This photo of Pink 'shading' Christina Aguilera went viral. Now she's shutting it down.

During the American Music Awards, Christina Aguilera performed an emotional tribute to the late and iconic Whitney Houston.

Houston's ballads are notoriously challenging to sing, and not everyone thought Aguilera was up to the task. Some viewers even took screencaps of different celebrities in the audience who producers cut to during the performance, a few of whom appeared to be cringing or grimacing.

Including singer Pink, whose reaction face went viral on Twitter.


Immediately after the show, Pink posted on Twitter to make things crystal clear: That was no grimace on her face.

The singer noted that she had loved the performance and that people were misinterpreting her awe as discomfort.

"I am in awe of Christina's talent," she wrote. "Show the clip where I'm in tears, you negative Nancy's!"

That didn't stop the "Pink disses Christina!" narrative from spreading across the internet.

The whole thing hearkened back to the pair's admittedly complicated relationship over the years. (Pink has said Aguilera actually tried to punch her once.)

So Pink returned to Twitter two days later with an even stronger message.

"You all perpetuate keeping women apart b/c you're afraid of the power we have when we get together," she wrote.

Her tweet spread far and wide, with over 7,000 retweets along with hundreds of messages of support.

Our culture has a bizarre fascination with Hollywood feuds and friendships gone sour, especially those involving women.

From Debbie Reynolds and Elizabeth Taylor in the late 1950s, to Katy Perry versus Taylor Swift in the 2000s, we can't seem to get enough of who's beefing with whom. Pink says it has to stop.

Not everyone is going to get along or be friends. But in America in 2017, it's counterproductive to celebrate petty divisiveness or, worse, manufacture it where it doesn't exist. The very least we can do is listen to women when they're trying to support each other, instead of forcing them into tired catfight narratives.

In an age where an alarming amount of men in entertainment are being accused of sexual harassment, at best, coercion and rape at worst, it's especially irresponsible to artificially pit women against each other based on split-second facial expressions.

True

If the past year has taught us nothing else, it's that sending love out into the world through selfless acts of kindness can have a positive ripple effect on people and communities. People all over the United States seemed to have gotten the message — 71% of those surveyed by the World Giving Index helped a stranger in need in 2020. A nonprofit survey found 90% helped others by running errands, calling, texting and sending care packages. Many people needed a boost last year in one way or another and obliging good neighbors heeded the call over and over again — and continue to make a positive impact through their actions in this new year.

Upworthy and P&G Good Everyday wanted to help keep kindness going strong, so they partnered up to create the Lead with Love Fund. The fund awards do-gooders in communities around the country with grants to help them continue on with their unique missions. Hundreds of nominations came pouring in and five winners were selected based on three criteria: the impact of action, uniqueness, and "Upworthy-ness" of their story.

Here's a look at the five winners:

Edith Ornelas, co-creator of Mariposas Collective in Memphis, Tenn.

Edith Ornelas has a deep-rooted connection to the asylum-seeking immigrant families she brings food and supplies to families in Memphis, Tenn. She was born in Jalisco, Mexico, and immigrated to the United States when she was 7 years old with her parents and sister. Edith grew up in Chicago, then moved to Memphis in 2016, where she quickly realized how few community programs existed for immigrants. Two years later, she helped create Mariposas Collective, which initially aimed to help families who had just been released from detention centers and were seeking asylum. The collective started out small but has since grown to approximately 400 volunteers.