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Democracy

Jon Stewart just conducted an unforgettable interview with lawmaker peddling election lies

That's how it's done, folks.

Jon Stewart; Arizona AG; 2020 Election; Election Fraud
The Problem With Jon Stewart/YouTube

Jon Stewart is back in the spotlight.

Jon Stewart stepped out of the spotlight to work on a cause he felt passionately about, getting adequate funding for veterans who got sick from burn pits while in combat zones. But last year he took to the desk again for his new show on Apple TV+, "The Problem With Jon Stewart," and this second season is shaping up to be doozy of musical chairs with a new politician in the hot seat every week.

Clips from the rapid-fire interviews are going viral, in part for his oxymoronic signature style of questioning but largely due to his excellent research and fact-checking. This episode with Arizona Attorney General Mark Brnovich is a prime example of his skill when inquiring about election fraud.


When Stewart asks a question, you should probably believe he already knows the answer, and this seems to catch some people off guard. The talk show host's last clip to go viral was of him grilling Arkansa Attorney General Leslie Rutledge about her state's laws that ban gender-affirming care for minors. There were moments that appeared to expose that the guest was not prepared for Stewart to ask such hard and pressing questions but the host persisted.

Stewart has a unique talent for remaining kind, humorous and likable while he steadily applies pressure to whatever adversarial guest sits across from him. The clip of his interview with Brnovich shows Stewart's determination to get to the truth about whether the Attorney General actually believes that the 2020 election was fraudulently given to President Biden. It's like watching a verbal sparring match if words could throw punches or bob and weave.

Stewart repeatedly tries to get Brnovich to answer the question of if he personally believes that there was election fraud in Arizona. Brnovich argues that there are "almost 20 criminal cases related to the 2020 election" to which Stewart quickly counters, "out of 4 million votes." The Republican Attorney General was not deterred and explained that there are "millions of people" throughout the country who think the election was stolen.

Stewart, with his notes in hand, continues to challenge Brnovich, even at one point putting his glasses on to read directly from the paper, pointing out that the former president once said, "74,000 mail-in ballots received that were never mailed, magically appearing ballots. 168,000 fraudulent ballots printed on illegal paper, 36,000 ballots illegally cast by non-citizens." Stewart removes his glasses and continues, "Now, the truth is, none of that was real."

Jon Stewart at USO.

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Brnovich explains his reasoning for investigating the claims but when pushed on if he would come out and say the election was won fairly should his investigation not show evidence of fraud, Brnovich wouldn't commit. Pushing for the attorney general to agree to reveal the facts of his investigation once complete proves to be difficult. At one point during the exchange when Brnovich continues to give long-winded answers to a yes or no question, Stewart says, "This is blowing my mind."

When it comes to information on the 2020 election and recent policies and laws, having facts helps you draw your own conclusions. Jon Stewart is coming in with well-researched facts and asking hard questions to those in charge. The full interview will air on the streaming network Apple TV+.

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From political science to joining the fight against cancer: How one woman found her passion

An unexpected pivot to project management expanded Krystal Brady's idea of what it means to make a positive impact.

Krystal Brady/PMI

Krystal Brady utilizes her project management skills to help advance cancer research and advocacy.

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Cancer impacts nearly everyone’s life in one way or another, and thankfully, we’re learning more about treatment and prevention every day. Individuals and organizations dedicated to fighting cancer and promising research from scientists are often front and center, but we don’t always see the people working behind the scenes to make the fight possible.

People like Krystal Brady.

While studying political science in college, Brady envisioned her future self in public office. She never dreamed she’d build a successful career in the world of oncology, helping cancer researchers, doctors and advocates continue battling cancer, but more efficiently.

Brady’s journey to oncology began with a seasonal job at a small publishing company, which helped pay for college and awakened her love for managing projects. Now, 15 years later, she’s serving as director of digital experience and strategy at the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO), which she describes as “the perfect place to pair my love of project management and desire to make positive change in the world.”

As a project manager, Brady helps make big ideas for the improvement of diagnosing and treating cancer a reality. She is responsible for driving the critical projects that impact the lives of cancer researchers, doctors, and patients.

“I tell people that my job is part toolbox, part glue,” says Brady. “Being a project manager means being responsible for understanding the details of a project, knowing what tools or resources you need to execute the project, and facilitating the flow of that work to the best outcome possible. That means promoting communication, partnership, and ownership among the team for the project.”

At its heart, Brady’s project management work is about helping people. One of the big projects Brady is currently working on is ASCO’s digital transformation, which includes upgrading systems and applications to help streamline and personalize oncologists’ online experience so they can access the right resources more quickly. Whether you are managing humans or machines, there’s an extraordinary need for workers with the skillset to harness new technology and solve problems.

The digital transformation project also includes preparing for the use of emerging technologies such as generative AI to help them in their research and practices.

“Most importantly, it lays the groundwork for us to make a meaningful impact at the point of care, giving the oncologist and patient the absolute latest recommendations or guidelines for care for that specific patient or case, allowing the doctor to spend more time with their patients and less time on paperwork,” Brady says.

In today’s fast-changing, quickly advancing world, project management is perhaps more valuable than ever. After discovering her love for it, Brady earned her Project Management Professional (PMP)® certification through Project Management Institute (PMI)—the premier professional organization for project managers with chapters all over the world—which she says gave her an edge over other candidates when she applied for her job at ASCO.

“The knowledge I gained in preparing for the PMP exam serves me every day in my role,” Brady says. “What I did not expect and have truly come to value is the PMI network as well – finding like-minded individuals, opportunities for continuous learning, and the ability to volunteer and give back.”

PMI’s growing community – including more than 300 chapters globally – serves as a place for project managers and individuals who use project management skills to learn and grow through events, online resources, and certification programs.

While people often think of project management in the context of corporate careers, all industries and organizations need project managers, making it a great career for those who want to elevate our world through non-profits or other service-oriented fields.

“Project management makes a difference by focusing on efficiency and outcomes, making us all a little better at what we do,” says Brady. “In almost every industry, understanding how to do our work more effectively and efficiently means more value to our customers, and the world at large, at an increased pace.”

Project management is also a stable career path in high demand as shown by PMI research, which found that the global economy will need 25 million more project managers by 2030 and that the median salary for project managers in the US has grown to $120K.

If you’d like to learn more about careers in project management, PMI has resources to help you get started or prove your proficiency, including its entry-level Certified Associate in Project Management (CAPM) certification program. For those interested in pursuing a project management career to make a difference, it could be your first step.
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