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Couple thought their wedding had been ruined until islanders came to save the day

Everything that could go wrong (and right) did.

wedding saved by skye islanders, lost luggage

This view might be worth the stress.

Even the best laid wedding plans can go terribly awry. Factor in the uncontrollable variables that come with destination weddings, and at least some kind of chaos or disappointment seems inevitable. Luckily, a little human kindness can turn disastrous circumstances into magical moments.

BBC News shared the story of Amanda and Paul Reisel, a couple from Florida set to marry on the majestic emerald green Isle of Skye in Scotland. With a backdrop like this, it’s easy to see why they chose this gorgeous location.

Amanda and Paul tried their best to prepare responsibly. Good News Network reported that the fiancés had allotted a full four-day window between their flight from Orlando and their arrival in Skye. And yet, everything that could go wrong, did.

Their flight was rerouted, delayed multiple times, and then canceled—leaving Amanda and Paul to spend three solid days stuck in airports—arriving just one day before the wedding. To make matters worse, their luggage was also lost. Everything but the wedding rings … gone. Off to who knows where.

Understandably, the bride was ready to give up. Poor Amanda was even considering "eat[ing] a frozen pizza in the Airbnb and head[ing] home" according to Rosie Woodhouse, the wedding photographer. But Woodhouse, a Skye local, had faith in the kindness of her community, and was determined to help save their big day.

“I told them I was sure I could make this work, and Skye is an amazing place,” Woodhouse told the BBC

Woodhouse’s trust proved to be warranted. Not long after posting the dilemma to a private group for Skye locals called Skye Free Ads, offers from islanders began flooding in—including a full kilt set for Paul, and a lovely wedding dress for Amanda. The dress was extra special since it was lent to Amanda by a local school cafeteria lady, which happened to be what Amanda did back home.

"Wearing it meant even more to me knowing it came from someone who loves and feeds her students just like I do,” Amanda told the BBC.

Despite all the obstacles along the way, Amanda and Paul still ended up having a beautiful ceremony that they can cherish, and maybe laugh about from time to time. Isn’t that what having a wedding is all about?

Needless to say, the newlyweds were moved by the islanders' generosity.

“Every single person Rosie introduced us to and that offered to help will forever have a place in our hearts,” Amanda shared. "The people of Skye will be famous in Orlando because we will tell anyone who will listen that they are the reason our love was cemented into a perfectly imperfect wedding day."

As for the wedding photos, I’d say they're pretty spectacular, wouldn’t you?

Things don’t always go according to plan. But sometimes, they turn out even better than we expected.

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