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Little girl's viral pink chair costume finally gets an explanation and it's perfect

"This little lady is going places."

funny videos; pink chair costume; parenting; funny parenting videos; parenting videos

Little girl's viral pink chair costume finally explained

Kids are interesting, especially between the ages of early toddlerhood and first grade. They can literally fall over laughing because you ripping paper is suddenly hilarious or develop a deep connection with a mixing spoon that they insist on taking everywhere. You really never know what they're going to do and as parents we just learn to go with it.

As long as it's not hurting them or anyone else, go for it. For nearly two years my daughter dressed up as Snow White every day, complete with plastic heels, only taking a break for wash days when all three costumes were dirty. So it's not a surprise when one little girl decided she wanted to be a pink chair for Halloween.

Recently, her parents posted a compilation video on their TikTok page, Toy Story Dad, partially captioned, "This is her world and we are all just living in it," giving an explanation on her viral chair costume.


The best part of the explanation is that it didn't need to be explained. They just compiled videos of all of the times they asked their daughter, Scarlet, what she wanted to be for Halloween, likely thinking she would change her mind. But she didn't, in fact, she started to look a bit miffed at them constantly asking. Every time they would ask, the little girl who looks to be about three replies, "a pink chair."

No further explanation is needed. She was a pink chair for Halloween last year simply because she was persistent in her request and she just happened to be the cutest little pink chair out there. Commenters loved her adorable insistence and some included their own interesting costume choices their kids have had.

"The request, the persistence, the delivery, the execution (chef's hand inserted) this little lady is going places," one person writes.

"HER LEGS BEING THE BACK LEGS OF THE CHAIR IS SO CUTE," another commenter writes.

"My friend has twin girls. One was a princess and the other was a crouton as per their requests," someone says.

There were some revelations of unique costume choices in the comments. Kids dressed up as an oven, air conditioner, water bottle and even a recycling bin. Little ones are so creative but so are their parents because I'm going to assume it's unlikely to come across an oven or chair at your local Target. But you can see her adorable costume below:

@toystorydad_

This is her world and we are all just living in it. 💕What is the funniest thing your kid has dressed up as? Or wanted to dress up as?

This article originally appeared on 10.9.23

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