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Young boy's wows his parents with an impressive 'financial plan' to invest in his future

Some kids know exactly what they want out of life from the get go. And how to get there.

saving for college, kids tiktok, financial literacy, college plan
@linsfam33/TikTok

This ten-year-old is going places

It’s uncanny how some kids really don’t seem like kids at all.

Instead, they think, speak and behave like adults (just, you know, child-sized adults). There’s an inherent savviness to these old souls that makes them not only aware of what they want out of life, but able to create concrete steps towards that goal…both skills that don’t reach many of us until well into adulthood.

Take for instance Neil Lims, a 10-year-old who is so determined to go to Morris College that he spent an entire Friday evening coming up with an impressive financial plan to save money for tuition.

Neil presented the plan to his parents, Shark Tank style, and thanks to a recording of it blowing up on TikTok, now we can all marvel at this young man’s natural entrepreneurial abilities.


In the clip, Neil unrolls a large sheet of brown paper with math scribbles as he explains how opting out of Christmas and birthday presents could help the family save big.

"I asked mom how much money she spends on my present for my birthday. She said $100. When I'm 19, I'll be moving out. So if I put all that money, $900, then I have to think about Christmas. It's also $100. Nine-hundred dollars plus $900 is 1800,” he said.

Then came the proposal: “So then the price of Morris for two years is $24,000 currently. If... instead of getting presents from you, I just get the money for college, then I'll be 9% of the way there!"

@linsfam33 It was 10:30 on a Friday night. Our youngest had been quiet. So quiet that i thought he had gone to bed. Nope. He was just preparing a finacial presentation for us. 😂 #collegeplan #financialliteracy #fridaynight #kidsarethebest ♬ original sound - n-lins

When Neil’s mother asks if he’s sure that he would like money for college over presents, the boy’s answer is simple and definitive. “I. Care. About. My. Future.” Wow. It’s hard to tell which is more impressive—this kid’s analytical prowess or his resolve. Plus, good on Neil’s mom for mentioning investing at the end of the video. Judging by the way his face lights up when she utters the word, it’s clearly a passion that she’s paying attention to.

After the clip went viral on TikTok, even Morris College saw Neil’s financial plan, and ended up sending him a swag box to encourage to keep pursuing his dreams.

@linsfam33 Replying to @linsfam33 THANK YOU @umnmorris for this awesome box of fun things for the whole family!! Please follow and subscribe to us on youtube and instagram. (Linsfam33) We have a few things in the works that we will be sharing. #viral #financialliteracy #collegeplan #kidsarethebest ♬ original sound - n-lins

And while a small handful of folks shared concern over Neil sacrificing toys (and therefore an aspect of his childhood) in the name of steep college tuition prices, research has shown that it’s perfectly natural and healthy for kids as young as four or five to be able to formulate plans for their future.

In another video, Neil’s mom explained how at the ripe old age of three when he came up with the idea for a candy stand, with the ultimate goal of owning one on every continent—it’s a business Neil still has today. In fact, following his sudden internet fame, Neil’s family started an Indiegogo campaign to help cover startup costs for the business, including website development, business planning, and marketing.

Learning at least the basics of financial literacy—such as savings, controlling impulse buys, and finding creative ways to make money—can be one of the best ways to ensure a kid’s future. Luckily, there are plenty of ways to make this kind of learning fun for children nowadays, so one doesn’t have to be born with Neil’s shrewdness in order to succeed.

But financial prowess aside, it’s always cool to see it when kids are just so sure of themselves and where they want to be. And Neil is no exception.

@lindseyswagmom/TikTok

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