At first glance, Senator Kirsten Gillibrand (D-New York) isn't the most likely person to earn praise from her Republican colleagues.

Gillibrand voted against nearly every one of President Donald Trump's cabinet nominees — more "no" votes than any other member of the Senate.

Still, in a recent interview with Rebecca Traister for New York magazine, Gillibrand showed that there's at least one Republican senator with whom she shares a mutual respect: Sen. Susan Collins (R-Maine).


Collins (L) and Gillibrand (R). Photo by Mark Wilson/Getty Images.

The interview is getting attention for Gillibrand's use of colorful language in describing what she sees as Congresses's job, but her blunt language is a small detail in a much more revealing interview.

Gillibrand and Collins represent something important in any profession: what it looks like when women have each others' backs.

In the interview, Gillibrand opened up about her bipartisan friendships and working relationships, touching on everything from the legislation she and Collins filed to protect seniors from fraud to the fact that Gillibrand helped plan Collins' wedding shower a few years back. It's a side of politics we don't usually get to see — or at very least, a side that's often overshadowed.

Gillibrand speaks at the 2016 Democratic National Convention. Photo by Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images.

Women in the world of politics have found clever ways to work together to make their voices heard and find solutions.

"We're here to help people, and if we're not helping people, we should go the fuck home," might be getting the most attention from the interview, but it leaves off the important first part of Gillibrand's statement.

The full quote is actually this:

"I know Susan's worldview is similar to my worldview. Which is that we're here to help people, and if we're not helping people, we should go the fuck home."

That first sentence matters. It's an example of a technique called "amplification," a strategy used with great success by women in the Obama administration, in which they deliberately repeat each others' points in meetings, giving credit to the woman who originally made it, to ensure they were not ignored or overlooked.

In the New York magazine interview, Gillibrand made sure to give Collins credit by name for sharing the view that the government's purpose is to help people (though we can't be sure whether Collins would have phrased it quite the same way).

Obama campaigns in 2008. Photo by Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images.

In 2012, The Daily Beast wrote about how women in the Senate regularly meet for bipartisan dinner parties as a way to build strength in numbers and develop cross-party friendships in the process. In 2013, the group of 20 senators gathered and devised a plan to avert a government shutdown. In 2017, now with 21 senators in their ranks, the women are still getting together, still demonstrating the value of women taking care of women — even when they don't always agree.

"So when it comes to helping one another, we’re just more ready to do it. We want each other to succeed and find a path forward because we really leave the partisan politics at the door," Gillibrand explained in an interview with BuzzFeed.

Senators at the Senate Women Power Workshop in November 2014. Photo by Alex Wong/Getty Images.

Whether it's female staffers amplifying each other's voices in meetings or hosting dinner parties to keep the government afloat, the truth is that women get things done — especially when they have each others' backs.

The state of politics these days is just a tiny bit polarized, and depending on your own political leanings, the politician you see as a hero may be a villain in the eyes of your next-door neighbor. It's all so very subjective and, honestly, a little exhausting.

Even so, there are occasional moments like these that can give us hope while we wander the political wilderness — moments where politicians from opposing parties can actually agree on something. These women remind us of that.

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As you sit down to eat your breakfast in the morning or grab an afternoon snack, take a minute to consider your food, how it was made, and how it got to your plate.

The fruit on your plate were grown and picked on farms, then processed, packaged and sent to the grocery store where you bought them.

Sounds simple, right?

The truth is, that process is anything but simple and at every step in the journey to your plate, harm can be caused to the people who grow it, the communities that need it, and the planet we all call home.

For example, thousands of kids live in food deserts and areas where access to affordable and nutritious food is limited. Around the world, one in three children suffer from some form of malnutrition, and yet, up to 40% of food in the United States is never eaten.

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Kier is a therapist and a family and relationship vlogger who makes videos with his wife Noémie and 2-year-old daughter Emmy. Some of their content is comedic, some of it is serious, but their goal is for all of it to be "100% authentic."

Recently, Kier got real about fatherhood in a video he made while carrying Emmy around the neighborhood on his hip. The video resonated across a wide spectrum of people. I saw it shared by various friends in my own feed, and even by celebrities like Viola Davis.

As anyone who is a parent already knows, raising kids is hard work. It's rewarding and wonderful in many ways, but it's not easy. And if you don't prepare yourself emotionally for the task by working through your own childhood traumas, it's going to be even harder.

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Photo from Dole
True

As you sit down to eat your breakfast in the morning or grab an afternoon snack, take a minute to consider your food, how it was made, and how it got to your plate.

The fruit on your plate were grown and picked on farms, then processed, packaged and sent to the grocery store where you bought them.

Sounds simple, right?

The truth is, that process is anything but simple and at every step in the journey to your plate, harm can be caused to the people who grow it, the communities that need it, and the planet we all call home.

For example, thousands of kids live in food deserts and areas where access to affordable and nutritious food is limited. Around the world, one in three children suffer from some form of malnutrition, and yet, up to 40% of food in the United States is never eaten.

Keep Reading Show less

I saw this poster today and I was going to just let it go, but then I kept feeling tugged to say something.

Melanie Cholish/Facebook

While this poster is great to bring attention to the issue of child trafficking, it is a "shocking" picture of a young girl tied up. It has that dark gritty feeling. I picture her in a basement tied to a dripping pipe.

While that sounds awful, it's important to know that trafficking children in the US is not all of that. I can't say it never is—I don't know. What I do know is most young trafficked children aren't sitting in a basement tied up. They have families, and someone—usually in their family—is trafficking them.

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Photo by Mahir Uysal on Unsplash

Two years ago, I got off the phone after an interview and cried my eyes out. I'd just spent an hour talking to Tim Ballard, the founder of Operation Underground Railroad, an organization that helps fight child sex trafficking, and I just couldn't take it.

Ballard told me about how the training to go undercover as a child predator nearly broke him. He told me an eerie story of a trafficker who could totally compartmentalize, showing Ballard photos of kids he had for sale, then switching gears to proudly show him a photo of his own daughter on her bicycle, just as any parent would. He told me about how lucrative child trafficking is—how a child can bring in three or four times as much as a female prostitute—and how Americans are the industry's biggest consumers.

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