The ‘Cosby’ actor job-shamed for bagging groceries just landed a major acting role.

People who can’t handle criticism, rejection, and long periods without a steady paycheck don’t make it very far in the arts.

Only those with dogged persistence and a drive that won’t be throttled are able to stay the course. A fantastic example of this type of dedication is actor, teacher, and former Trader Joe’s employee, Geoffrey Owens.

Owens played Cliff Huxtable’s (Bill Cosby) son-in-law, Doctor Elvin Tibideaux, on “The Cosby Show” from 1985 to 1992. Since, he has worked consistently as a guest star on numerous TV shows including: "Law & Order," "It's Always Sunny in Philadelphia," and "Lucifer."


He has also taught acting and directing classes.

To continue pursuing his art, 15 months ago, Owens took a job at Trader Joe’s in Clifton, New Jersey 15 where he worked as a cashier. Owens was photographed on-the-job by a woman who noticed him from “The Cosby Show” and the photos emerged in The Daily Mail on August 30.

Images of Owens looking uncomfortable while being photographed quickly went viral. Countless news organizations ran “where are they now” stories on Owens that seemed to ridicule his new job.

But as the story spread, people praised Owens for doing whatever he could to keep acting. Others used Owens’ story as an opportunity to fight back against those who shame people for their jobs.

Owens appeared on “Good Morning America” wearing his Trader Joe’s name tag where he proudly proclaimed that "Every job is worthwhile and valuable.”

One of Owens’ supporters was media mogul Tyler Perry who praised his hustle and invited him to come work on his TV show.

Now, TMZ reports that Owens has accepted a 10-episode role on Perry’s hit OWN drama, “The Haves and the Have Nots.”

He will fly to meet up with the production next week and will promptly begin shooting.

“I’ve learned to never give up,” Owens told People. “A lot of times I was on the verge of quitting the job at Trader Joe’s, but I didn’t because I couldn’t. But it was sufficiently awkward and uncomfortable to be in that kind of job [and be] recognized from time to time.”

“It’s because I kind of hung in there and persevered that all of this amazing stuff has now happened,” he added. “I am someone who generally does persevere, but this confirmed to me how important it is to just hang in there. I think that’s so important for so many people in my industry. You just have to hang on!”
Photo by Louis Hansel on Unsplash
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This story was originally shared on Capital One.

Inside the walls of her kitchen at her childhood home in Guatemala, Evelyn Klohr, the founder of a Washington, D.C.-area bakery called Kakeshionista, was taught a lesson that remains central to her business operations today.

"Baking cakes gave me the confidence to believe in my own brand and now I put my heart into giving my customers something they'll enjoy eating," Klohr said.

While driven to launch her own baking business, pursuing a dream in the culinary arts was economically challenging for Klohr. In the United States, culinary schools can open doors to future careers, but the cost of entry can be upwards of $36,000 a year.

Through a friend, Klohr learned about La Cocina VA, a nonprofit dedicated to providing job training and entrepreneurship development services at a training facility in the Washington, D.C-area.

La Cocina VA's, which translates to "the kitchen" in Spanish, offers its Bilingual Culinary Training program to prepare low-and moderate-income individuals from diverse backgrounds to launch careers in the food industry.

That program gave Klohr the ability to fully immerse herself in the baking industry within a professional kitchen facility and receive training in an array of subjects including culinary skills, food safety, career development and English language classes.

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Vanna White appeared on "The Price Is Right" in 1980.

Vanna White has been a household name in the United States for decades, which is kind of hilarious when you consider how she gained her fame and fortune. Since 1982, the former model and actress has made millions walking back and forth turning letters (and later simply touching them—yay technology) on the game show "Wheel of Fortune."

That's it. Walking back and forth in a pretty evening gown, flipping letters and clapping for contestants. More on that job in a minute…

As a member of Gen X, television game shows like "Wheel of Fortune" and "The Price is Right" send me straight back to my childhood. Watching this clip from 1980 of Vanna White competing on "The Price is Right" two years before she started turning letters on "Wheel of Fortune" is like stepping into a time machine. Bob Barker's voice, the theme music, the sound effects—I swear I'm home from school sick, lying on the ugly flowered couch with my mom checking my forehead and bringing me Tang.

This video has it all: the early '80s hairstyles, a fresh-faced Vanna White and Bob Barker's casual sexism that would never in a million years fly today.

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