Family

Meditation can be done by anyone just about anywhere in as little as two minutes a day.

Poor misunderstood meditation. People think it takes forever and is only for monks.

Meditation can be done by anyone just about anywhere in as little as two minutes a day.

Meditation can be done by anyone just about anywhere in as little as two minutes a day.

But why should anyone bother? Because it's really — really — good for you.


Wow. That's a heck of a lot of science.

But wait. There's more.

I'm kind of curious now, but what to I have to do? I don't want to sit on top of a mountain with my eyes closed.

Good news! You don't have to.

There are many types of meditation, but for the most part they fall into one of three buckets: concentration, attending, and open monitoring.

Concentration meditation is great for relaxing when you're actively under stress. This is an incredibly valuable skill to help you manage negative emotions like anger, sadness, or fear. With practice, you get really good at pushing negative emotions out of your head in the moment — even if you're feeling them very intensely. This is the classic meditation where you focus on something specific like your breath, a flame, guided imagery, or a sound.

Mindfulness meditation is great for helping you figure yourself out. Hectic lives lead to hectic minds. Taking a moment to figure out what exactly you're feeling in that moment will help you make better decision for yourself and for others. With practice, you'll be more comfortable experiencing emotions — even intensely negative ones — and be more in control of how those emotions affect your actions. Mindfulness meditation allows you to be introspective and doesn't force you to avoid being distracted by thoughts or sensations.

Attending meditation is somewhere in the middle.

You don't have to pick one and avoid the others. Mix it up and see how they make you feel!

OK, I'm convinced. But I'm still a busy person. I don't have time to meditate every day.


Obviously two minutes isn't going to bring you a direct connection with nirvana. But you can start small. I mean really small. There are lots of great meditation apps available that help you try meditating for tiny chunks of time — 2 minutes, 5 minutes, 10 minutes. Some options are completely free, some are have a one-time fee, some have both free and paid features.

Who knows, maybe you'll love it enough that you *will* end up on top of a mountain.

Courtesy of Movemeant Foundation

True

Have you ever woken up one day and wondered if you were destined to do more in your life? Or worried you didn't take that shot at your dream?

FOX's new show "The Big Leap." is here to show you that all you need to take that second chance is the confidence to do so.

Watch as a group of diverse underdogs from all different walks of life try to change their lives by auditioning for a reality TV dance show, finding themselves on an emotional journey when suddenly thrust into the spotlight. And they're not letting the fact that they don't have the traditional dancer body type, age, or background hold them back.

Unfortunately, far too many people lack this kind of confidence. That's why FOX is partnering with the Movemeant Foundation, an organization whose whole mission is to teach women and girls that fitness and physical movement is essential to helping them develop self-confidence, resilience, and commitment with communities of like-minded girls.

Keep Reading Show less

Those of us raising teenagers now didn't grow up with social media. Heck, the vast majority of us didn't even grow up with the internet. But we know how ubiquitous social media, with all of its psychological pitfalls, has become in our own lives, so it's not a big stretch to imagine the incredible impact it can have on our kids during their most self-conscious phase.

Sharing our lives on social media often means sharing the highlights. That's not bad in and of itself, but when all people are seeing is everyone else's highlight reels, it's easy to fall into unhealthy comparisons. As parents, we need to remind our teens not to do that—but we also need to remind them that other people will do that, which is why kindness, empathy, and inclusiveness are so important.

Writer and mother of three teen daughters, Whitney Fleming, shared a beautiful post on Facebook explaining what we need to teach our teenagers about empathy in the age of social media, and how we ourselves can serve as an example.

Keep Reading Show less