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jimmy fallon justin timberlake golf

Spreading joy and swinging clubs.

There’s BFFs, and then there’s Jimmy Fallon and Justin Timberlake.

Their friendship (of nearly 18 years, by the way) is the stuff of wholesome pop culture legend. From goofy music videos to hilarious SNL sketches, Fallon and Timberlake always appear to take such enthusiastic and genuine joy in one another. Which may or may not make Timberlake’s wife Jessica Biel a tad jealous.

When the duo went out for a few rounds of golf in Las Vegas (according to Today), the two seemed to bring out their inner kids once again.The day consisted of jumping, dancing, chest bumping, shooting hoops (wait, which sport is happening here?), rolling around in the grass, a few sit-ups … oh yeah, and they also golfed, Timberlake assured in the caption of his Instagram post.


Timberlake’s video is set to Leo Sayer’s “You Make Me Feel Like Dancing,” which sums up his relationship with Fallon in a nutshell.

They were also seen applying sunscreen on one another. Because everyone knows that real friends don’t let other friends get sunburnt.

Fallon posted his own video to Instagram, set to Greg Street’s “Good Day.”

Seriously, it looks like a bunch of 6-year-old boys galloping around in a field, not men well into their 40s hangin' out on a golf course. And I mean that in the best way.

Timberlake seemed to be in particularly good form that day, despite the shenanigans. After knocking the ball closest to the hole during the 19th hole shootout, he quickly dropped the mic—or rather, club—and proceeded to show us all how it was no big deal really with a bunch of shrugs.

Ever the loving hype man, Fallon wouldn’t stop cheering his buddy on.


8amgolf, the tournament being held, wrote on its own page “find yourself a partner who knows how to celebrate.”

Though 8amgolf announced football players Travis Kelce and Patrick Mahomes II as the game’s champions of the day, Fallon and Timberlake are clearly the MVPs of bromance. And we love them for it.

May all our friendships be as full of silly, fun and childlike antics as a day of golf with Jimmy and Justin.

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