The 'how it started, how it's going' meme is exactly the uplifting message we needed
Via Phil Martin Jr.

Every goal that's ever been achieved has started with a dream. Whether it's a career, an artistic endeavor or relationship, it all starts with a glimmer of hope, then with some hard work, determination and a little bit luck, we may just find ourselves at the destination.

While it's common for people to attribute mastery of a skill to a gift or natural genius, for most, it's not natural. Their skills are developed through regular practice. In his book, "Outliers," Malcom Gladwell shows that some of the greatest artists and entrepreneurs of our time, including BIll Gates and The Beatles, all honed their craft over 10,000 hours before reaching the top.


Successful people are also known to use visualization techniques to help them reach their goals. By visualizing the end result, such as making a clutch shot or seeing yourself on the front page of a magazine, we can provide ourselves with the determination it takes to get through the struggles along the path to success.

People who've reached their goals on Twitter have been sharing what they looked like starting out versus their current selves to encourage other people to strive for their goals.

The great thing is that the people all have different goals and definitions of success. Success for some may be a happy, fulfilling relationship. For others it may be an athletic achievement or success in business.

Regardless, we all have goals we'd like to reach so it's nice to see how most people who achieve something great started at the bottom.

Phil Martin, Jr. has learned to navigate life with autism spectrum disorder to land his dream job as an Amtrak Conductor. He's also an accomplished photographer.

Mwema dreamed of becoming a pilot as a child. Now, he sits in the cockpit.

Naomi Osaka once dreamed of being a tennis professional. Now, she's been ranked number one the Women's Tennis Association, and is the first Asian player to hold the top ranking in singles.

They were once innocent teenagers, now they've reached ultimate 2020 relationship goals.

Every business starts with one customer.

Lil Nas X started with a dream to be a rapper then followed the Old Town Road to unimaginable success.

Getting the body you want starts with making the decision to change and never letting up.

Simone Biles started gymnastics when she was six. Sixteen years later, she's won a combined total of 30 Olympic and World Championship medals.

In 2017, Gina Martin was assaulted by a man who put a camera up her skirt and took a picture. After learning there was no law against it, she started a campaign to make it illegal. Two years later, upskirting is now illegal in the UK.

In 2016, Katie Taylor dreamed about turning professional as a boxer. Four years later, she is a two-weight world champion and the current undisputed lightweight champion, having held the WBA title since 2017; the IBF title since 2018; and the WBC, WBO, and "Ring" magazine titles since 2019.







Courtesy of Creative Commons
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After years of service as a military nurse in the naval Marine Corps, Los Angeles, California-resident Rhonda Jackson became one of the 37,000 retired veterans in the U.S. who are currently experiencing homelessness — roughly eight percent of the entire homeless population.

"I was living in a one-bedroom apartment with no heat for two years," Jackson said. "The Department of Veterans Affairs was doing everything they could to help but I was not in a good situation."

One day in 2019, Jackson felt a sudden sense of hope for a better living arrangement when she caught wind of the ongoing construction of Veteran's Village in Carson, California — a 51-unit affordable housing development with one, two and three-bedroom apartments and supportive services to residents through a partnership with U.S.VETS.

Her feelings of hope quickly blossomed into a vision for her future when she learned that Veteran's Village was taking applications for residents to move in later that year after construction was complete.

"I was entered into a lottery and I just said to myself, 'Okay, this is going to work out,'" Jackson said. "The next thing I knew, I had won the lottery — in more ways than one."

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via Pexels

A new Gallup poll found a significant increase in the number of Americans who identify as LGBT since the last time it conducted a similar poll in 2017.

The poll found that 5.6% of U.S. adults identify as lesbian, gay, bisexual, or transgender. That's a large increase from the 2017 poll that had the number at 4.5%.

"More than half of LGBT adults (54.6%) identify as bisexual. About a quarter (24.5%) say they are gay, with 11.7% identifying as lesbian and 11.3% as transgender. An additional 3.3% volunteer another non-heterosexual preference or term to describe their sexual orientation, such as queer or same-gender-loving," the poll says.

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Courtesy of Creative Commons
True

After years of service as a military nurse in the naval Marine Corps, Los Angeles, California-resident Rhonda Jackson became one of the 37,000 retired veterans in the U.S. who are currently experiencing homelessness — roughly eight percent of the entire homeless population.

"I was living in a one-bedroom apartment with no heat for two years," Jackson said. "The Department of Veterans Affairs was doing everything they could to help but I was not in a good situation."

One day in 2019, Jackson felt a sudden sense of hope for a better living arrangement when she caught wind of the ongoing construction of Veteran's Village in Carson, California — a 51-unit affordable housing development with one, two and three-bedroom apartments and supportive services to residents through a partnership with U.S.VETS.

Her feelings of hope quickly blossomed into a vision for her future when she learned that Veteran's Village was taking applications for residents to move in later that year after construction was complete.

"I was entered into a lottery and I just said to myself, 'Okay, this is going to work out,'" Jackson said. "The next thing I knew, I had won the lottery — in more ways than one."

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I saw this poster today and I was going to just let it go, but then I kept feeling tugged to say something.

Melanie Cholish/Facebook

While this poster is great to bring attention to the issue of child trafficking, it is a "shocking" picture of a young girl tied up. It has that dark gritty feeling. I picture her in a basement tied to a dripping pipe.

While that sounds awful, it's important to know that trafficking children in the US is not all of that. I can't say it never is—I don't know. What I do know is most young trafficked children aren't sitting in a basement tied up. They have families, and someone—usually in their family—is trafficking them.

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via wakaflockafloccar / TikTok

It's amazing to consider just how quickly the world has changed over the past 11 months. If you were to have told someone in February 2020 that the entire country would be on some form of lockdown, nearly everyone would be wearing a mask, and half a million people were going to die due to a virus, no one would have believed you.

Yet, here we are.

PPE masks were the last thing on Leah Holland of Georgetown, Kentucky's mind on March 4, 2020, when she got a tattoo inspired by the words of a close friend.

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