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Police officer fights through tornado to save his K-9 partner

"I love that dog. He's my hip attachment every day of the week. He's a part of our family."

tornado; deer park, Texas; police officer; k-9

Police officer fights through tornado to save his K-9 partner

Dogs really are man's best friend and a police officer in Deer Park, Texas went through a literal tornado to prove it. Recently a tornado tore through the Texas town destroying buildings and whipping debris around making the outdoors a hostile environment. But when officer Joel Nitchman realized the tornado was barreling down while his K-9 partner was still in the car, he jumped into action.

Nitchman told KHOU that the two had just came back from training when the wind began picking up and he knew he needed to get to his dog, "the thought of debris or the car flipping over. I couldn't do that to him. I couldn't have him out there during that." The officer's K-9, Roni has been in several situations where he put himself in danger to help Nitchman according to the officer, this time his human returned the favor.

The entire thing was caught on surveillance cameras and it's quite the sight. At one point in the video you can't even see the police car because the wind and rain is so strong. In fact, the winds are so intense that Roni refused to come out of the car.


"I could barely open the door. When I did...he's a smart dog. He saw what was going on outside and he's like, 'I'm not coming out,'" Nitchman told KHOU. But there wasn't time for negotiations with a scared pup. The partners had to get inside to safety before the tornado picked up and the two became the next Dorothy and Toto.

Luckily for Roni, his human partner was able to coax him out of the car and the duo fought the intense winds to get inside the building.

Watch the amazing video below:


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