For the eighth and final time, President Obama and the first lady welcomed guests to the White House for a Hanukkah reception.

Hanukkah commemorates the Jewish rebellion, led by Judah Maccabee and his brothers against their Greek-Syrian oppressors. After their victory, Judah Maccabee hoped to light an eternal flame to rededicate the Second Temple in Jerusalem, but could only find one vessel of oil. Led by faith, the Jewish people lit the oil, and according to sacred texts, it burned for eight days.

Today, Jewish people celebrate Hanukkah by lighting a candle on a menorah each night. The Obamas and the White House marked the occasion — this time with two Hanukkah receptions in the East Room.

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For the first time ever, Turkey hosted a public Hanukkah celebration.

State officials were among those who attended the first public menorah lighting in the republic's history.

It began, like all great things do, with a Twitter poll.

Ivo Molinas, chief editor of Shalom newspaper in Turkey, asked his 3,200 followers if they would like to see a Hanukkah candle lighting take place in a public square in Istanbul.

Over 3,700 people responded, 40% of whom said that would be a pretty good idea. While not a resounding "yes," it was enough.

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