betty white, john travolta, pet adoption

John Travolta and Betty White.

The infamous Slap Heard Round the World at the Academy Awards on Sunday night stole all of the event’s headlines but there were some very sweet moments that shouldn’t be overlooked.

The speech by Best Supporting Actor winner Troy Kotsur for his performance in “CODA” was a real tear-jerker. There was also a tribute to Betty White featuring Jamie Lee Curtis, who took the stage with an adorable dog named Mac & Cheese. White was a tireless animal rights advocate who helped countless animals throughout her lifetime.

"Day in and day out for almost a century, she was a woman who cared so much for not just her two-legged friends but for animals just like this," the actor said. "So, the greatest gift you could give Betty White is to open your heart and your home and adopt a rescue dog just like Mac & Cheese from (the nonprofit organization) Paw Works."


Curtis left the theater after the tribute and received a text message with a photo of actor John Travolta holding Mac & Cheese in the green room. “I thought it was so beautiful to see him,” she said of her “Perfect” co-star. Travolta was preparing to hit the stage for a "Pulp Fiction" reunion with Uma Thurman and Samuel L. Jackson.

Evidently, Travolta and Mac & Cheese shared an immediate bond because the next day, Curtis shared a photo of the "Grease" star with the dog along with his 11-year-old son, Ben. After meeting Mac & Cheese at the ceremony, Travolta decided to adopt the pup.

Curtis was overjoyed that Mac & Cheese found a forever home with the Travoltas.

“I thought it was so beautiful to see him with her and then today I found out that he and his son, Ben have adopted beautiful little mac & cheese and are taking her home today. It is an emotional end and a perfect tribute to Betty White,” Curtis wrote on Instagram.

Travolta is clearly an animal lover. His Instagram feed shows that he has two dogs, one of which is a mini pin named Jinx. According to Celebrity Pets, he adopted a cat named Crystal last year. There’s no doubt that Betty White would have been elated to know that she played a role in another dog finding a forever home.

When White passed away on New Year’s Eve last year she left an incredible legacy of caring for animals. She worked for decades championing animal rights, published a book on the subject and starred in the nature show “Pet Set” in 1971.

After her death, she was honored by the ASPCA.

“Betty White demonstrated a lifelong commitment to helping animals in need, including dedicated support for local shelters and animal welfare endeavors, fiercely promoting and protecting animal interests in her entertainment projects, and personally adopting many rescued animals,” Matt Bershadker, ASPCA president and CEO, said in a statement.

Thank you for being a friend, Betty.

Joy

Meet Eva, the hero dog who risked her life saving her owner from a mountain lion

Wilson had been walking down a path with Eva when a mountain lion suddenly appeared.

Photo by Didssph on Unsplash

A sweet face and fierce loyalty: Belgian Malinois defends owner.

The Belgian Malinois is a special breed of dog. It's highly intelligent, extremely athletic and needs a ton of interaction. While these attributes make the Belgian Malinois the perfect dog for police and military work, they can be a bit of a handful as a typical pet.

As Belgian Malinois owner Erin Wilson jokingly told NPR, they’re basically "a German shepherd on steroids or crack or cocaine.”

It was her Malinois Eva’s natural drive, however, that ended up saving Wilson’s life.

According to a news release from the California Department of Fish and Wildlife, Wilson had been walking down a path with Eva slightly ahead of her when a mountain lion suddenly appeared and swiped Wilson across the left shoulder. She quickly yelled Eva’s name and the dog’s instincts kicked in immediately. Eva rushed in to defend her owner.

It wasn’t long, though, before the mountain lion won the upper hand, much to Wilson’s horror.

She told TODAY, “They fought for a couple seconds, and then I heard her start crying. That’s when the cat latched on to her skull.”

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Joy

50-years ago they trade a grilled cheese for a painting. Now it's worth a small fortune.

Irene and Tony Demas regularly traded food at their restaurant in exchange for crafts. It paid off big time.

Photo by Gio Bartlett on Unsplash

Painting traded for grilled cheese worth thousands.

The grilled cheese at Irene and Tony Demas’ restaurant was truly something special. The combination of freshly baked artisan bread and 5-year-old cheddar was enough to make anyone’s mouth water, but no one was nearly as devoted to the item as the restaurant’s regular, John Kinnear.

Kinnear loved the London, Ontario restaurant's grilled cheese so much that he ordered it every single day, though he wouldn’t always pay for it in cash. The Demases were well known for bartering their food in exchange for odds and ends from local craftspeople and merchants.

“Everyone supported everyone back then,” Irene told the Guardian, saying that the couple would often trade free soup and a sandwich for fresh flowers. Two different kinds of nourishment, you might say.

And so, in the 1970s the Demases made a deal with Kinnear that he could pay them for his grilled cheese sandwiches with artwork. Being a painter himself and part of an art community, Kinnear would never run out of that currency.

Little did Kinnear—or anyone—know, eventually he would give the Demases a painting worth an entire lifetime's supply of grilled cheeses. And then some.

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Sandy Hook school shooting survivors are growing up and telling us what they've experienced.

This story originally appeared on 12.15.21


Imagine being 6 years old, sitting in your classroom in an idyllic small town, when you start hearing gunshots. Your teacher tries to sound calm, but you hear the fear in her voice as she tells you to go hide in your cubby. She says, "be quiet as a mouse," but the sobs of your classmates ring in your ears. In four minutes, you hear more than 150 gunshots.

You're in the first grade. You wholeheartedly believe in Santa Claus and magic. You're excited about losing your front teeth. Your parents still prescreen PG-rated films so they can prepare you for things that might be scary in them.

And yet here you are, living through a horror few can fathom.

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