Jennifer Lawrence will make more money than Chris Pratt in their new movie. That's huge.

Remember back in the olden days when we thought women in the workplace were less valuable than men?

LOL.


GIF from "Mad Men."

Oh wait...

Women are still getting paid less than men. Even today.

About 22 cents less for every dollar to be precise. For the most part, the discrepancy exists across all industries that we have adequate data to pull from. That includes Hollywood.

Top-earning stars who are male earn (way, way) more than their female counterparts.

Forbes crunched the numbers back in 2013 after its annual lists of highest paid actors and actresses were released. While it's not particularly surprising that the men out-earned the women (which is sad in and of itself), it is surprising to learn by how much: The men earned nearly 2.5 times more than the women.

Pretty shocking, huh? Probably not to Jennifer Lawrence.

She's experienced the absurdity of pay inequity firsthand.

After hacked Sony emails went public in 2014, the world got a sneak peek into how execs compensated Lawrence in comparison to her co-stars for their roles in "American Hustle." And it wasn't pretty.

Photo by Mike Coppola/Getty Images.

Based on those emails, despite her having just won an Oscar for "Silver Linings Playbook" and starring in a "Hunger Games" film that set blockbuster records, Lawrence — and co-star Amy Adams — got paid about 23% less than leading men in the movie.

GIF from "Silver Linings Playbook."

But now we have reason to believe that Hollywood maybe — just maybe! — learned its lesson with Lawrence.

Lawrence's latest paycheck isn't just more on par with her male peer's ... it's on par and then some.

According to The Hollywood Reporter, Sony just gave the go-ahead for production on the sci-fi romantic drama, "Passengers," starring Lawrence and fellow industry heavyweight (and dinosaur-fighting) Chris Pratt.

The film's massive budget will reportedly include $20 million for Lawrence and $12 million for Pratt. Yep, you read that correctly: Lawrence — a woman! — will be making $8 million more than Pratt — a man! — on the film.

Jennifer Lawrence photo by Frazer Harrison/Getty Images. Chris Pratt photo by Dimitrios Kambouris/Getty Images.

We love you, Chris. But this is big news. And it comes during a fantastic time for people who like seeing women on the big screen.

If box office results mean anything, things are getting better for Hollywood's leading ladies.

Have you been following which flicks are reigning supreme this summer? Leading ladies are killing it. I mean, where to begin?

There's "Pitch Perfect 2," which brought in more money during its opening weekend than its predecessor made in total. Then there's "Mad Max: Fury Road," which starred Charlize Theron and incorporated feminist story lines into its action-packed plot.

The animated "Inside Out," championed by Amy Poehler (and featuring a truly winning performance by Phyllis Smith as Sadness), had the biggest opening weekend for a non-franchise movie (ever!), and "Spy," starring Melissa McCarthy, is among the top-grossing domestic films of 2015 thus far.

Speaking of Melissa McCarthy, is anyone else stoked about the new "Ghostbusters"?! She's just one of the film's four — four — female leads. Flicks like "Ghostbusters" don't just break down barriers symbolically — they bring more opportunities (and paychecks) to talented women who deserve the spotlight.

Photo by Neilson Barnard/Getty Images.

We admit it: Jennifer Lawrence's big payday won't revolutionize the industry by itself...

...but it's one $20-million step in the right direction for gender equality.

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This year more than ever, many families are anticipating an empty dinner table. Shawn Kaplan lived this experience when his father passed away, leaving his mother who struggled to provide food for her two children. Shawn is now a dedicated volunteer and donor with Second Harvest Food Bank in Middle Tennessee and encourages everyone to give back this holiday season with Amazon.

Watch the full story:

Over one million people in Tennessee are at risk of hunger every day. And since the outbreak of COVID-19, Second Harvest has seen a 50% increase in need for their services. That's why Amazon is Delivering Smiles and giving back this holiday season by fulfilling hundreds of AmazonSmile Charity Lists, donating essential pantry and food items to help organizations like Second Harvest to feed those hit the hardest this year.

Visit AmazonSmile Charity Lists to donate directly to a local food bank or charity in your community, or simply shop smile.amazon.com and Amazon will donate a portion of the purchase price of eligible products to your selected charity.

Acts of kindness and compassion are always inspiring. A veterinarian gave a different spin on the phrase "if you can't beat 'em, join 'em".

The poor little pup in this video walked into this shelter with a history of being abused. He was so traumatized that he wasn't eating. The vet treating him wasn't sure what to do, so he decided to book a table for two: a the dog's place. It is not clear whether he got an official invite from the canine in question, but he felt pretty safe about showing up unannounced. He walked into the cage and sat down next to the dog. With his back up against the corner of his new (and hopefully temporary) domain, the rescue stared apprehensively at his human guest. The vet presented a dog dish with food and put it in front of the dog. The frightened pup just looked at the dish and made no attempt to eat. Then he broke out another dog dish identical to the one he just gave to his four-legged patient and started eating out of that bowl. And then came the turning point.


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A lot of people here are like family to me," Michelle says about Bread for the City — a community nonprofit located in Washington DC that provides local residents with food, clothing, health care, social advocacy, and legal services. And since the pandemic began, the need to support organizations like Bread for the City is greater than ever, which is why Amazon is Delivering Smiles to local charities across the country this holiday season.

Watch the full story:

Amazon is giving back by fulfilling hundreds of AmazonSmile Charity Lists, and donating essential pantry and food items to help organizations like Bread for the City provide to those disproportionately impacted this year.

Visit AmazonSmile Charity Lists to donate directly to a local charity in your community, or simply shop smile.amazon.com and Amazon will donate a portion of the purchase price of eligible products to your charity of choice.

The world has come a long way in the past few decades when it comes to acceptance of people in the LGBTQ+ community. Those of us who grew up in pre-millennial generations remember a very different time, when hiding one's sexual orientation or identity was the norm, homophobic jokes barely batted an eye, and seeing someone living an "out and proud" life was far less common than it is today.

That was the world Dan Levy grew up in. The Schitt's Creek actor and co-creator was born in 1983, and on the day of the series finale of Schitt's Creek, his mom Deborah Divine shared a tweet that perfectly encapsulates not only the changes we've seen in society since then, but the impact Levy himself has had on that world.

She wrote:

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Do you know that guy who has never had an issue with his TV/internet provider? Neither do I. If you claim you have never had issues with your bill going up without warning, then you are either lying or you own the cable company. Jake Lawson apparently does not own a cable company, and was prepared to communicate his frustrations regarding his bill in a most creative way.

First off, Jake understands what everyone should realize. The customer service representative doesn't own the cable company either, so yelling at someone who is just trying to make a living like all of us is not the answer. Their job is hard enough as it is so give them a break. Jake gave them more than a break. He gave them a song.


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