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The adorable dog from the Betty White Oscars tribute was immediately adopted by John Travolta

betty white, john travolta, pet adoption

John Travolta and Betty White.

The infamous Slap Heard Round the World at the Academy Awards on Sunday night stole all of the event’s headlines but there were some very sweet moments that shouldn’t be overlooked.

The speech by Best Supporting Actor winner Troy Kotsur for his performance in “CODA” was a real tear-jerker. There was also a tribute to Betty White featuring Jamie Lee Curtis, who took the stage with an adorable dog named Mac & Cheese. White was a tireless animal rights advocate who helped countless animals throughout her lifetime.

"Day in and day out for almost a century, she was a woman who cared so much for not just her two-legged friends but for animals just like this," the actor said. "So, the greatest gift you could give Betty White is to open your heart and your home and adopt a rescue dog just like Mac & Cheese from (the nonprofit organization) Paw Works."


Curtis left the theater after the tribute and received a text message with a photo of actor John Travolta holding Mac & Cheese in the green room. “I thought it was so beautiful to see him,” she said of her “Perfect” co-star. Travolta was preparing to hit the stage for a "Pulp Fiction" reunion with Uma Thurman and Samuel L. Jackson.

Evidently, Travolta and Mac & Cheese shared an immediate bond because the next day, Curtis shared a photo of the "Grease" star with the dog along with his 11-year-old son, Ben. After meeting Mac & Cheese at the ceremony, Travolta decided to adopt the pup.

Curtis was overjoyed that Mac & Cheese found a forever home with the Travoltas.

“I thought it was so beautiful to see him with her and then today I found out that he and his son, Ben have adopted beautiful little mac & cheese and are taking her home today. It is an emotional end and a perfect tribute to Betty White,” Curtis wrote on Instagram.

Travolta is clearly an animal lover. His Instagram feed shows that he has two dogs, one of which is a mini pin named Jinx. According to Celebrity Pets, he adopted a cat named Crystal last year. There’s no doubt that Betty White would have been elated to know that she played a role in another dog finding a forever home.

When White passed away on New Year’s Eve last year she left an incredible legacy of caring for animals. She worked for decades championing animal rights, published a book on the subject and starred in the nature show “Pet Set” in 1971.

After her death, she was honored by the ASPCA.

“Betty White demonstrated a lifelong commitment to helping animals in need, including dedicated support for local shelters and animal welfare endeavors, fiercely promoting and protecting animal interests in her entertainment projects, and personally adopting many rescued animals,” Matt Bershadker, ASPCA president and CEO, said in a statement.

Thank you for being a friend, Betty.

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