Heroes

Here are the powerful final minutes of the stunning documentary that's going viral in China.

For millions of people in China, terrible air pollution is a fact of life. Many people simply take it as a given. Journalist Chai Jing used to be one of them.

Here are the powerful final minutes of the stunning documentary that's going viral in China.

Until her unborn daughter was diagnosed with a tumor.

While Chai's daughter ultimately underwent a successful surgery to remove the tumor, she started questioning things she previously took for granted.


Like the meat smell that constantly rose up from the restaurant underneath her apartment.

Chai always figured that the restaurant didn't have the technology to filter its emissions in the same way that restaurants in countries like the U.S. and the U.K. did. But as it turns out, that wasn't true at all.

Soon, other things began occurring to her. Like the stench of gasoline from the service station on her street.

Once again, she always assumed there was nothing that could be done about the fumes. Once again, she was wrong.

Which led her to this conclusion...


...which lead to a revelation...


...which inspired her to make this stunning film.

You can watch the final eight minutes of the documentary below, with exclusive English subtitles. For more on the story behind the film and how it came to blow up the Internet in China, my colleague Mike Su posted this fantastic explainer, along with the first 10 minutes translated into English.

You can read Upworthy's exclusive, original translated summary of the full documentary here.

True

If the past year has taught us nothing else, it's that sending love out into the world through selfless acts of kindness can have a positive ripple effect on people and communities. People all over the United States seemed to have gotten the message — 71% of those surveyed by the World Giving Index helped a stranger in need in 2020. A nonprofit survey found 90% helped others by running errands, calling, texting and sending care packages. Many people needed a boost last year in one way or another and obliging good neighbors heeded the call over and over again — and continue to make a positive impact through their actions in this new year.

Upworthy and P&G Good Everyday wanted to help keep kindness going strong, so they partnered up to create the Lead with Love Fund. The fund awards do-gooders in communities around the country with grants to help them continue on with their unique missions. Hundreds of nominations came pouring in and five winners were selected based on three criteria: the impact of action, uniqueness, and "Upworthy-ness" of their story.

Here's a look at the five winners:

Edith Ornelas, co-creator of Mariposas Collective in Memphis, Tenn.

Edith Ornelas has a deep-rooted connection to the asylum-seeking immigrant families she brings food and supplies to families in Memphis, Tenn. She was born in Jalisco, Mexico, and immigrated to the United States when she was 7 years old with her parents and sister. Edith grew up in Chicago, then moved to Memphis in 2016, where she quickly realized how few community programs existed for immigrants. Two years later, she helped create Mariposas Collective, which initially aimed to help families who had just been released from detention centers and were seeking asylum. The collective started out small but has since grown to approximately 400 volunteers.