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Here's what happens when a group of Jews and Muslims gathered for the most basic gesture of faith.

What they're doing is common. How they're doing it is exceptional.

Here's what happens when a group of Jews and Muslims gathered for the most basic gesture of faith.

A group of people gathered before sunrise on a beach in Los Angeles. They laid blankets and rugs on the sand, and with the tumble of the ocean at their backs, they joined together to begin a familiar ritual: prayer.

But this wasn't just any prayer group. The small and faithful bunch included both Muslims and Jews. And this was the first of five stops on a citywide "prayer crawl." In the video of this epic gathering, they describe why they came together and what they hoped to accomplish. Take a look:

What was so significant about Muslims and Jews praying together?

For starters, group prayer usually only involves people of the same faith. Then there's the who. This gathering confronts the specific, pervasive narrative of Muslims and Jews not getting along, revealing the possibilities beyond just "getting along" in the process. When these prayer participants were in it for the first time, they found deeper meaning in the experience than they could have imagined.


All images via NewGround: A Muslim-Jewish Partnership for Change.

They felt they were a part of something bigger than their own faiths.

They were challenged in unexpected and transformative ways.

"Allahu Akbar" means "god is great," which — surprise — a lot of people believe. Even non-Muslims.

There were "aha" moments.

Some even found what's been missing from their own prayer.

But this wasn't just about bettering themselves. It was about building community to better the world. It was about spreading a message of peace.

And clearly their message resonated with more than that small cohort on the beach.

Just as they hoped, the group grew as the day went on.

And under the glow of the moon, they concluded their prayer expedition with, well, a prayer:

"Grant us courage to walk this righteous path, praying side-by-side and yearning together for peace."

Interfaith alliances aren't anything new, but to see followers of different faiths practicing together is kind of revolutionary.

What if every person of faith were to do the same? How might the world be different? Would it be kinder and capable of more than basic tolerance? Because that's a future worth praying (and fighting) for.

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When a pet is admitted to a shelter it can be a traumatizing experience. Many are afraid of their new surroundings and are far from comfortable showing off their unique personalities. The problem is that's when many of them have their photos taken to appear in online searches.

Chewy, the pet retailer who has dedicated themselves to supporting shelters and rescues throughout the country, recognized the important work of a couple in Tampa, FL who have been taking professional photos of shelter pets to help get them adopted.

"If it's a photo of a scared animal, most people, subconsciously or even consciously, are going to skip over it," pet photographer Adam Goldberg says. "They can't visualize that dog in their home."

Adam realized the importance of quality shelter photos while working as a social media specialist for the Humane Society of Broward County in Fort Lauderdale, Florida.

"The photos were taken top-down so you couldn't see the size of the pet, and the flash would create these red eyes," he recalls. "Sometimes [volunteers] would shoot the photos through the chain-link fences."

That's why Adam and his wife, Mary, have spent much of their free time over the past five years photographing over 1,200 shelter animals to show off their unique personalities to potential adoptive families. The Goldbergs' wonderful work was recently profiled by Chewy in the video above entitled, "A Day in the Life of a Shelter Pet Photographer."

Vanna White appeared on "The Price Is Right" in 1980.

Vanna White has been a household name in the United States for decades, which is kind of hilarious when you consider how she gained her fame and fortune. Since 1982, the former model and actress has made millions walking back and forth turning letters (and later simply touching them—yay technology) on the game show "Wheel of Fortune."

That's it. Walking back and forth in a pretty evening gown, flipping letters and clapping for contestants. More on that job in a minute…

As a member of Gen X, television game shows like "Wheel of Fortune" and "The Price is Right" send me straight back to my childhood. Watching this clip from 1980 of Vanna White competing on "The Price is Right" two years before she started turning letters on "Wheel of Fortune" is like stepping into a time machine. Bob Barker's voice, the theme music, the sound effects—I swear I'm home from school sick, lying on the ugly flowered couch with my mom checking my forehead and bringing me Tang.

This video has it all: the early '80s hairstyles, a fresh-faced Vanna White and Bob Barker's casual sexism that would never in a million years fly today.

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