" El Niño, making this year's weather patterns waaay more intense than they'd usually be.

So we're seeing summery days in the middle of the winter — and worse. Across the globe, there have also been droughts, flooding, hurricanes, and fires.

In short, El Niño is the reason behind most of these weird weather events. Global warming is making that weather more powerful and destructive.

So no, you don’t have to worry about never seeing a snowy Christmas ever again because El Niños come and go.

It was almost 70 degrees in New York City on Christmas Eve this year. Photo by Kena Betancur/Getty Images.

But unless we can rein in greenhouse gases, you should probably expect to see more erratic, extreme weather in the future, too. Here's to a northeastern winter full of mittens, scarves, hot cocoa ... and shorts.

Albert Einstein

One of the strangest things about being human is that people of lesser intelligence tend to overestimate how smart they are and people who are highly intelligent tend to underestimate how smart they are.

This is called the Dunning-Kruger effect and it’s proven every time you log onto Facebook and see someone from high school who thinks they know more about vaccines than a doctor.

The interesting thing is that even though people are poor judges of their own smarts, we’ve evolved to be pretty good at judging the intelligence of others.

“Such findings imply that, in order to be adaptive, first impressions of personality or social characteristics should be accurate,” a study published in the journal Intelligence says. “There is accumulating evidence that this is indeed the case—at least to some extent—for traits such as intelligence extraversion, conscientiousness, openness, and narcissism, and even for characteristics such as sexual orientation, political ideology, or antigay prejudice.”

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"I now pronounce you, in debt. You may kiss the bride."

In 1964, Paul McCartney of the Beatles famously sang, “I don’t care too much for money, money can’t buy me love.” While Mr. McCartney’s sentiments were definitely a major foreshadowing of the hippie, free-love movement that was to come in the ‘60s, it appears as though he was also onto a big truth that wouldn’t be proven for another 50 years.

Seven years ago, researchers Hugo M. Mialon and Andrew Francis-Tan from Emory University embarked on the first study to determine whether spending a lot on a wedding or engagement ring meant a marriage would succeed or fail.

The pair wanted to see if the wedding industry was being honest when it came to claims that the more money a couple spends, the more likely they are to stay together.

“The wedding industry has consistently sought to link wedding spending with long-lasting marriages. This paper is the first to examine this relationship statistically,” the researchers wrote.

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Kelly Clarkson and Ariana Grande duked it out on Jimmy Fallon's 'The Tonight Show.'

There are pop stars, and then there are singers. While recording studio technology can make people sound like amazing singers, the proof is in their live performances.

Kelly Clarkson and Ariana Grande took it a whole step further on "The Tonight Show Starring Jimmy Fallon," delivering not only a jaw-dropping live performance but doing so in the form of revolving pop diva hits in an "impossible karaoke" showdown. In less than five minutes, they showed off their combined ability to nail pretty much anything, from imitating iconic singers' styles to belting out well-known songs with their own vocal stylings.

Watch this and try not to be impressed:

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