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Larissa Waters' viral breastfeeding photo has an important message about motherhood.

This working mom's fight for a better world gets a boost from her new baby.

Larissa Waters' viral breastfeeding photo has an important message about motherhood.

Think politics is filled with nothing but whining babies? Just wait until you see what's happening in Australia.

Queensland Sen. Larissa Waters just became the first woman to breastfeed on the floor of Australia's parliament. Thanks to a 2016 rule that gave the all-clear for moms to breast- and bottle-feed on the job, Waters made a bit of history when she brought 10-week-old Alia Joy to work this week.

She marked the occasion with a celebratory tweet.


The whole thing might seem kind of silly, but there's actually a really important message here.

"If we want more young women in Parliament, we must make the rules more family friendly to allow new mothers and new fathers to balance their parliamentary and parental duties," Waters said in November.

Worldwide, Waters isn't alone. She joins Icelandic member of parliament Unnur Brá Konráðsdóttir, Spanish politician Carolina Bescansa, and Italian politician and former member of European parliament Licia Ronzulli as mothers in politics who've brought their babies to the job.

Normalizing the act of breastfeeding (really folks, it shouldn't be that big of a deal) by making accommodations for new parents' hectic schedules and fighting for paid parental leave are both part of the fight for the more equal and welcoming world Waters wants. Sadly, some countries don't have paid maternal or paternal leave (most notably the U.S.), and there's still an unfortunate stigma and disgust surrounding breastfeeding (especially in public) that needs to stop.

Waters longs for the day when a mother feeding her child in public or at work isn't news.

"We need family-friendly and flexible workplaces for all so this isn't news anymore," she tweeted ahead of an interview with Sky News.

Announcing Alia's birth in an International Women's Day Facebook post back in March, Waters offered up a sweet note to her new daughter along with a mission statement about her purpose in motherhood and in politics.

What a fitting day to announce the arrival of my second daughter, Alia Joy! She has a head of hair like an 80s pop star...

Posted by Larissa Waters on Tuesday, March 7, 2017

"She is even more inspiration for continuing our work to address gender inequality and stem dangerous climate change. (And yes, if she's hungry, she will be breastfed in the Senate chamber)," she wrote, later adding, "Our public health system is excellent and must be fought for and protected! To all the awesome mums out there juggling everything — you are the real superheroes."

Photo by Louis Hansel on Unsplash
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This story was originally shared on Capital One.

Inside the walls of her kitchen at her childhood home in Guatemala, Evelyn Klohr, the founder of a Washington, D.C.-area bakery called Kakeshionista, was taught a lesson that remains central to her business operations today.

"Baking cakes gave me the confidence to believe in my own brand and now I put my heart into giving my customers something they'll enjoy eating," Klohr said.

While driven to launch her own baking business, pursuing a dream in the culinary arts was economically challenging for Klohr. In the United States, culinary schools can open doors to future careers, but the cost of entry can be upwards of $36,000 a year.

Through a friend, Klohr learned about La Cocina VA, a nonprofit dedicated to providing job training and entrepreneurship development services at a training facility in the Washington, D.C-area.

La Cocina VA's, which translates to "the kitchen" in Spanish, offers its Bilingual Culinary Training program to prepare low-and moderate-income individuals from diverse backgrounds to launch careers in the food industry.

That program gave Klohr the ability to fully immerse herself in the baking industry within a professional kitchen facility and receive training in an array of subjects including culinary skills, food safety, career development and English language classes.

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via Gage Skidmore/Flickr and Terry Morgan/Flickr

Senator Ted Cruz and a kangaroo.

Conservative media in the United States has painted Australia as a state on the brink of authoritarianism due to strict COVID-19 protections in some parts of the country. These news outlets appear to be using the country as an example of what can happen in America if liberal politicians go unchecked.

Fox News' Tucker Carlson ran a story on Australia earlier this month claiming the country "looks a lot like China did at the beginning of the pandemic." He ended it by saying that "what's happening in Australia might be instructive to us in the United States" and that things can "change very quickly" and become "dystopian and autocratic."

Carlson provides zero reasons why Americans should be fearful of becoming an autocratic country due to COVID-19, beyond the idea that "things can change very quickly" so his appeals sound a lot more like fear-mongering than genuine concern.

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When a pet is admitted to a shelter it can be a traumatizing experience. Many are afraid of their new surroundings and are far from comfortable showing off their unique personalities. The problem is that's when many of them have their photos taken to appear in online searches.

Chewy, the pet retailer who has dedicated themselves to supporting shelters and rescues throughout the country, recognized the important work of a couple in Tampa, FL who have been taking professional photos of shelter pets to help get them adopted.

"If it's a photo of a scared animal, most people, subconsciously or even consciously, are going to skip over it," pet photographer Adam Goldberg says. "They can't visualize that dog in their home."

Adam realized the importance of quality shelter photos while working as a social media specialist for the Humane Society of Broward County in Fort Lauderdale, Florida.

"The photos were taken top-down so you couldn't see the size of the pet, and the flash would create these red eyes," he recalls. "Sometimes [volunteers] would shoot the photos through the chain-link fences."

That's why Adam and his wife, Mary, have spent much of their free time over the past five years photographing over 1,200 shelter animals to show off their unique personalities to potential adoptive families. The Goldbergs' wonderful work was recently profiled by Chewy in the video above entitled, "A Day in the Life of a Shelter Pet Photographer."