Ruth Bader Ginsburg says her pancreatic cancer didn't get in the way of her workouts

Ruth Bader Ginsburg is famous for her workouts. When the documentary RBG came out, the trailer started with her pumping iron (or rather, hand weights). In 2017, her personal trainer, Bryant Jonhson, even wrote a book about her, entitled The RBG Workout: How She Stays Strong ... And You Can Too! And when she did her fitness routine with Stephen Colbert, he struggled. The 86-year-old Supreme Court justice still gets her reps in, even after her recent bout with pancreatic cancer. Like that's going to stop her?


Stephen Works Out With Ruth Bader Ginsburg youtu.be



The Notorious RBG mentioned her physical fitness while speaking at the University of California – Berkley School of Law. Ginsburg was part of a lecture honoring the school's first female dean, Herma Hill Kay. Ginsburg was asked if she still hits the gym after receiving three weeks of radiation treatment for a tumor last August. "I never left it," she replied. "Even in my lowest periods I couldn't do very much, but I did what I can."

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Ginsburg told the audience she's doing "very well," compared to how she was six months ago. It's almost an endorsement of picking up the weights, because the one-year survival rate of pancreatic cancer is 20%, and the five-year survival rate is 7%. It's still considered largely incurable.

How do you get a body worthy of the highest court in our country? Ginsburg's workout routine includes planks (instead of sit-ups), weights, and both front and side pushups with her feet (not her knees).

Ginsburg began working out after a battle with colon cancer in 1999. Her husband was concerned about how frail she looked, so she started working out twice a week. Twenty years later, she's still at it. "When I started, I looked like a survivor of Auschwitz," Ginsburg said in an interview. "Now I'm up to 20 push-ups."

RELATED: An inspiring couple shows off the success of working together for healthy weight loss

Ginsburg has been treated for cancer four times. Ginsburg also had pancreatic cancer in 2009, and at the end of 2018, doctors removed two cancerous lumps from her lungs. Ginsburg was absent from the bench for the first time in her career while she recovered. She's not planning on going anywhere. "If you've survived cancer, you have a zest for life that you didn't have before, that you count each day as a blessing," Ginsburg told the audience at Berkley.

At this point, she might just be immortal because of all those planks.

This article originally appeared on November 11, 2015


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Like a lot of people, I grew up reading them. And now, I read them to my kids.

The best!

If that doesn't ring a bell, perhaps this character from the "Busytown" series will. Classic!

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Scarry was an incredibly prolific children's author and illustrator. He created over 250 books during his career. His books were loved across the world — over 100 million were sold in many languages.

But here's something you may not have known about these classics: They've been slowly changing over the years.

Don't panic! They've been changing in a good way.

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Photo by Maxim Hopman on Unsplash

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Any time conversations about wealth and poverty come up, people inevitably start talking about boots.

The standard phrase that comes up is "pull yourself up by your bootstraps," which is usually shorthand for "work harder and don't ask for or expect help." (The fact that the phrase was originally used sarcastically because pulling oneself up by one's bootstraps is literally, physically impossible is rarely acknowledged, but c'est la vie.) The idea that people who build wealth do so because they individually work harder than poor people is baked into the American consciousness and wrapped up in the ideal of the American dream.

A different take on boots and building wealth, however, paints a more accurate picture of what it takes to get out of poverty.

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On Tuesday, Upworthy reported that actor Peter Dinklage was unhappy with Disney’s decision to move forward with a live-action version of “Snow White and the Seven Drawfs” starring Rachel Zegler.

Dinklage praised Disney’s inclusive casting of the “West Side Story” actress, whose mother is of Colombian descent, but pointed out that, at the same time, the company was making a film that promotes damaging stereotypes about people with dwarfism.

"There's a lot of hypocrisy going on, I've gotta say, from being somebody who's a little bit unique," Dinklage told Marc Maron on his “WTF” podcast.

"Well, you know, it's really progressive to cast a—literally no offense to anybody, but I was a little taken aback by, they were very proud to cast a Latino actress as Snow White," Dinklage said, "but you're still telling the story of 'Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs.' Take a step back and look at what you're doing there.”

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