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Language expert shares what English sounds like to people who don't speak it

You feel like you should understand him but can't.

hyperpolyglot, languagesimp, english

People are really cofused by this strange language.

For English speakers, it can feel impossible to conceive of what the language sounds like to those who don’t speak it. So, to give people an idea of how it’s heard by foreign ears, LanguageSimp, a hyperpolyglot, created a video on TikTok to simulate the experience of what English sounds like to non-speakers.

(A hyperpolyglot is someone who speaks multiple languages.)

The fake Ensligh spoken by LangugeSimp comprises a few English words in non-sensical patterns mixed with familiar sounds that are commonly heard in the language. The strange version of English being spoken sounds a lot like Simlish, the language used by characters in The Sims franchise.


"I’ve said it before and I’ll say it again... He out here speaking in Simlish," Michael Romanazzi wrote in the comments. People with keen ears may notice LanguageSimp uttering a strange phrase: “You’re literally dog water.”

Ever wondered what it’s like to not understand English? 

@languagesimp

Ever wondered what it’s like to not understand English? #english #languages #language #linguistics #USA #polyglot

The video is fun because it gives English-speaking people a unique perspective on their mother tongue. Hopefully, it also makes people a bit more empathetic towards those trying to learn the language.

"It sounds like I should be able to understand, but when I try it makes no sense," DoggoDraagon commented.

The video brought back memories for many who have had to learn English as a second language.

"That’s how it sounded when I first moved to America; no wonder I can’t remember what they were saying to me," Julio added. "As someone who grew up speaking only Spanish in Spain, learning English and understanding it was hard as hell," Mimi commented.

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