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At first glance, Senator Kirsten Gillibrand (D-New York) isn't the most likely person to earn praise from her Republican colleagues.

Gillibrand voted against nearly every one of President Donald Trump's cabinet nominees — more "no" votes than any other member of the Senate.

Still, in a recent interview with Rebecca Traister for New York magazine, Gillibrand showed that there's at least one Republican senator with whom she shares a mutual respect: Sen. Susan Collins (R-Maine).


Collins (L) and Gillibrand (R). Photo by Mark Wilson/Getty Images.

The interview is getting attention for Gillibrand's use of colorful language in describing what she sees as Congresses's job, but her blunt language is a small detail in a much more revealing interview.

Gillibrand and Collins represent something important in any profession: what it looks like when women have each others' backs.

In the interview, Gillibrand opened up about her bipartisan friendships and working relationships, touching on everything from the legislation she and Collins filed to protect seniors from fraud to the fact that Gillibrand helped plan Collins' wedding shower a few years back. It's a side of politics we don't usually get to see — or at very least, a side that's often overshadowed.

Gillibrand speaks at the 2016 Democratic National Convention. Photo by Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images.

Women in the world of politics have found clever ways to work together to make their voices heard and find solutions.

"We're here to help people, and if we're not helping people, we should go the fuck home," might be getting the most attention from the interview, but it leaves off the important first part of Gillibrand's statement.

The full quote is actually this:

"I know Susan's worldview is similar to my worldview. Which is that we're here to help people, and if we're not helping people, we should go the fuck home."

That first sentence matters. It's an example of a technique called "amplification," a strategy used with great success by women in the Obama administration, in which they deliberately repeat each others' points in meetings, giving credit to the woman who originally made it, to ensure they were not ignored or overlooked.

In the New York magazine interview, Gillibrand made sure to give Collins credit by name for sharing the view that the government's purpose is to help people (though we can't be sure whether Collins would have phrased it quite the same way).

Obama campaigns in 2008. Photo by Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images.

In 2012, The Daily Beast wrote about how women in the Senate regularly meet for bipartisan dinner parties as a way to build strength in numbers and develop cross-party friendships in the process. In 2013, the group of 20 senators gathered and devised a plan to avert a government shutdown. In 2017, now with 21 senators in their ranks, the women are still getting together, still demonstrating the value of women taking care of women — even when they don't always agree.

"So when it comes to helping one another, we’re just more ready to do it. We want each other to succeed and find a path forward because we really leave the partisan politics at the door," Gillibrand explained in an interview with BuzzFeed.

Senators at the Senate Women Power Workshop in November 2014. Photo by Alex Wong/Getty Images.

Whether it's female staffers amplifying each other's voices in meetings or hosting dinner parties to keep the government afloat, the truth is that women get things done — especially when they have each others' backs.

The state of politics these days is just a tiny bit polarized, and depending on your own political leanings, the politician you see as a hero may be a villain in the eyes of your next-door neighbor. It's all so very subjective and, honestly, a little exhausting.

Even so, there are occasional moments like these that can give us hope while we wander the political wilderness — moments where politicians from opposing parties can actually agree on something. These women remind us of that.

Photo: Jason DeCrow for United Nations Foundation

Honorees, speakers and guests on stage at We the Peoples

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Some people say that while change is inevitable, progress is a choice. In other words, it’s a purposeful act—like when American media mogul and philanthropist Ted Turner established the United Nations Foundation 25 years ago.

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This article originally appeared on 08.02.21


When Qatar's Mutaz Essa Barshim and Italy's Gianmarco Tamberi both landed their high jumps at 2.37 meters, they were in the battle for Olympic gold. But when both jumpers missed the next mark—the Olympic record of 2.39 meters—three times each, they were officially tied for first place.

In such a tie, the athletes would usually do a "jump-off" to determine who wins gold and who wins silver. But as the official began to explain the options to Barshim and Tamberi, Barshim asked, "Can we have two golds?"

"It's possible," the official responded. "It depends, if you both decide..." And before he'd even told them how sharing the gold would work, the two jumpers looked at each other, nodded, and then launched into a wholesome and joyful celebration guaranteed to bring a smile to your face.

Just watch:

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Innovation is awesome, right? I mean, it gave us the internet!

However, there is always a price to pay for modernization, and in this case, it’s in the form of digital eye strain, a group of vision problems that can pop up after as little as two hours of looking at a screen. Some of the symptoms are tired and/or dry eyes, headaches, blurred vision, and neck and shoulder pain1. Ouch!

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via Reddit

This article originally appeared on 07.10.21


When Michael Todd started his freshman year at MLK prep school in Memphis, Tennessee two years ago, he only had one outfit to wear to school. High school kids can be incredibly cruel and Michael was mocked for three weeks for wearing the same clothes every day.

"I really don't have clothes at home," he told KTVI. "My mom can't buy clothes for me because I'm growing too fast."


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Pink sings "Hopelessly Devoted to You."

Pop royalty Pink paid a heartwarming tribute to fellow music icon Olivia Newton-John at the 2022 American Music Awards, which aired this past Sunday, Nov. 20.

Newton-John, who led a lustrous career—including winning 10 AMAs herself—as well as a life dedicated to philanthropy, died of breast cancer at the age of 73 in August of this year. Though Newton-John had a wide variety of beloved hits throughout the years, Pink chose to sing arguably one of her biggest hits of all time, “Hopelessly Devoted to You.”
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Chris Hemsworth and daughter.

This article originally appeared on 08.27.18


In addition to being the star of Marvel franchise "Thor," actor Chris Hemsworth is also a father-of-three? And it turns out, he's pretty much the coolest dad ever.

In a clip from a 2015 interview on "The Ellen DeGeneres Show," Hemsworth shared an interesting conversation he had with his 4-year-old daughter India.

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