How people are making their voices heard in the fight against gun violence.

Orange is loud, and that's exactly why it's the color of choice for commemorating National Gun Violence Awareness Day.


Image via Everytown for Gun Safety/YouTube.


In the United States, a discussion about gun violence is a noisy one. With shootings happening on an all-too-frequent basis, it's sometimes hard for regular people to be heard over lobbyists and politicians when it comes to finding a solution.

Orange is also significant because it's the color hunters wear to warn others not to shoot. In that sense, orange is a symbol of gun safety.

The idea to wear orange originated with the classmates of Hadiya Pendleton, a 15-year-old girl shot to death in Chicago in 2013.

In 2015, Hadiya's friends teamed up with Everytown for Gun Safety to send a message. That message: It's time to take gun violence seriously. No one else should die the way Hadiya did.

Image via Everytown for Gun Safety/YouTube.

The movement has earned the attention of celebrities and public figures around the country.

Celebrities like Julianne Moore...

Image via Everytown for Gun Safety/YouTube.

...Spike Lee and Al Sharpton...


Image via Everytown for Gun Safety/YouTube.

...Ron Howard...


...the Empire State Building even got in on the action...

...and President Obama offered his support.

But you don't need to be famous to take a stand against gun violence. The core goal of the movement is to get regular everyday people involved.

It's about using our voices to usher in change. It's about promoting gun safety.


Image via Everytown for Gun Safety/YouTube.

"The number one way to prevent gun violence is to include a criminal background check on every gun sale," Lucy McBath, faith and outreach leader for Everytown for Gun Safety tells Upworthy.

"We have to close the loopholes in our laws that make it easy for felons, domestic abusers, and other dangerous people to buy guns without a background check. I'd encourage everyone who wants to get involved to join Everytown and their local Moms Demand Action chapter and talk to their legislators about enacting responsible gun laws."


Image via Everytown for Gun Safety/YouTube.

The recent shooting on the UCLA campus serves as a reminder that gun violence can happen anywhere, and it's important to act before it's too late.

"[The UCLA shooting] shows that gun violence affects all of us and can happen anywhere," says McBath, whose son Jordan Davis was shot and killed in 2012.

"Yesterday's tragic events make the June 2 Wear Orange message even more important," she says. "Don't wait until it's your loved one or your community — more than 90 Americans are shot and killed every day and it's time we all come together to say we can do better — there is so much more we can do to prevent gun violence."

Los Angeles Police Department officers respond to the June 1, 2016, shooting on UCLA's campus. Photo by Robyn Beck/AFP/Getty Images.

Learn more about how you can help bring an end to gun violence at WearOrange.com, and watch the video below from Everytown for Gun Safety for additional information.


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When a pet is admitted to a shelter it can be a traumatizing experience. Many are afraid of their new surroundings and are far from comfortable showing off their unique personalities. The problem is that's when many of them have their photos taken to appear in online searches.

Chewy, the pet retailer who has dedicated themselves to supporting shelters and rescues throughout the country, recognized the important work of a couple in Tampa, FL who have been taking professional photos of shelter pets to help get them adopted.

"If it's a photo of a scared animal, most people, subconsciously or even consciously, are going to skip over it," pet photographer Adam Goldberg says. "They can't visualize that dog in their home."

Adam realized the importance of quality shelter photos while working as a social media specialist for the Humane Society of Broward County in Fort Lauderdale, Florida.

"The photos were taken top-down so you couldn't see the size of the pet, and the flash would create these red eyes," he recalls. "Sometimes [volunteers] would shoot the photos through the chain-link fences."

That's why Adam and his wife, Mary, have spent much of their free time over the past five years photographing over 1,200 shelter animals to show off their unique personalities to potential adoptive families. The Goldbergs' wonderful work was recently profiled by Chewy in the video above entitled, "A Day in the Life of a Shelter Pet Photographer."

Vanna White appeared on "The Price Is Right" in 1980.

Vanna White has been a household name in the United States for decades, which is kind of hilarious when you consider how she gained her fame and fortune. Since 1982, the former model and actress has made millions walking back and forth turning letters (and later simply touching them—yay technology) on the game show "Wheel of Fortune."

That's it. Walking back and forth in a pretty evening gown, flipping letters and clapping for contestants. More on that job in a minute…

As a member of Gen X, television game shows like "Wheel of Fortune" and "The Price is Right" send me straight back to my childhood. Watching this clip from 1980 of Vanna White competing on "The Price is Right" two years before she started turning letters on "Wheel of Fortune" is like stepping into a time machine. Bob Barker's voice, the theme music, the sound effects—I swear I'm home from school sick, lying on the ugly flowered couch with my mom checking my forehead and bringing me Tang.

This video has it all: the early '80s hairstyles, a fresh-faced Vanna White and Bob Barker's casual sexism that would never in a million years fly today.

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