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Pop Culture

Jennifer Garner calls her senator about gun safety all while making brownie oats

Jennifer Garner is the queen of wholesome advocacy. Long may she reign.

jennifer garner pretend baking show, jennifer garner brownie oats recipe

People love her Pretend Cooking Show on Instagram.

Jennifer Garner often serves up sweetness with her beloved Pretend Cooking Show on Instagram. But this time, she’s added her own special dash of simple activism into the mix.

The episode begins with all the playful, adorkable charm we’ve come to expect from Garner.

"You know when you need to be living life, but your heart isn't ready? Sometimes you just need a little comfort-something," the actress-slash-baker says in the opening as she prepares a brownie baked oatmeal recipe from Danielle Brown (@healthygirlkitchen).

"Like, I have on a dress and thought I was being fancy, but then I put sweatpants under it. So, pardon me," she quips while lifting up her skirt. This happens right before she realizes that “oh, shipoopi,” she needs more peanut butter. Yes, she used “shipoopi.” She’s delightful.

Once the ingredients are mixed and the 6 x 9 inch tray goes into the oven, there’s nothing left to do but wait for 40 minutes. Or as Garner puts it, “the perfect amount of time to make a call in support of gun safety bills.” Talk about multitasking.


As Garner talks on the phone, a script provided by journalist and former CNN Chief White House Correspondent Jessica Yellin shows up on the screen, which reads:

"Hello, I'm a constituent. I'd like to let the Senator know it is important to me that s/he votes for the gun safety reforms coming before Congress. You can then say why that matters to you, if you like.”

On her Instagram page, Yellin has also provided the U.S. Senate switchboard number: (202) 224-3121, along with specific GOP senators open to a compromise gun safety bill. You can also find your state senator's direct number at senate.gov.

Yellin’s post adds, “I don’t typically post content that advocates a specific action or guides you to lobby Congress,” but contends that “gun safety reform…is not a blue versus red issue. It’s a ‘get the people’s voices heard’ issue.”

Garner ends her video displaying what looks like a truly decadent dish, which seems to pass her taste test.

“In case you need a little comfort,” she says with a smile. Voila, delicious brownie oatmeal with a side of social justice. All part of a balanced breakfast.

One of Garner’s many, many lovely attributes is her penchant for easy acts of kindness. From making cookies for frontline workers to packing essentials in Ziploc bags for those in need, she shares ideas that practically anyone could do, celebrity or not. And—despite her own superstar status—she does it while staying down to earth. That’s almost as tricky a feat as baking the perfect brownie. But she nails it, and we love her for it.

It doesn’t take an A-lister to make a positive impact, but it's great when they use their celebrity for good. Sometimes big changes happen with small, even (brownie) bite-sized actions.

Marlon Brando and Sacheen Littlefeather.

Nearly 50 years after Sacheen Littlefeather endured boos and abusive jokes at the Academy Awards, the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences is issuing a formal apology. In 1973, Littlefeather refused Marlon Brando's Best Actor Oscar on his behalf for his iconic role in “The Godfather” at the ceremony to protest the film industry’s treatment of Native Americans.

She explained that Brando "very regretfully cannot accept this very generous award, the reasons for this being … the treatment of American Indians today by the film industry and on television in movie reruns, and also with recent happenings at Wounded Knee."

Littlefeather is a Native American civil rights activist who was born to a Native American (Apache and Yaqui) father and a European American mother.

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Researchers from Stanford found that babies prefer to be spoken to in baby talk or “parentese” as scientists refer to the sing-songy cooing we do when talking to infants.

“Often parents are discouraged from using baby talk by well-meaning friends or even health professionals,” Michael Frank, a Stanford psychologist, told Stanford News. “But the evidence suggests that it’s actually a great way to engage with your baby because babies just like it–it tells them, ‘This speech is meant for you!’”

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