+
Fun-loving NFL player Marquette King brought people together to clean up Phoenix with 1 tweet
360_NGBlog / Twitter

After a night of peaceful protests in Downtown Phoenix turned destructive on Saturday night, pro-football punter Marquette King brought people together to clean up the mess the next morning.

King is best known as an All-Pro punter for the then-Oakland Raiders from 2012 to 2017. He briefly played for the Denver Broncos in 2018 and most recently kicked for the XFL's St. Louis Battlehawks.

On Sunday morning, King sent out a tweet asking for people to join him helping to clean up the city.

"Since I'm a resident of AZ I'm gonna be in Downtown Phoenix around 10ish with gloves and trash bags cleaning up the city," King tweeted. "All races are welcome to come clean the city with me. Officers should come too."



Over a dozen people showed up to clean up graffiti and broken glass in the downtown area.


Twittertwitter.com

Some of the people who turned up to help were friends with King, like former ASU quarterback Robert Newslon, Jr. Some had never heard of King, but just wanted to help.

"So I just went on Twitter and I found 'Phoenix cleanup' and I search for that and I saw Marquette's post and I didn't know who he was," another said.

King saw the cleanup as an opportunity to bring people together. "It's a lot of division and I'm all about peace and love and that's what I want my message to be," King told reporters.

After the cleanup, King thought the day was a huge success.

"Today was a success. #GeorgeFloyd was a believer in peace and love as well as myself n everyone that was out here today helping people in Phoenix," he tweeted. "It's ok to be different! I choose to make an impact in showing love n peace. Make a difference but be smart and calculated."

Twittertwitter.com

In his tweet, King noted that it's "ok to be different!" and that's s huge reason why, even as a punter, he managed to be one of the most popular players on the Raiders during his tenure.

King was known for his booming foot as well as his ability to cut a rug on the field.

Here's his patented Donkey dance.

There's also the famous flag dance (that got him flagged for a penalty.)

King ranked among the top punters in the game during his NFL career. Rumors have it that his eccentric style led to him to being cut from the Raiders by the team's new coach Jon Gruden in 2018.

While his style may have made him a bit much for the No Fun League, King believes that his attitude has helped him be a better person and to help those around him.

"I like to make other people's day," he told The Undefeated. "You might catch [someone] that might want to kill somebody today, but you walk up to them and you're like, 'How's your day going?' You know, then you crack a joke … [they] might not want to kill [that someone] today. You never know."

"Everybody being themselves and not worrying about what other people think about them," he added. "It's just loving one another. Encouraging one another. And being positive."

via UNSW

This article originally appeared on 07.10.21


Dr. Daniel Mansfield and his team at the University of New South Wales in Australia have just made an incredible discovery. While studying a 3,700-year-old tablet from the ancient civilization of Babylon, they found evidence that the Babylonians were doing something astounding: trigonometry!

Most historians have credited the Greeks with creating the study of triangles' sides and angles, but this tablet presents indisputable evidence that the Babylonians were using the technique 1,500 years before the Greeks ever were.


Keep ReadingShow less
Canva

Small actions lead to big movements.

Acts of kindness—we know they’re important not only for others, but for ourselves. They can contribute to a more positive community and help us feel more connected, happier even. But in our incessantly busy and hectic lives, performing good deeds can feel like an unattainable goal. Or perhaps we equate generosity with monetary contribution, which can feel like an impossible task depending on a person’s financial situation.

Perhaps surprisingly, the main reason people don’t offer more acts of kindness is the fear of being misunderstood. That is, at least, according to The Kindness Test—an online questionnaire about being nice to others that more than 60,000 people from 144 countries completed. It does make sense—having your good intentions be viewed as an awkward source of discomfort is not exactly fun for either party.

However, the results of The Kindness Test also indicated those fears were perhaps unfounded. The most common words people used were "happy," "grateful," "loved," "relieved" and "pleased" to describe their feelings after receiving kindness. Less than 1% of people said they felt embarrassed, according to the BBC.


Keep ReadingShow less

A breastfeeding mother's experience at Vienna's Schoenbrunn Zoo is touching people's hearts—but not without a fair amount of controversy.

Gemma Copeland shared her story on Facebook, which was then picked up by the Facebook page Boobie Babies. Photos show the mom breastfeeding her baby next to the window of the zoo's orangutan habitat, with a female orangutan sitting close to the glass, gazing at them.

"Today I got feeding support from the most unlikely of places, the most surreal moment of my life that had me in tears," Copeland wrote.

Keep ReadingShow less