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Jimmy Kimmel's emotional monologue on gun violence is a must-watch.

Turns out that not doing anything hasn't worked very well.

Jimmy Kimmel's emotional monologue on gun violence is a must-watch.

After the October 2017 shooting in Las Vegas that left concertgoers dead, Jimmy Kimmel devoted his monologue to the topic of gun violence. After this week's massacre in Parkland, Florida, he did it again.

The first time around, Kimmel peppered his monologue with stats, ideas, and arguments — almost all of which could be recycled for our current response — but this time, he decided to take a simpler approach, asking simply that lawmakers do "something." For many members of Congress, that may still be asking for too much.

He opened his Feb. 14 monologue with a nod to Trump's response to the shooting — not so much what Trump said, but what he didn't say.

Trump's live address to the nation on Feb. 15 was widely panned for its lack of any substantial policy suggestions. In fact, throughout the speech, he made zero mention of guns at all, instead making a few passing references to Scripture and suggesting that the root of our country's gun violence problem is mental health — not a good look, given that he struck down an Obama-era regulation restricting gun access to those with mental health issues.


It was an empty shell of the type of speech we've come to expect from our leaders, and that's why it's crucial that people with large platforms like Jimmy Kimmel use them to say what our president won't: It's time for action.

"What we need are laws — real laws — that do everything possible to keep assault rifles out of the hands of people who are going to shoot our kids," Kimmel said with tears beginning to well.

GIFs from "Jimmy Kimmel Live"/YouTube.

He went on to slam politicians who insist, time after time, that we can't "politicize" these tragedies or that it's always somehow "too soon" to have a tough conversation.

"Don’t you dare let anyone say it’s too soon to be talking about this. Because you said it after Vegas, you said it after Sandy Hook, you say that after every one of these eight fatal school shootings we had in this country this year," he pleaded.

"Children are being murdered," he said, choking up. "We still haven’t even talked about it. You still haven’t done anything about this. Nothing. You’ve literally done nothing."

There are a lot of simple, common sense gun safety measures supported across the political spectrum, so why won't Congress act?

According to a 2017 report published by The New York Times, with data sourced from the Law Center to Prevent Gun Violence, some of the most effective solutions — such as reinstating the assault weapons ban (which expired in 2004), a ban on sales to violent criminals, and universal background checks — are also some of the most widely-supported (67%, 85%, and 89%, respectively).

It shouldn't be controversial to enact simple, effective laws. Our members of Congress simply choose not to carry out the will of their constituents and often take a fatalistic approach to the issue by suggesting there's no point in making it harder for people to access guns since they'll find a way to get one anyway

Democrat, Republican, Independent, or "other," Kimmel's exactly right: Now is the time to call on our politicians to stop ignoring the problem and do something.

True

When a pet is admitted to a shelter it can be a traumatizing experience. Many are afraid of their new surroundings and are far from comfortable showing off their unique personalities. The problem is that's when many of them have their photos taken to appear in online searches.

Chewy, the pet retailer who has dedicated themselves to supporting shelters and rescues throughout the country, recognized the important work of a couple in Tampa, FL who have been taking professional photos of shelter pets to help get them adopted.

"If it's a photo of a scared animal, most people, subconsciously or even consciously, are going to skip over it," pet photographer Adam Goldberg says. "They can't visualize that dog in their home."

Adam realized the importance of quality shelter photos while working as a social media specialist for the Humane Society of Broward County in Fort Lauderdale, Florida.

"The photos were taken top-down so you couldn't see the size of the pet, and the flash would create these red eyes," he recalls. "Sometimes [volunteers] would shoot the photos through the chain-link fences."

That's why Adam and his wife, Mary, have spent much of their free time over the past five years photographing over 1,200 shelter animals to show off their unique personalities to potential adoptive families. The Goldbergs' wonderful work was recently profiled by Chewy in the video above entitled, "A Day in the Life of a Shelter Pet Photographer."

This article originally appeared on 12.02.19


Just imagine being an 11-year-old boy who's been shuffled through the foster care system. No forever home. No forever family. No idea where you'll be living or who will take care of you in the near future.

Then, a loving couple takes you under their care and chooses to love you forever.

What could one be more thankful for?

That's why when a fifth grader at Deerfield Elementary School in Cedar Hills, Utah was asked by his substitute teacher what he's thankful for this Thanksgiving, he said finally being adopted by his two dads.

via OD Action / Twitter

To the child's shock, the teacher replied, "that's nothing to be thankful for," and then went on a rant in front of 30 students saying that "two men living together is a sin" and "homosexuality is wrong."

While the boy sat there embarrassed, three girls in the class stood up for him by walking out of the room to tell the principal. Shortly after, the substitute was then escorted out of the building.

While on her way out she scolded the boy, saying it was his fault she was removed.

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One of the boy's parents-to-be is Louis van Amstel, is a former dancer on ABC's "Dancing with the Stars." "It's absolutely ridiculous and horrible what she did," he told The Salt Lake Tribune. "We were livid. It's 2019 and this is a public school."

The boy told his parents-to-be he didn't speak up in the classroom because their final adoption hearing is December 19 and he didn't want to do anything that would interfere.

He had already been through two failed adoptions and didn't want it to happen again.

via Loren Javier / Flickr

A spokesperson for the Alpine School District didn't go into detail about the situation but praised the students who spoke out.

"Fellow students saw a need, and they were able to offer support," David Stephenson said. "It's awesome what happened as far as those girls coming forward."

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He also said that "appropriate action has been taken" with the substitute teacher.

"We are concerned about any reports of inappropriate behavior and take these matters very seriously," Kelly Services, the school the contracts out substitute teachers for the district, said in a statement. "We conduct business based on the highest standards of integrity, quality, and professional excellence. We're looking into this situation."

After the incident made the news, the soon-to-be adoptive parents' home was covered in paper hearts that said, "We love you" and "We support you."

Religion is supposed to make us better people.

But what have here is clearly a situation where a woman's judgement about what is good and right was clouded by bigoted dogma. She was more bothered by the idea of two men loving each other than the act of pure love they committed when choosing to adopt a child.